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University of Georgia Electronic Theses and Dissertations database

Overview
Works: 2,036 works in 2,043 publications in 1 language and 2,043 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Classifications: TD525.A74,
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Most widely held works by University of Georgia Electronic Theses and Dissertations database
Integrating experiential learning and landscape architecture to facilitate engagement and awareness of waste landscapes by Ying Chen( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis examines the potential role that landscape architects can play in increasing awareness of waste practices from experiential learning perspectives. My research question asks, how can landscape architecture facilitate experiential learning in waste landscapes? Facing the great waste challenges around urban areas, people start to realize that waste has become an inevitable part of our lives. For the purpose of increasing understanding of waste and engagement in waste landscapes, landscape architecture design is applied to create an integrated design framework with experiential learning. Following case studies and the literature review, a discussion about the availability of conceptual design approaches will take place
Linking anthropogenic resources to wildlife-pathogen dynamics : from theory to vampire bats by Dan Becker( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For many wildlife, consumer⁰́₃resource interactions are altered by human activities that provide supplemental food. As anthropogenic resources are often more abundant and predictable than natural foods, subsidized populations can be larger, aggregated, and better-fed than wild animals. A growing literature suggests anthropogenic resources can have profound impacts on host⁰́₃pathogen interactions, in some cases increasing cross-species transmission. However, predicting when and where anthropogenic resources will increase such risks is complicated, as supplemental resources can simultaneously affect hosts and pathogens through multiple and opposing mechanisms. Factors enhancing transmission, such as increased aggregation, could be offset by improved immunity due to lower starvation stress. The aim of this dissertation is to develop and test an integrative framework for understanding how anthropogenic resources affect wildlife disease. I first built supplemental resources into mechanistic models to explore the overall effect of provisioning on epidemiological outcomes; this work demonstrated that how resources affect host immunity is critical for understanding if supplemental feeding increases or decreases transmission. I next synthesized the literature on how host⁰́₃pathogen interactions respond to supplemental feeding to test support for these theoretical mechanisms; this meta-analysis demonstrated strong support for higher contact rates in supplemented populations increasing infection but variable effects of provisioning on host condition and weak effects on demography. I next extended models to a metapopulation scale to predict how the landscape-level deployment of supplemental food affects infection dynamics; these studies improved existing theory on pathogen dynamics in metapopulations and showed that host occupancy can be maximized and infection can be minimized if landscapes contain heterogeneous mixtures of unprovisioned and provisioned habitats. Lastly, I examined these processes in the context of a natural system by asking how anthropogenic resources interact with immunity, demography, and bacterial infection for vampire bats in Latin America. Results suggested that livestock expansion could stimulate bat demography and innate immunity, in turn having strong negative effects on prevalence of a vector-borne pathogen but no relationship with a directly transmitted pathogen. Collectively, this dissertation provides theoretically informed and testable predictions for how anthropogenic resources affect wildlife disease across taxa and in an important applied system
Parks that provide : incorporating food forests into urban public space by Melanie Jeane Bowerman( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis aims to show how food forests can be considered a valid and valuable addition to public urban agriculture options. With increasing public awareness concerning conventional agriculture practices, and the need for local food security, urban agriculture is once again gaining popularity. Nonetheless, serious investment and consideration in creating permanent spaces for food production is lacking within cities. Urban agriculture is still often viewed as a nuisance rather than a resource for social and ecological benefits. This study investigates the potential of food forests, which differ greatly in design and program from other common urban agriculture typologies, to provide public services, and contribute to the health of urban ecosystems, while also producing food. It seeks to understand how food forests can be successfully integrated into cities as multifunctional public space, which may help encourage the establishment of permanent urban agricultural spaces within cities. Classification methodology is used to create a framework to evaluate the success of food forests in three areas of design theory: permaculture and food forest design, public space design, and urban sustainability. Two case studies are then analyzed based on this framework to assess the current function of existing urban food forests. A conceptual design for a public food forest in Atlanta, GA is offered as a model, which can be emulated in future designs
