WorldCat Identities

Baker, Meryl S.

Overview
Works: 14 works in 19 publications in 1 language and 27 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Meryl S Baker
Predictors of Performance in Navy Electronics Skills The Effect of Mathematical Skills by Meryl S Baker( Book )

3 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This effort is part of a project designed to identify mathematical requirements relevant to Navy electronics training. The relationship between mathematics ability and electronics performance in the Navy's Basic Electricity and Electronics (BE/E), Class 'A', and Class 'C' schools was examined to identify the mathematics skills required to complete Navy electronics training successfully and function adequately in electronics maintenance in the fleet. School performance measures were correlated with various predictor measures, and variables were analyzed to determine how they clustered together. Results showed that skills in mathematics knowledge are strongly related to success in electronics schools. (Author)
Strategy for Enlisting Lateral Entrants via Computer Technology (SELECT) An Automated System for Determining Rating and Pay Grade Qualification for Potential Navy Lateral Entry Accessions by Marc A Hamovitch( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

SELECT is a system designed to streamline the process of determining proper ratings and assigning pay grades to potential Navy lateral entry accessions, i.e., the enlistment of personnel with the appropriate training and qualifications as petty officers. It uses a cross-reference index to convert civilian occupations to Navy ratings that was developed in both manual and computerized versions. Qualification is based on training and/or work experience, physical and security characteristics, and separately developed skill tests. This report includes a summary of the problem, background and purpose of the project, a description of the system, and the recommendation that SELECT be evaluated in a context that requires users of varying sophistication to determine appropriate Navy ratings for applicants from a wide variety of civilian occupations. Appendices provide a brief description of APL functions, global variables, documentation of APL functions used in the computer versions, and the SELECT guide for both manual and computer procedures. Six references are listed. (Author/LMM)
Job-Oriented Basic Skills (Jobs) Program for the Acoustic Sensor Operations Str and by Paula Kabance U'ren( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An effort was undertaken to develop a job-oriented basic skills curriculum appropriate for the acoustic sensor operations area, which includes members of four ratings: ocean systems technician, aviation antisubmarine warfare operator, sonar technician (surface), and sonar technician (submarine). Analysis of the job duties of the four ratings revealed that sensor operations for acoustic analysis and continued on-the-job study are critical job requirements. The basic requirements for acoustic sensor operations consisted of skills in mathematics, reading, study skills, and memorization. The acoustic prerequisite requirements were skills in science, conceptual understanding of mechanical operations and relationships, and problem solving. Course objectives and instructional specifications were developed based upon the training requirements. (The seven-page narrative is followed by these appendixes: a sample job analysis survey; the basic skills survey; the acoustic prerequisite skills survey; terminal objectives and sample test items; and instructional specifications that detail, for each topic area, objectives, instructional media method, strategy specifications, instance specifications, and testing.) (Ylb)
Mathematical Requirements in Navy Class " a"Electronics Schools by J Sachar( Book )

