WorldCat Identities

! University of Georgia.! Department of Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy

Overview
Works: 45 works in 45 publications in 1 language and 45 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Administration, and Policy ! University of Georgia.! Department of Lifelong Education
Rural student experiences at an R1 doctoral university by Phillip Dale Grant( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This case study sought to understand the experiences of rural students at an R1 Doctoral University in the Southeastern United States. Using interviews, demographic information surveys, and descriptive statistics, this single-case study assessed the phenomenological experiences of rural students from Georgia. The researcher engaged in deductive, inductive, emotion, and holistic coding in ATLAS.ti to discover themes in the transcripts. Three research questions framed the study: 1. What is the rural student experience at an R1 Doctoral University in the Southeastern United States 2. How do rural students decide to attend an R1 Doctoral University in the Southeastern United States? 3. How does being rural affect a student's sense of belonging at an R1 Doctoral University in the Southeastern United States? For first research question, three themes emerged: (a) curricular disadvantage sets rural students back, especially in STEM (b) socioeconomic status mediates experience (c) rural students alter their religious views in college. For the second research questions, two themes emerged: (a) poor college advising in rural public schools (b) geography is a dynamic barrier. Finally, for the third research question, two themes emerged: (a) rural students experience a shift in cultural and academic expectations (b) residence halls create cultural bridging opportunities for rural students. The researcher provided implications for future research and for practitioners in the concluding chapter of this study
Supporting the unique needs of international transfer students : an action research study by Jane Christine O'Connor( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Transfer students face many challenges when transitioning from one institution to another. International transfer students face additional difficulties. The purpose of this action research (AR) study was to explore and deeply understand the difficulties and unique adjustments faced by transfer students, academically, socially, emotionally, and administratively/practically, as they transition to College T from their old institution and implement interventions to smooth this transition. In particular, the experiences of international transfer students, coming from institutions both within and from outside the United States, who speak English as a second language, were examined. This was done through the lenses of Bridges' (1980, 1991) and Schlossberg's (1981, 1984, 1989, 1995, 2011) theories of transition as well as Oberg's (1960) theory of culture shock. Data were gathered over two and a half years from ten international transfer students at three different times during their first year at College T. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with AR team members as well as staff and graduate/undergraduate students working with transfer students. In addition, survey data were gathered from three different groups of transfer students in spring 2016, fall 2016, and fall 2017. The AR team followed two cycles of AR, which involved assessing the situation, planning action, taking action, and evaluating action (Coghlan & Brannick, 2014). The findings from this study affirm much of the literature related to the challenges of transfer students - that they do experience academic, social, emotional and administrative/practical struggles. In addition, international transfer students have additional challenges stemming from language proficiency, cultural knowledge and culture shock. The major findings drawn from the study were: (1) issues related to language and culture make the transfer and integration experience of international transfer students uniquely challenging; (2) institutions need to be open to making necessary structural changes to provide ongoing, sustained support for transfer students, especially international transfer students, to help them become an integral part of the college community and successful students and Alumni. Implications for future research and practice are offered
Community experiences of partnering in engaged scholarship : bringing their hearts by Katherine Lynn Davis( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This qualitative study employed a modified narrative inquiry methodology to understand the lived experiences of ten core participants in a partnership between a land-grant research university and a rural community in the southeastern United States. The purpose of this inquiry was to explore and describe partnering experiences in a community-engaged scholarship partnership in the rural South. The study was guided by a singular research question: What are the partnering experiences of rural Southern community partners and land-grant research university partners in a collective impact community-engaged partnership? The study findings highlighted the complex, relational matrix of a collective impact initiative and were ultimately focused on partnering within the community rather than between the community and the university. Thematic narrative analysis revealed four narrative threads in the study participants' experiences: Creating Community, Embracing Diversity, Establishing Boundaries and Expectations, and Sustaining the Partnership. The conclusions drawn from the findings centered in: (a) the need for mediating intersects of power and reciprocity among partners within the community, (b) enacting partnering values of diversity and inclusion that are constrained by