Anti-glycative and antioxidant properties of purple muscadine and concord grape juices and their wines by Andrew Austin Brock( )

2 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The regular consumption of foods and beverages rich in powerful antioxidant phytochemicals has been associated with reduced risks of chronic diseases. For this reason, the antioxidative and anti-glycative activities of Concord and muscadine grape juices and wines were investigated. Though the total phenolics' content of muscadine and Concord grape beverages were similar, the H-ORACFL value of muscadine products were significantly greater than those of Concord grape products. Furthermore, muscadine juice and wine retarded bovine serum albumin glycation to a greater extent than Concord juice and when incubations were performed on equi-volumetric and -phenolic bases. When applied to Caco-2 cells, muscadine products exhibited significantly greater cellular antioxidant activity than the Concord products. Interestingly, the juices of each grape displayed significantly greater anti-glycative and cellular antioxidant activity than their wines. These results indicate that consumption of muscadine products may offer greater health benefits than that of Concord products
Evaluation of herbicide response in bermudagrass hybrids and Vidalia onions established using PlanTape technology by Allison Danielle Couch( )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contamination of hybrid bermudagrass [Cynodon transvalensis Burtt Davy × Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] cultivars by another cultivar, tetraploid common bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], or other grassy weed pressure can be a major problem. The development of an Acetyl CoA Carboxylase tolerant bermudagrass hybrid would allow for selective control of these offtypes on golf courses, sports fields, and home lawns. After applying sethoxydim, clethodim, fluazifop, and quizolafop to hybrid bermudagrasses in the greenhouse, genotypes 93-175 and 16-T-4598 exhibited lower injury than 'Tifway' and 'Celebration', which may allow traditional breeding techniques to be used in order to create an Acetyl CoA Carboxylase tolerant cultivar. Vidalia onions experience yield loss due to weeds and have high cost for hand transplanting, but PlantTape technology would allow farmers to lower planting costs. The use of the registered herbicides, pendimethalin, oxyfluorfen, and S-metolachlor, on PlantTape onions controlled weeds and improved yield when compared to the nontreated plots with little injury to the onions
Planning for landscape change : how maps and apps promote heritage tourism through cultural landscape interpretation by Naomi Cara Braff( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis draws a connection between the intentions of both historic and present-day mapmakers to illustrate how maps are used to interpret the landscape for promotional purposes. A study of the cultural significance of historic landscapes, along with a comparison of spatial histories that use maps as a means of storytelling, will result in the development of a spatial history of the study area, McIntosh County, on the coast of Georgia. The importance of this study is to illustrate the value in storytelling through maps and their potential for use in promoting economic development through heritage tourism
Need-based evaluation of sewer access for single-family residential housing in Athens-Clarke county, Georgia by Alex Michael Smith( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has estimated that as much as 44 percent of the nation's sewer pipes will be in poor if not very poor conditions by 2020. Many Municipalities' sewer infrastructures are coming to an end of an investment cycle and new expenditures in replacing and upgrading, as well as, constructing new infrastructure will be needed. Conditions like these require attentive planning methods. Sewer has the capacity to steer and direct growth when coupled with regulatory planning, such as zoning, opportunities exist. To avoid regretted investments, Geographic Information Systems allows for the visualization of planning choices before they are made. The focus of this thesis is to provide a method that prioritizes future need, specifically in single-family residential housing. Single-family residential housing densities are defined by zoning designations; thus providing an opportunity to model future impact across a study area as well as provide comparative results
Wheels of preservation : mobile structures and the National Register of Historic Places by Joshua Hamilton Baum( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis was written to provide evidence and justification for the inclusion of historically significant automobiles on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). During the first half of the twentieth century, the automobile transformed American culture and reshaped America's landscape. The NRHP includes thousands of individual listings of road-related resources which owe their significance to the automobile. Automobiles themselves, however, are not represented. Arguing for their inclusion, this thesis begins by examining the early history of automobiles in the United States and the history of the NRHP. Mobile structures listed on the NRHP, such as ships and aircraft, are then evaluated for similarities with automobiles. Finally, a privately-run register for historic automobiles is evaluated for compatibility with the NRHP