2 editions published between 1980 and 1981 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Instructors in 14 Navy electronics 'A' schools (12 basic core and 2 advanced) were presented with a list of 70 mathematical skills and asked to indicate (1) how important they were to successful school performance and (2) whether they were prerequisite, reviewed, or taught in the 'A' schools. Also, they were asked to state the number and type of performance aids used in the course and during the exam. Responses showed that, of the 70 skills surveyed, 19 do not appear in any basic core course and 2 more do not affect performance. Although the skills rated as affecting performance are generally considered as prerequisite in all schools, many students require review in these skills for successful performance. Across all schools, the most important skills are (1) addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of numbers, (2) squares and square roots of positive numbers, (3) addition and subtraction of like units, (4) multiplication and division of like and/or unlike units, (5) substitution of known values into a given formula, and (6) transpositions of algebraic expressions. Performance aids are permitted in all courses but one, both during the course and during exams
Job-Oriented Basic Skills (Jobs) Training Program. an Evaluation by Meryl S Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Four training courses developed under the Job-Oriented Basic Skills (jobs) program were evaluated to determine whether they could compensate for the skill deficiencies of lower aptitude Navy personnel. The jobs program was designed for personnel who scored in the lower mental aptitude categories on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery to increase their mastery of the skills and knowledge deemed to be prerequisites for success in Class "a" technical schools. Volunteer recruits were randomly assigned to two groups: jobs direct-track and jobs delayed-track (completion of apprenticeship training and time in the fleet prior to jobs training). Control groups were also specified. Of 1,551 students who attended jobs school, 1,493 (96 percent) graduated. The jobs delayed-track group had a higher percentage of attrition from jobs school than did the jobs direct-track group. Class "a" school data for 1,256 jobs graduates showed that 996 (79 percent) graduated and 260 (21 percent) attrited. Comparable figures for the "a" school comparison group were 90 percent and 10 percent. Thirty-three months after jobs and comparison groups had graduated from "a" school, the "a" school group had over twice as many fleet discharges, thus reducing the total loss rate between the two groups to 3 percent. (Ylb)
The Evaluation of a Job-Oriented Basic Skills Training Program Interim Report, July 1979-July 1981 by Meryl S Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Job-Oriented Basic Skills (JOBS) program was evaluated to determine whether it could compensate for skill deficiencies of lower aptitude personnel so that they could successfully complete Navy technical schools and perform to standard in the fleet. JOBS curricula were developed for four content strands (aggregations of 12 Class "A" schools based on common content and prerequisite skill and knowledge requirements). Volunteer recruits (N=2212) were randomly assigned to two groups: JOBS direct-track, who entered JOBS training immediately following recruit training, and JOBS delayed-track, who first completed apprenticeship and time in the fleet. Data collected from the two groups were compared with that from a fleet control group with two "A" school-qualified groups who attended"A" school with the JOBS groups. The JOBS groups included twice as many minorities. There were no significant differences in test performance between JOBS direct- and delayed-track students. Overall attrition for JOBS groups from "A" schools was twice that for comparison groups. In general, JOBS students took longer to complete training and scored lower on end-of-course comprehensive tests. The JOBS program appeared to have potential for attenuating Navy technical manpower shortages and contributing to minority upward mobility. (YLB)
Mathematics Course Requirements and Performance Levels in the Navy's Basic Electricity and Electronics Schools. Technical Report, March 1980-December 1980 by Meryl S Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Instructors in the Navy's Basic Electricity and Electronics (be/e) schools were presented with a list of 70 mathematical skills and asked to indicate: (1) how important they were to successful be/e school performance, and (2) whether they were prerequisite, reviewed, or taught in the schools. Also, they were asked to state the number and type of performance aids used in the course and during the exam. Responses showed that, of the 70 skills surveyed, 21 were rated as affecting performance. Based on survey results, a mathematics test was developed to assess be/e student performance on skills rated as affecting performance, and administered to groups of students entering and graduating from be/e school. Results showed that student performance was marginal in most topic areas considered critical to course performance by instructors. This suggests that either the instructors overrated the importance of these skills or the criteria for successful be/e completion are too low. (Author)
Mathematics Requirements of Electronics Ratings in the Job Environment. Technical Report, February 1980-November 1980 by Meryl S Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fleet personnel in 10 electronics ratings were asked to indicate: (1) how often they used skills in 20 mathematics topics areas in performing their jobs, (2) the type of work engaged in when employing mathematics skills, (3) whether mathematics skills ability was helpful to job performance, and (4) whether they required mathematics skills not taught in school in doing their job. Results showed that, except for skills related to basic arithmetic, units, and conversions, the majority of respondents in all ratings surveyed did not use the skills listed during job performance. Across all ratings, 27% indicated a need for additional mathematics skills; and 67% indicated that mathematical knowledge was helpful during job performance. (Author)