galvanized normative social values, (c) cultivating community capacities for administering backbone organization roles for partnership sustainability, and (d) employing public narrative and narrative inquiry methods of practice and research in community-engaged scholarship. Recommendations for further community-engaged scholarship research included: a) exploring the implications of establishing boundaries and expectations within the community, (b) expanding the types of community-engaged partnerships and study participants included in the study, (c) assessing the extent and impacts of limited diversity and inclusion on community-engaged partnering, (d) evaluating the outcomes of public narrative and narrative inquiry practices and research on community-engaged partnerships, and (e) a deeper analysis of the intersects of power and reciprocity and their impacts on types of community-engaged partnerships and stages of engagement. This study provides a narrow glimpse into the complex, relational partnering experiences that shape a collective impact community-engaged scholarship partnership between a land-grant research university and a rural Southern community
Adaptive work for high potential educational leaders: action research case study by George Ryan Moore( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study sought to determine how a social learning model that builds defined leadership competencies and requires high-potential assistant principals to engage in adaptive work could produce more quality school leadership candidates. Through the case study, the action research team was able to define systemic competencies needed to be a successful school and/or district leader, and also investigated how engaging in adaptive work as an assistant principal better prepared candidates for a future role as principal. By doing so, this research attempted to solve the problem presented by a leadership shortfall within one district created by a lack of systemic leadership development, an increased need for leaders possessing technical and adaptive leadership competencies, and increasingly high principal turnover rates. Many of the problems in this district are attributed to leaders and authority figures, "as if they were the cause of them, and although people in authority may not be a ready source of answers, rarely are they the source of the pains" (Heifetz, 1994, p.2). Through the action research process, the study uncovered keys to success for defining a leadership competency framework and promising practices for developing locally created leadership pre-induction curriculum. Through qualitative measures, three research questions were answered and yielded positive results for the use of a social learning model focused on adaptive work
Antecedents of job engagement : the mediating role of psychological states by Moonju Sung( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that influence job engagement, with a specific focus on the roles of psychological conditions that promote job engagement. This study aimed to contribute to the knowledgebase about how to foster job engagement based on a rigorous framework consisting of Kahn's (1990) theory of engagement and relevant motivational theories using a sample of 486 employees recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk working in for-profit organizations in the United States. The results of structural equation modeling revealed that financial rewards had a weak, positive relationship with job engagement (research question 1). Job autonomy and financial rewards were shown to have positive relationships with psychological meaningfulness, while learning culture and procedural justice were found to have positive relationships with psychological safety (research question 2). The results also showed that psychological meaningfulness strongly predicted job engagement (research question 3). In addition, psychological meaningfulness was found to mediate the relationships between job autonomy and job engagement and between financial rewards and job engagement (research question 4). This study offers three distinct contributions. First, Kahn's (1990) theory of engagement at work has been further empirically supported, further evidencing the mediating role of psychological meaningfulness in the relationships between job elements and job engagement and evidencing the effects of job elements on psychological meaningfulness and the effect of work context on psychological safety. Second, psychological meaningfulness substantially predicted job engagement. Lastly, the findings indicate that the effects of rewards may depend more on how strongly they satisfy psychological needs rather than whether the rewards are intrinsic or extrinsic. Implications for theory, future research, and practice are discussed
Campus housing departments as learning organizations : assessing learning culture and organizational performance by Elizabeth Mary Cox( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study was to examine the learning culture in campus housing departments and assess its relationship to organizational performance. The research questions guiding this study looked at (1) the extent to which campus housing departments exhibited the characteristics of a learning organization; (2) how perceptions of the learning organization differed by institutional type, organizational structure, reporting lines, and involvement in a public-private partnership; (3) how perceptions of organizational performance differed by institutional type, organizational structure, reporting lines, and involvement in a public-private partnership; (4) the extent to which the learning organization explained variance in organizational performance; (5) and which dimensions of a learning organization contributed most to organizational performance. This study used an adapted version of Watkins and Marsick's (1997) 21-item Dimensions of a Learning Organization Questionnaire (DLOQ). The survey asked respondents about learning culture, organizational performance, and institutional characteristics. Learning culture was measured through the seven dimensions of continuous learning opportunities, promotion of dialogue and inquiry, collaboration and team learning, empowerment towards a shared vision, embedded learning systems, system connections to the environment, and strategic leadership for learning. This study used financial performance, knowledge performance, and educational performance to measure organizational performance. Respondents were Senior Housing Officers (SHO) at colleges and universities in the United States. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and multiple regression. This study reaffirmed the positive relationship between the learning organization and organizational performance. All bivariate dimensions correlations were significant and positive except one (p<.01). The overall model found that all seven dimensions of a learning organization collectively predicted financial performance (F(7,201)=3.91, p =.000), knowledge performance (F(7,201)=3.68, p=.001), and educational performance (F(7,201)=6.48, p=.001). Embedded systems to capture and share learning and strategic leadership were the two significant predictors for financial, knowledge, and educational performance. The study validated the DLOQ in a new context of campus housing departments, and it introduced a holistic perspective of performance to housing departments. It introduced a practical theory and instrument with the DLOQ. This study took the learning organization from concept to concrete strategy for housing departments
"We haffi try it" : an action research case study of communicating policy change in the Caribbean by Donna Ann Marie Walter( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study explored communication strategies utilized by farmers during the implementation of a national agricultural policy innovation and the impact that an action research collaborative inquiry had during this process at the individual, group, and system levels. The three primary research questions guiding this study were: What strategies do farmers seek to use to improve communication with statutory authoritative (SA) bodies during a national restructuring and reorganizing process? How do farmers, SAs, and stakeholders describe and understand power? How does the action research collaborative inquiry process influence change at the individual, farmers' groups, and system levels? Through action research the lead researcher, along with six farmers, identified local contextual solutions to address the communication gap between farmers and statutory authoritative bodies. Data were collected through individual interviews, critical incident interviews, document reviews, and notes from action research group meetings. The action research interventions included facilitating a face-to-face meeting with statutory authoritative bodies' leadership. Two conclusions were drawn from the analysis of the data findings: (1) When in a powerless position, demand-pull interpersonal communication strategies were most effective in obtaining information about a policy innovation; (2) The action research (AR) process provided a conduit for new learning on multiple levels ⁰́₃ individual, group, and system. Implications included the following: (1) As a type of process research, the AR study adds to diffusion studies by examining the development of interpersonally communication channels and this process' impact on strongly held attitudes about the national policy innovation; (2) Using process research adds to the diffusion literature when the context involves complex policy innovations; and (3) AR inquiry can facilitate a farming community developing local community practices and leadership skills for communicating effectively with SAs. INDEX WORDS: Communicating policy innovations, Action research, Farmers, Emerging economies, Adult education, Adult learning
The impact of professional learning communities on teacher engagement of culturally responsive teaching through action research by Crystal Tanya Thompson( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

THE IMPACT OF PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES ON TEACHER ENGAGEMENT OF CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE TEACHING THROUGH ACTION RESEARCH (Under the direction of Karen Bryant) ABSTRACT This action research (AR) case study addresses the impact of professional learning communities (PLC) on the teacher engagement of Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT). This mixed methods action research study examined the perceived beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors of teachers related to CRT. The AR team engaged in experiences to determine whether those varied experiences supported their personal and professional understanding of the CRT theory and approach. The following research questions were the basis for this case study and enabled the team to evaluate the AR process: 1. What are teachers' pedagogical beliefs and attitudes relative to CRT and how do those beliefs and attitudes influence their teaching? 2. How does participation in a PLC impact teachers' conceptual understanding and use of CRT strategies in the classroom? 