An investigation of the effects of genetics and planting density on age 6 performance of eight diverse loblolly pine genotypes when grown on two contrasting sites by Derek Sean Dougherty( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study evaluated performance of eight enhanced loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) genotypes planted at two densities (388 and 518 TPA) on two contrasting sites, an upland site in Marion County, Georgia and a lowland, coastal site in Berkeley County, South Carolina. Genotypes evaluated included one high yielding open pollinated (OP) family, three elite control mass pollinated (CMP) crosses, two somatic embryogenesis (SE) clones and two rooted cutting (RC) clones. The study utilized a randomized complete block design with main plots of density split on genotype treatments. Treatment effects on mean DBH, height, DBH/HT ratio, site index, individual tree volume, per acre basal area, and per acre volume were evaluated. Genotype was by far the most impactful treatment at age 6. Planting the best performing genotype in the study as compared to the low end performer significantly (p-value = <0.001) increased the mean variables of DBH by 1.7 inches, height by 12 feet, basal area by 35 ft2/acre, volume per tree by 1.0 ft3, and per acre volume by 268 ft3 by age 6. Choosing to operate on a SC coastal site versus a GA upland site significantly (p-value = <0.001) increased DBH by 0.3 inches, mean total height by 3.2 feet, volume per tree by 0.4 ft3, basal area per acre by 7.4 ft2, and volume per acre by 170 ft3. At age 6, at a basal area of 51 ft2 per acre on the SC site and 44 ft2 per acre on the GA site, density was highly significant on DBH (0.3 inches greater at 388 TPA) and basal area (7.4 ft2/acre greater at 518 TPA). Through 6 growing seasons, both site and genotype were highly significant (p-value <0.001) on site index. No significant site x genotype or site x density interactions were observed. Growth and yield by product class was projected by product class and bare land value (BLV) was calculated for all treatments. Base model variables input into the FastLob growth and yield model included age 6 exhibited site index, basal area, and surviving trees per acres for both sites. Age 13 tree grading on the GA site empowered a grade-adjusted BLV comparison for that site. Site effects increased BLV by 11% going from the GA upland site to the SC coastal site. Genotype effects increased BLV by 57% going from commercial clone C40 to the highest ranking genotype. Clone AA93 and CMP M15 graded out at 52% and 29% pole percentage at age 13
Multi-dimensional fiber optic sensors for biomedical and soft robotic applications by Li Xu( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Optical fiber sensing has been widely used in in biomedical and soft robotics applications due to the unique features such as small size, high sensitivity, flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference. Among various types of optical fiber sensors, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has drawn lot of attention due to its unique advantages such as compact size, simple fabrication process, and high sensitivity for various physical phenomenon. In this thesis, several unique designs of FBG based sensors for biomedical and soft robotics applications are presented to achieve multi-dimensional measurement. FBG based sensors with different structures are used for sensing various physical parameters including contact force, bending curvature, and shape. Furthermore, a new interrogation scheme for FBG sensor is presented to simplify the measurement process of FBG as well as to enable real time sensing
The role of flagellar motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) by Madison Shea Floyd( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a primarily pulmonary disease characterized by impaired mucociliary clearance and chronic bacterial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the main CF pathogen responsible for large-scale neutrophil recruitment in the airways. When neutrophils fail to clear bacteria, P. aeruginosa-induced neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) likely form, during which neutrophil granulocytes release granule components with decondensed neutrophil DNA from the ruptured membrane. We aimed to determine the contribution of P. aeruginosa's flagellum-powered motility to NET formation, and the role of MyD88 signaling in this pathway. Motile wild-type P. aeruginosa triggered significantly more NET formation than its motility- and flagellum- deficient counterparts. Additionally, MyD88 signaling was not involved in triggering NETosis. We propose bacterial motility is the primary virulence determinant responsible for triggering NETosis through a mechanism involving cooperation of multiple, MyD88-independent bacterial recognition receptors acting synergistically. This work could lead to potential therapeutic targets for controlling NET formation in CF airways