Mathematics Curricula Requirements and Performance Levels in Navy Class "C"Electronics Schools. Technical Report, December 1, 1979-June 1, 1980 by Meryl S Baker( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Instructors of 41 Navy electronics "c" courses were presented with a list of 70 mathematics skills and asked to indicate: (1) how important they were to successful course performance, and (2) whether required skills were prerequisite to, reviewed in, or taught in the course. Based on results obtained, a mathematical skills test was developed for the "c" course for the Aviation Electrician's Mate and Avionic Technician (ae/av) ratings, and administered to entering and graduating students. Significant differences were found between the two groups on total test and in seven topic areas, most of which were taught during the course. Since student performance in both groups was only marginal in most topic areas considered critical for successful course performance, it is possible that either the importance of these skills is overrated or criteria for successful course completion are too low. (Author)
Mathematics Requirements of Electronics Ratings in the Job Environment( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Fleet personnel in 10 electronics ratings were asked to indicate (1) how often they used skills in 20 mathematics topic areas in performing their jobs, (2) the type of work engaged in when employing mathematics skills, (3) whether mathematics skills ability was helpful to job performance, and (4) whether they required mathematics skills not taught in school in doing their job. Results showed that, except for skills related to basic arithmetic, units, and conversions, the majority of respondents in all ratings surveyed did not use the skills listed during job performance. Across all ratings, 27 percent indicated a need for additional mathematics skills; and 67 percent, that mathematical knowledge was helpful during job performance. (Author)
Study to Assess Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) School Staff Time Available for Training Activities( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Recent budget cuts have prompted the United States Army to reduce the number of civilian training developers at TRADOC schools. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TRADOC staff remaining will have sufficient time and expertise to both instruct classes and develop training. A written questionnaire was distributed to 3,200 military and civilian instructors and training developers at 16 TRADOC installations. The adjusted response rate for the combined sites was 83% (2,644). Staff reported little problem with time or expertise availability to complete training activities over the past year. However, this response may merely reflect that the staff was not yet required to perform these activities. Recommendations were for TRADOC to determine what training development tasks were not being accomplished to ensure that a training evaluation system is in place to monitor any change in the caliber of training and suggestions for overcoming training deficiencies, should they develop. Survey, Training, Army, staff time, TRADOC, study
Mathematics Curricula Requirements and Performance Levels in Navy Class 'C' Electronics Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Instructors of 41 Navy electronics 'C' courses were presented with a list of 70 mathematics skills and asked to indicate (1) how important they were to successful course performance and (2) whether required skills were prerequisite to, reviewed in, or taught in the course. Based on results obtained, a mathematical skills test was developed for the 'C' course for the Aviation Electrician's Mate and Avionic Technician (AE/AV) ratings, and administered to entering and graduating students. Significant differences were found between the two groups on total test and in seven topic areas, most of which were taught during the course. Since student performance in both groups was only marginal in most topic areas considered critical for successful course performance, it is possible that either the importance of these skills is overrated or criteria for successful course completion are too low. (Author)
Designing segments for rules by Courseware Incorporated( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mathematics Course Requirements and Performance Levels in the Navy's Basic Electricity and Electronics Schools( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Instructors in the Navy's Basic Electricity and Electronics (BE/E) schools were presented with a list of 70 mathematical skills and asked to indicate (1) how important they were to successful BE/E school performance and (2) whether they were prerequisite, reviewed, or taught in the schools. Also, they were asked to state the number and type of performance aids used in the course and during the exam. Responses showed that, of the 70 skills surveyed, 21 were rated as affecting performance. Based on survey results, a mathematics test was developed to assess BE/E student performance on skills rated as affecting performance, and administered to groups of students entering and graduating from BE/E school. Results showed that student performance was marginal in most topic areas considered critical to course performance by instructors. This suggests that either the instructors overrated the importance of these skills or the criteria for successful BE/E completion are too low. (Author)
 
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English (19)