3. What does an AR team learn through the use of CRT in the classroom? The study used a mixed methods approach using the Culturally Responsive Teaching Efficacy Scale (CRTES), the Culturally Responsive Teaching Outcome Expectations Scale (CRTOES), and the Culturally Responsive Classroom Management Self-Efficacy Scale (CRCMSE). Qualitative instruments included researcher notes, interviews, individual team interviews, and experiential feedback from the action research team. Conclusions about how schools can increase teacher engagement in CRT professional learning included the following: 1. A diverse action research team who learns about CRT professional learning before and during the school year learns about the CRT approach at a higher level; 2. Incorporate CRT strategies and skills into teacher leader standards to inform teacher expectations and a focus on individual student needs; 3. Plan a CRT professional learning program under the leadership of a skilled CRT facilitator based on experiential learning and adult learning theory. The results implied that teachers who participate in professional learning based on adult learning theory and experiential theory for CRT increase their self-efficacy and learning about the impact of culturally responsive teaching practices. INDEX WORDS: action research case study, Culturally Responsive Teaching, professional learning communities, adult learning theory, and experiential learning theory
The worldwide diffusion and institutionalization of lifelong learning : a cross-national analysis by Chŏng-ŭn Yi( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study examined the worldwide diffusion and institutionalization of lifelong learning between 1996 and 2015. Using data from UNESCO National Reports on Adult Learning and Education, this study documented the diffusion patterns and investigated factors that influenced the diffusion of lifelong learning policies. The study found that 73% of countries (N=151) adopted lifelong learning policies between 1996 and 2015. The result also revealed that the adoption of lifelong learning rapidly increased during the earlier period (between 1996 and 2007), and then the growth rate leveled off during the later period (after 2007). Many European countries adopted lifelong learning policies during the earlier period; however, a number of low and low-middle income countries in Africa, Latin American, and the Caribbean also adopted lifelong learning policies during this period of time. Among various policy components including basic education, vocational education, adult education, and lifelong learning, 39% of countries adopted at least one out of the four components, while 33% adopted more than one of the policy approaches. Basic education and adult education were two components adopted by the largest number of countries. The results of event history analyses of factors that influenced the diffusion process showed that economic and political development had positive effects on the diffusion of lifelong learning policies but only during the earlier period (from 1996 to 2007). In addition, global and regional density, organizational linkage to world society, and participation in international meetings showed positive effects on the diffusion of lifelong learning, specifically during the later period (after 2007). These findings support the relevance of both modernization theory and sociological institutionalism in understanding the diffusion of lifelong learning. Lastly, the findings suggest that although international organizations play critical roles in disseminating the overarching policy framework of lifelog learning, the way in which the discourse is interpreted and translated into policy varies, depending on national contexts
Implementing a pivotal talent pool strategy to improve college student retention : an action research study on improving performance of a centralized academic advising unit by Eric Justin Tack( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Improving student retention rates is imperative for U.S. colleges and universities; however, despite decades of research, a universal strategy for increasing retention rates remains elusive. The purpose of this study was to determine if a pivotal talent pool strategy (PTPS) helped to improve performance in a centralized academic advising unit at a regional state university, resulting in an increase in student retention rates. The director of advising at the study site led an action research (AR) team, consisting of two academic affairs leadership personnel, in a two-year study engaging five assistant directors of advising and 14 front-line academic advisors as research participants. Academic advisors served as the pivotal talent pool for this study. Two research questions guided this research: (1) How, if at all, does implementing a PTPS affect the performance and short-term impact of a centralized academic advising unit? (2) What is required of a centralized advising unit to create the conditions that support the development and implementation of such a PTPS? Qualitative data were collected using several methods, including benchmarking and semi-structured interviews, meeting notes, email correspondences, researcher journal entries, and organizational documents. Additionally, data were generated by examining term-over-term undergraduate student re-registration rates. The AR team adhered to Coghlan and Brannick's (2010) traditional AR cycle, comprising four basic steps: constructing, planning action, taking action, and evaluating action. This study consisted of one mega-research cycle focused on improving the performance of the academic advisors, with an embedded sub-cycle focused on the performance of the supervisors of academic advisors. The AR team integrated Ruona's (2004) consulting to improve the performance process to intervene with academic advisors and their supervisors. The data were analyzed both inductively and deductively using the constant comparative method (Ruona, 2005). The findings showed that using a PTPS (Ruona, 2014, 2017) improved the performance of a pivotal talent position. The results also highlighted factors impacting performance that practitioners must consider when implementing a PTPS. Moreover, the study revealed opportunities to further explore how the PTPS employed by the study site has a long-term impact on improving student retention rates at the university and other institutions