Developing a culture of evidence : an action research study on moving from good intentions toward strategic intentionality by Shannon Renee Corey( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Various regional and national agencies have made a call to action for accountability in higher education. Much has been written about assessment and the elements that support an evidence-based culture, yet little is documented about the process of establishing such a culture. In an effort to address this gap, the housing department (HD) at Metropolitan City University (MCU) engaged in an action research (AR) study to explore the development of a culture of evidence through the cultural web organizational change framework (Johnson, Whittington, Scholes, Angwin, & Regner, 2014), in the context of a student affairs department at a large, public and urban university. The AR team aimed to determine how to develop a culture of evidence through understanding (a) how to assess a culture of evidence, (b) conditions fostering a culture of evidence, and (c) use of action research in facilitating the development of a culture of evidence. Data included interviews, surveys, focus groups, action research team meeting notes, online reflections, and researcher notes. Tapping into the literature related to organization culture, specifically utilizing the cultural web (Johnson et al., 2014), this action research study led to (a) the development of a tool to assess a culture of evidence and (b) to the HD at MCU able to begin making a shift towards a culture of evidence. Implications include use of a culture of evidence rubric in practice and highlighting the need for more in-depth, empirical, and longitudinal research on cultures of evidence
Ripple effect : how sea level rise induced migration will affect all U.S. communities by Mathew Earl Hauer( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Growing evidence demonstrates that climate change and sea level rise (SLR) can have profound impacts on human migration and there is growing worry that climate change is likely to cause mass human migration over the next century. Most of the existing SLR impact studies have inherent limitations on three fronts: (1) ⁰́at-risk' populations are conceptualized as binary groups; (2) methodological shortcomings lead to a divorce of nature and society; and (3) the impact of SLR migrants in landlocked communities is largely ignored. Overcoming these limitations requires radically different research approaches and a transformative paradigm shift in the geography of SLR impacts. Drawing on increasingly sophisticated flood modeling, this dissertation investigates a new small area projection methodology, migrant destinations associated with environmental change, and the potential impacts of displaced persons on landlocked communities. The findings from this dissertation will be the first step towards understanding more complete societal impacts of SLR
A spatial and temporal investigation of estuarine and shelf flows on the Georgia coast by Trevor Keith Richards( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A series of hydrographic surveys and monitoring instrument deployments were performed within the Georgia Coastal Ecosystem Long Term Ecology Research domain and across the adjacent region of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). The result were also compared to the finite volume community ocean model (FVCOM) for the Georgia Coastal Ecosystem domain for the year 2014. The region contains three major sounds - Sapelo, Doboy, and Altamaha Sounds - and lies adjacent to the widest portion of the SAB. In 2014, the Winter and Spring seasons experienced high river discharge from the Altamaha River, while Summer and Fall seasonal discharges were relatively low. There was also a strong nor'easter event in early April that corresponded to high northerly winds. Bottom mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) within the sounds indicate that the tides are dominated by the lunar semidiurnal constituent (M2) and the shallow water overtide (M4). Removing the dominant tidal constituents from 24 hour surveys spanning the width of the navigable portion of each of the Sounds results in a net residual export of estuarine waters across all four seasons, with exports being somewhat higher and more to the south during periods of high discharge. Hydrographic surveys on the SAB also show the extent of freshwater intrusion on the shelf with maximal extent during high discharge. Empirical orthogonal function analysis of moorings placed on the SAB during April, 2014 indicate that there are two major modes driving cross shelf flows within the region: along-shore wind stress and freshwater discharge in the coastal waters. Bottom cross shelf flows dictated by wind stress and the impact of winds is larger further offshore. There is only a single major mode apparent in the along shelf flow of coastal waters. The spatial observations are in agreement with model output generated by the FVCOM for the GCE domain
Comprehensive metabolomics reveals the impacts of aflatoxin B1 and green tea polyphenols on gut-microbiota dependent metabolisms in rodent models by Jun Zhou( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human commensal microorganisms play a critical role in regulating host physiology and health status. Xenobiotics can induce complex changes of gut-microbiota and cause significantly impacts on host health, but the detailed mechanisms are not fully established. This dissertation project focused on the impacts of two representative natural products: aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and green tea polyphenols (GTPs) on gut-microbiota dependent metabolisms and overall host physiological changes in model rats. The hypothesis is that the dynamics of gut-microbiome induced by xenobiotics may disrupt gut-microbiota dependent metabolisms and metabolic pathways, which contribute to the adverse health outcomes or promotion of host health status.Through 16S rRNA gene survey and metagenomic analysis, we found that AFB1 and GTPs modified gut-microbiota community structure and gene orthalogs with respect to energy metabolism, obesity, and inflammation. Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) and nutritional beneficial effects were analyzed by integrating data collected from multipal analytical platforms, different bioinformatics and biostatistics tools, as well as the reference data from validated pathological endpoints. We found that AFB1 significantly disrupted production of SCFAs, secretion and metabolism of bile acids, absorption of LCFAs, catabolism of phenylalanine, and the metabolisms of pyruvic acid, amino acids, and carbohydrates. These changes are associated with the alterations of community structure. The pathways all have key positions in the global metabolism of gut-microbiota and host health. Hence, gut-microbiota may partially be involved in the pathological mechanism of AFB1-exposure induced adverse health outcomes in F344 rat model, and presumably also in humans. On the other hand, GTPs caused reduction of calorific carbohydrates, elevation of vitamin production, decreases of bile constituents, and modified metabolic pattern of amino acids in the gut of GTPs-treated SD rats. A further examination on the key differential metabolites indicated a boost of gut-microbiota dependent mitochondrial TCA/Urea cycle following GTPs administration. Based on previous microbiome data and clinical chemical analysis, we believe that such changes may be a major contributor to the anti-obesity function of GTPs
An investigation of programming and space : integrating skateboarding into public spaces to enhance the urban fabric by Henry Carter Ricks( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

As American cities continue to densify, it is paramount to create public spaces that reflect and welcome the diversity of urban life and the activities that foster community and culture; skateboarding is an element of that diversity but rarely accorded visibility. By a literature review that provides insight into historical context, theory of programming in urban space, and implications of skateboarding and design, and by investigating case studies that encompass the diversity of skateboarding spaces (formal and informal), I will create recommendations for integrating skateboarding into a successful multi-functional urban space. The goal of this research is to effectively create ways to achieve a blend of urban cultural activities, suited to a wide range of ages, abilities, and accessibilities, and successfully integrate these activities into designs for an urban plaza in the cultural hub of Memphis, TN
Metabolic engineering of a cellulolytic thermophile for renewable production of biofuels by Amanda Michele Willams-Rhaesa( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sustainable generation of liquid transportation fuels is critical to mitigate the environmental impacts of fossil fuels. Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive renewable resource but the natural recalcitrance of plant materials to enzymatic and microbial deconstruction must first be overcome. Costly pretreatment processing of the biomass and the addition of exogenous cellulase enzymes to release sugars are necessary. Microbes then utilize the sugars in standard industrial ethanol production. Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) has the potential to decrease the costs associated with the use of lignocellulosic feedstocks by combining biomass deconstruction and microbial conversion of cellulose and hemicellulose into ethanol all in one fermentation vessel. Cellulolytic thermophiles have been explored for use in this technology as their high growth temperatures facilitate breakdown of the plant material, and decrease the risk of contamination of fermentation vessels. Caldicellulosiruptor bescii (Topt 78℗ʻC) is the most thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium known and can utilize plant biomass without pretreatment. The recent development of a genetic system in this organism has greatly increased its potential utility for CBP. The goal of this research was to engineer C. bescii for maximum ethanol production. First, the limitations of growing wild-type C. bescii were explored on high concentrations of both a model substrate, crystalline cellulose (Avicel), and the real-world substrate, switchgrass. This study revealed that substrate utilization was limited by nitrogen availability and the production of>150 mM organic acids. Generation of a neutral product, such as ethanol, would alleviate this second limitation. Second, improvements were made to the genetics system, including the development of a more stable genetic background and also of a native xylose-inducible promoter, thereby expanding the genetic toolkit for this organism. Third, the more stable background was used for heterologous expression of a cytoplasmic bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase with and without a reduced ferredoxin NAD oxidoreductase. This six-subunit membrane-bound enzyme provides redox balance for ethanol production and allowed for the generation of a maximum of 75 mM ethanol from cellulose at 60℗ʻC. This is the highest ethanol production by C. bescii to date. These advancements bode well for the future use of C. bescii as a platform organism for biotechnology