Enhancing teacher efficacy and competency for project-based learning in middle grades math and science classes by Richard Andrew Whatley( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT This action research (AR) case study addressed the barriers teachers face when implementing project-based learning (PBL) in math and science middle grades classes. The AR team identified barriers and developed solutions to overcoming challenges when teachers plan and implement PBL. The AR team developed and coordinated a professional development program consisting of an initial PBL workshop, professional learning community (PLC) sessions, and observations and feedback. To evaluate the AR process, the following questions guided this study: What are perceived barriers to PBL implementation and how might those barriers be removed to ensure implementation of PBL with greater fidelity? How might professional development be used to increase teachers' levels of PBL implementation and efficacy in the classroom? What is learned by an action research team as it collaboratively works to develop a PBL professional development program? Under the guidance of action research, the team examined feedback from the Buck Institute Project-based Learning Survey, the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale, focus group interview transcriptions, PLC meeting notes, and observation feedback to determine if the interventions removed barriers and improved teacher efficacy. Findings included the following: (1) Teachers experienced seven common barriers that inhibited their PBL development and implementation, (2) seven solutions were developed to mitigate the barriers, (3) a comprehensive professional development program consisting of an initial workshop, a series of PLC sessions, and observations and non-evaluative feedback significantly enhanced teachers' PBL implementation and efficacy, and (4) teacher mindset is integral in adopting PBL instructional practices
Growing adaptive leadership mindset : a constructive developmental approach by Debra Mitchell Longo( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As the world evolves, the issues humanity must face grow increasingly complex. Organizations need leaders able to navigate the daunting challenges that appear in this constantly changing environment. Through collaborative developmental action inquiry (Torbert & Associates, 2004) this action research case study took place at Southern University, a large private research institution in the United States. Situated in the literature at the intersection of adaptive leadership theory (Heifetz, 1994; Heifetz & Laurie, 1997; Heifetz & Linsky, 2002, 2009), double loop learning theory (Argyris, 1977, 1991) and constructive developmental theory (Kegan, 1982, 1994), the purpose of this study was to understand how to create the learning conditions for midlevel managers to develop the skillset and mindset necessary to transition from operational management to adaptive leadership. The questions that guided this study were 1) How does a developmentally informed program impact midlevel leaders' mindset for adaptive leadership? 2) What are the conditions under which program participants and the action research (AR) team are able to engage adaptive leadership development? 3) What happens when collaborative developmental action inquiry (CDAI) is used as a methodology for designing and implementing a leadership program? This study showed that a collaborative approach to leadership development program design leads to the growth of adaptive leaders. Implications include a model for a collaborative developmental approach to growing adaptive leadership mindset
Effective feedback, learning goal orientation, and self-efficacy by Tara Dooley Dougherty( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This case study analyzed the implementation of a classroom observation feedback process aimed at improving the feedback that teachers receive from evaluators. Research questions focused on understanding the extent to which an effective feedback process influences learning goal orientation and teacher self-efficacy. This study employed action research through the facilitation of Likert scale survey questions and teacher-evaluator conference transcripts. Findings indicate the following: the Classroom Observation Feedback Process intervention positively influenced teacher perceptions of evaluator feedback; positively influenced teacher efficacy; feedback to the individual professional goals of educators resulted in the perception that the feedback was more specific and useful; the interventions implemented by the action research team positively influenced teacher perceptions of evaluator feedback and self-efficacy, resulting in positive changes with teacher pedagogy
The influence of professional learning communities on teacher efficacy and advanced placement practices by Kenneth Stefan Lawrence( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As the general public demands more accountability on behalf of schools, educators struggle to meet rising minimum standards. In an effort to address these expectations and search for ways to improve, educators consider applying a professional learning community (PLC) practice, which centers on the improvement of teaching and learning. While traits of professional learning communities are documented in the literature, little is known about how the model affects both teacher efficacy and the classroom practices of Advanced Placement (AP) teachers. The purpose of this study is to determine the influence a PLC has on the efficacy of the teachers participating, as well as the AP English exam scores of those teachers' students. Action research will drive this project in an attempt to answer the following research questions: 1. How is teacher self efficacy influenced by participation in a PLC? 2. In what ways do teachers engage in the process of collective learning through a PLC? 3. How does participation in a PLC affect teacher practices in AP classrooms? The researcher employed a mixed methods approach. A survey instrument and student exam scores were used to gather quantitative data. Qualitative data in this study consists of pre and post interviews with participants and researcher observation notes