Legionella pneumophila effector protein, legc3, manipulates eukaryotic membrane dynamics via lipid-binding and vesicle clustering activities by Shannon Melissa Lenz( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium that is also an accidental pathogen of human macrophages, and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Upon inhalation into alveolar macrophages, L. pneumophila is able to promote its own survival within the host macrophages through its ability to modify the normal phagolysosomal maturation pathway via its release of hundreds of different bacterial effector proteins. To better understand the activities of these secreted proteins on eukaryotic membrane dynamics, the ability of one such effector protein, LegC3, was studied, and it was shown to inhibit the homotypic fusion of vacuoles (lysosomes) from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LegC3 has previously been found to inhibit homotypic vacuole fusion in the S. cerevisiae model system. Now, my research shows that LegC3 strongly aggregates purified yeast vacuoles, providing a potential mechanism of fusion inhibition. Furthermore, LegC3 induced the clustering of vacuole-mimic protein-free liposomes. The occurrence of clustering of liposomes with defined lipid composition identified a potential interaction between LegC3 and the negatively-charged membrane phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, cardiolipin, and phosphatidic acid. Further work is ongoing to fully characterize this interaction between negatively-charged phospholipids and LegC3 and to assay the potential of LegC3:LegC3 interactions. Taken together, these results indicate that LegC3 likely interacts directly with negatively-charged membrane phospholipids to cause aggregation of vacuoles presumedly at the docking stage of membrane fusion. This vacuolar aggregation then prevents completion of membrane fusion. L. pneumophila may employ LegC3 during pathogenesis to alter normal eukaryotic membrane fusion pathways to allow for its survival
Mobile medical image sharing with blockchain by Zheliang Liu( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Importance of medical imaging has increased in modern healthcare system because it provides the capability of characterizing and visualizing pathological information on many diseases. An efficient, effective and secure system for sharing medical images can significantly contribute to modern healthcare. However, there are currently no integrated, reliable and secure medical image sharing platforms. In this thesis, a prototype of the medical image sharing system is proposed based on blockchain technology. The blockchain is often regarded as the base of all cryptocurrencies including bitcoin. But blockchain has not limited its functionality to cryptocurrency. The value of blockchain technology has been increasing since it was introduced. Blockchain has several outstanding attributes that provide security, anonymity and data integrity without any third-party organization involved. With the help of blockchain technology, I built a medical image sharing system that can maintain an immutable ledger recording all image sharing activities based on Blockchain technology
Pre-to-post-transplantation psychosocial functioning, health-related quality of life, and nonadherence in pediatric patients by Cyd Kumiko Eaton( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The goal of this study was to investigate differences in psychosocial functioning that occurred from pre-to-post transplantation and to identify pre-transplant psychosocial predictors of post-transplant health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and medication nonadherence in a sample of pediatric patients (ages 0-21 years) awaiting and eventually receiving a solid organ transplant. Patient, parent, and family factors were evaluated prior to transplantation at baseline (Time 1). Approximately 6 months after patients received a solid organ transplant, study measures were re-administered (Time 2). The final sample included 55 parents who completed data collection at both time points. Data were analyzed to 1) examine pre-to-post-transplant differences in patient health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and patient, parent, and family psychosocial functioning; and 2) identify pre-transplant psychosocial predictors of post-transplant HRQOL and medication nonadherence. Due to the large patient age range and the significant, inverse relationships between patients' ages at Time 1 and HRQOL at Time 2, a post-hoc investigation was conducted to further analyze how patients' ages potentially influenced HRQOL after transplantation. Results indicated that patients' HRQOL improved and parents' psychological distress decreased from pre-to-post-transplantation. Pre-transplant HRQOL emerged as the best predictor of post-transplant HRQOL for patients, with higher pre-transplant HRQOL predicting higher post-transplant HRQOL. Measurement issues prevented the valid assessment and analysis of medication nonadherence. The post-hoc investigation suggested that patients' ages at the time of the pre-transplant evaluation related to post-transplant HRQOL in several different ways. Results offer information that providers may use as psychoeducation for families during the pre-transplant evaluation. Results further suggest that there is clinical utility in evaluating patients' HRQOL at the pre-transplant evaluation to identify areas of psychosocial functioning that may benefit from targeted intervention to support better post-transplant HRQOL and adjustment. Lastly, patients' ages at the time of the pre-transplant evaluation may differentially influence post-transplant levels of HRQOL
 
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