Impact of professional learning on cultural proficiency by Barbara Nell Sims( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Bridging the achievement gap has become a major focus for most school districts as one result of NCLB and high-stakes testing. New assessment accountability measures are forcing leaders to take a fresh look at standards-based leadership and accountability in the context of diverse schools. The need for multicultural training is no longer isolated within urban communities. Milner (2010) argues that it is critically important, particularly, for educators in urban, suburban, and rural environments to understand the "differences, complexities, and nuances" inherent in what it means to teach in these settings (Milner, 2012, p. 709). Culturally proficient teachers and leaders are needed to address twenty-first century students in our increasingly diverse and modern technological world: "Cultural proficiency is a model for shifting the culture of the school or district; it is a model for individual transformation and organizational change" (Lindsey et al., 2009, p. 4). Teacher preparation programs are not adequately preparing their pre-service students to understand changes in curricular approaches to diversity from the color-blind approach to multiculturalism. Meece and Wingate recommend that pre-service teachers need training in how to understand the anti-bias curriculum and its relationship to the current achievement gap. Culturally relevant pedagogy rests on three criteria or propositions: "(a) students must experience academic success; (b) students must develop and/or maintain cultural competence; and (c) students must develop a critical consciousness through which they challenge the current status quo of the social order" (p. 160). This action research case study examines the impact of cultural proficiency training on the beliefs, biases, and assumptions of elementary grade teachers. The theories used to frame this action research study include the Cultural Proficiency Theory and the Culturally Responsive Instruction Theory (CRI), undergirded by Mezirow's Transformative Adult Learning Theory supported by the Social Capital Theory
Sustaining a new paradigm of teacher learning: using action research to create a collaborative culture of complexity by Leigh Ann Smith Perry( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Professional development that sustains continuous improvement in teacher practice is a problem that schools face on an international level (Darling-Hammond, 2009; Elmore, 2014; Killion & Roy, 2009; Opfer & Pedder, 2011). In response to this problem, Georgia now requires professional learning to be "primarily job-embedded and done within the school's community to support teachers' professional learning goals" (Rule 505-2-36, Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC), 2017). The purpose of this action research (AR) case study was to gain a deeper understanding of the multicausal factors that may influence the sustainability of teacher learning and change through a complex systems approach (Pedder & Opfer, 2010). This study further explored interventions to support job-embedded learning in an elementary school through the development of professional learning communities (PLCs). The following research questions framed this study: (1) How do organizational and individual factors influence the levels of teacher learning practice? (2) What can be learned from the experiences of members of a PLC team as a school seeks to improve its learning culture through job-embedded professional learning? (3) How do the learnings from an AR project affect the sustainability of teacher learning practices within a PLC? To answer the research questions, qualitative and quantitative data collection methods were used that consisted of interviews, surveys, a questionnaire, observations, and document analysis. The overall findings indicated: (1) teacher learning practices were influenced by school and teacher learning orientations; (2) by creating supportive conditions for collaborative learning, teacher learning practices improved and teacher agency increased; (3) members of the AR team became more aware of their own contributions to the school's learning culture and acted as agents of change. These results suggest that a complex model of teacher learning offers a new perspective for school leaders as they seek to create learning organizations by building collective capacity. There are limited studies of professional development that utilize a complex systems approach like that of Pedder and Opfer (2010). Therefore, ongoing research utilizing this approach for studying teacher learning is needed, particularly related to teacher dissonance
Developing a culture of evidence : an action research study on moving from good intentions toward strategic intentionality by Shannon Renee Corey( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Various regional and national agencies have made a call to action for accountability in higher education. Much has been written about assessment and the elements that support an evidence-based culture, yet little is documented about the process of establishing such a culture. In an effort to address this gap, the housing department (HD) at Metropolitan City University (MCU) engaged in an action research (AR) study to explore the development of a culture of evidence through the cultural web organizational change framework (Johnson, Whittington, Scholes, Angwin, & Regner, 2014), in the context of a student affairs department at a large, public and urban university. The AR team aimed to determine how to develop a culture of evidence through understanding (a) how to assess a culture of evidence, (b) conditions fostering a culture of evidence, and (c) use of action research in facilitating the development of a culture of evidence. Data included interviews, surveys, focus groups, action research team meeting notes, online reflections, and researcher notes. Tapping into the literature related to organization culture, specifically utilizing the cultural web (Johnson et al., 2014), this action research study led to (a) the development of a tool to assess a culture of evidence and (b) to the HD at MCU able to begin making a shift towards a culture of evidence. Implications include use of a culture of evidence rubric in practice and highlighting the need for more in-depth, empirical, and longitudinal research on cultures of evidence
The influence of discipline on African American male students with disabilities in a middle school : an action research study by Karen Nicole Allen( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

How do teachers perceive the ways in which African American males are disciplined in middle school? 2. How might a culturally responsive school-wide discipline protocol affect teacher discipline practices? 3. How does the action research process affect the overall discipline and school climate? A mixed methods approach was utilized to answer the above questions. Findings from the case study suggest that African American male students and students with disabilities receive harsher punishments, as evidenced in the literature; teacher-student relationships influence the occurrence of discipline; students are less likely to be redirected in a whole group; fewer discipline infractions occur when rules are modeled and reviewed within the classroom environment; culturally responsive plans encourage more opportunities to address discipline while increasing accountability; and, while there was a significant decrease in the number of students receiving discipline consequences, the protocol had relatively low significance on overall school discipline
Recovery districts and weighted student funding : how two education policies arrived on policy agendas in three states by Stephen Joseph Owens( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this state comparative multi-case study is to explore decision makers' perceptions of the many elements that led to weighted student funding and state recovery districts arriving on the education policy agendas in Georgia, Nevada, and Pennsylvania. Through document review, archival analysis, and interviews with 24 stakeholders close to education policy in the three states, this study traces the evolution of the two policies from relative obscurity to a limited number of policy options to address stated problems. Through a case study methodology, this research resulted in three primary findings. First, the impact of governors in state agenda setting was ubiquitous, powerful, and far-reaching. Second, the Great Recession played a significant role in defining the problems that recovery districts and weighted student funding purported to solve. Finally, nation-wide intermediary organizations exerted political influence primarily through tight policy communities and targeted policy actors with shared political ideology. Implications for further research are also presented
Conducting a culturally responsive evaluation : values engagement, self-reflexivity, and photo elicitation by Nuria Jaumot-Pascual( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The U.S. population 65 and older is projected to increase in size and diversity (Huntley-Hall, 2017; Vincent & Velkoff, 2010). In addition, current mass culture, which prioritizes the visual over other senses, has been described as hyper-visual (Knowles & Sweetman, 2004). As culture changes with the rise of and the access to digital visual technologies (Knowles & Sweetman, 2004) and with the increased diversity of the population, particularly the older adult population (Huntley-Hall, 2017; Vincent & Velkoff, 2010), research and evaluation need to respond to those trends with frameworks and methods that are tailored to attend not only to the research questions, but also to the values and cultural needs of participants. Responding to this need, I evaluated a community-based Healthy Aging Program (HAP) for older adults using the combination of two frameworks: culturally responsive evaluation (Hood, Hopson, & Kirkhart, 2015) and values engaged, educative framework (VEE) (Greene, DeStefano, Burgon, & Hall, 2006). This dissertation responds to Hood, Hopson, and Kirkhart's (2015) call for more research on evaluation, including examples of culturally responsive evaluations and the reflection on the articulation of CRE with other evaluation frameworks. This call was addressed in several ways. For the current study I was able to: (1) provide an example of a culturally responsive evaluation undertaken from the values engaged, educative (VEE) framework designed by Greene, DeStefano, Burgon, and Hall (2006); (2) provide a reflection on the articulation of CRE and the VEE framework; (3) test the transferability of the VEE framework from STEM education to community-based programs and proposed adding organizational capacity a new element of the framework; (4) propose photo elicitation methods as culturally responsive with older adults; (5) propose the use of photo elicitation methods to foster evaluative processes such as self-reflection and self-reflexivity; and (6) examine how photo elicitation methods have been used in the past to suggest the future use of consistent terminology
 
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