WorldCat Identities

Bieschke, Paul

Overview
Works: 89 works in 89 publications in 1 language and 2,426 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  Oral histories  Internet videos 
Classifications: E185.97, 973.04960730092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Paul Bieschke
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable John Lewis( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Civil rights leader and U.S. Congressman John Lewis was born on February 21, 1940 in Troy, Alabama. Without his family’s knowledge, Lewis became involved in the Civil Rights Movement as a student at American Baptist Theological Seminary where he joined SNCC. In February 1960, Lewis helped spark a successful sit-in movement at segregated lunch counters in Nashville. In 1961, Lewis volunteered to become a member of the Freedom Riders. He served as chairman of SNCC from 1963 to 1965. As Chairman, he met with President John F. Kennedy to discuss the planning of the March on Washington in 1963. Lewis was elected to his first governmental office in 1981, serving as an Atlanta City Council member until 1986. He was elected to represent Georgia's 5th Congressional District. Lewis was a member of the House Committee on Ways and Means, the Congressional Black Caucus, and the Congressional Committee to Support Writers and Journalists
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Charles Morrow, III( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

State representative Charles Gay Morrow III was born on July 21, 1956 in Chicago, Illinois. Morrow attended De La Salle High School and was an honor student despite suffering from a speech impediment. In 1974, he entered the Illinois Institute of Technology as one of only sixty-seven African American students. Upon graduation, Peoples Gas and the Coca-Cola Company hired Morrow where he worked for eighteen years. Morrow then joined the Metropolitan Sanitary District of Chicago, making him a viable political candidate. Morrow was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives in 1986 from the 26th District. Since then, Morrow acted as Chairman of the Appropriations-Public Safety Committee, Co-Chair of the Legislative Printing Unit and the Vice-Chairman of the Public Utilities Committee. On 1993, Charles Morrow married Sherri Harris. Morrow was also a participant in the National Conference of Black Legislators
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Robert L. Carter( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Federal judge and lawyer Robert Carter was born March 11, 1917, in Careyville, Florida. Carter earned his LL.M. degree from Columbia University in New York City. Studious and introspective, Carter excelled in school, skipping two grades and graduating from high school by the age of sixteen. Carter was drafted into the armed forces. Deeply affected by pervasive racial prejudice, Carter was hired as an assistant to NAACP lawyer Thurgood Marshall upon his return. During his tenure, Carter argued twenty-two cases before the U.S. Supreme Court— including Brown v. Board of Education in 1954—winning twenty-one of them. In 1972, Carter was appointed judge of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. He was an advocate of equal rights and made headlines decrying the racial prejudice plaguing the criminal justice system in the United States. Carter passed away on January 3, 2012 at age 94
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Haki Madhubuti( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Author and publisher Haki Madhubuti was born Don Luther Lee on February 23, 1942 in Little Rock, Arkansas. He received a M.F.A. degree at Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa. He served in the U.S. Army from 1960 to 1963. Madhubuti was curator at DuSable Museum of African History in 1963. During his years at the museum, Madhubuti met prominent forces in the African American arts community. He was encouraged to publish a collection of his poetry. The result, Think Black, appeared in 1966 and was entirely self-published. After promising book sales, Madhubuti realized independent publishing could be attained. Madhubuti and two partners launched the “Third World Press” in the basement of his Chicago apartment with a mimeograph machine. He became a prominent African American author without relying on established publishing companies. Madhubuti served as director of the Gwendolyn Brooks Center at Chicago State University
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Lorenzo Pace( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Artist Lorenzo Pace was born September 29, 1943 in Birmingham, Alabama. He moved to Chicago as a teenager, attending the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he graduated with both his B.F.A. degree and his M.F.A. degree. He went on to receive his Ph.D. degree in art education from Illinois State University in 1978. He lived in Paris for a year, and returned to Chicago interested in learning woodcarving. In 1993, Pace and his work gained national attention when he was commissioned to build a monument at New York City's Foley Square paying homage to the African slaves originally buried on that site. Throughout his career, Pace worked with a broad range of objects and materials. His sculptures, installations and performance art received international acclaim
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Peggy Cooper Cafritz( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Education chief executive and high school administrator Peggy Cooper Cafritz was born on April 7, 1947, in Mobile, Alabama. Cafritz attended George Washington University, where she earned her B.A. degree in political science and completed her J.D. degree. Cafritz became involved with education and the arts when, as a law student, she founded the Duke Ellington School of the Arts. Initially a summer arts workshop for minority children, the program was accepted into the District of Colombia Public Schools in 1974. From 1979 to 1987, she chaired the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and in 1993 President William J. Clinton appointed her vice chairperson of the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. She worked as a programming executive for Post-Newsweek and a documentary producer for WTOP-TV, earning both Emmy and Peabody awards for her documentary work. In 2000, Cafritz was elected president of the D.C. Board of Education
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Kerry James Marshall( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Painter Kerry James Marshall was born on October 17, 1955 in Birmingham, Alabama. He realized he wanted to be an artist at an early age. When Marshall was eight, his family moved to the Watts community in Los Angeles. As the epicenter of intense struggle for civil rights, Watts and its imagery dramatically influenced the form and content of Marshall's work. His celebrated series, "The Garden Project", critiqued low-income housing projects whose names denoted an idyllic, Eden-like world. Marshall received his training from Charles White while enrolled at the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles. Best known for his stylized, large-scale paintings depicting the beauty and complexity of African American life, Marshall also designs sculpture and served as a production designer for films. He was named the recipient of the prestigious MacArthur "Genius" Grant and his work was incorporated into the permanent collections of many museums across the nation
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Vy Higginsen( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Radio host and stage producer Vy Higginsen was born in Harlem, New York. Higginsen attended the Fashion Institute of Technology, but decided against entering the fashion industry. She was hired at Ebony magazine, becoming its first female advertising executive. She then worked as a contributing editor at Essence magazine. Higginsen became interested in radio and enrolled at a school for broadcasting. Radio personality Frankie Crocker recruited Higginsen to WBLS Radio and she became the first woman on primetime radio in New York. Higginsen and her husband, Ken Wydro, co-wrote and co-produced the musical “Mama, I Want to Sing,” debuting in 1983 and becoming the longest running black off-Broadway musical. Higginsen also co-wrote and produced sequel “Mama” musicals and was the first woman to produce a drama on Broadway when she produced Joe Turner’s Come and Gone. Higginsen founded the “Mama Foundation for the Arts”, a nonprofit arts organization in Harlem
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Ruth Love( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Educator and education advisor Ruth Love was born on April 22, 1939 in Lawton, Oklahoma. Love attended San Jose State University receiving her B.A. degree in education. She earned her M.A. degree from San Francisco State University in guidance and counseling. Love obtained her Ph.D. degree in human behavior and psychology from the United States International University in San Diego. Throughout Love's career in education she served as teacher, policymaker and administrator. From 1971 to 1975, Love worked as the director of the National Right to Read Program, creating reading and literacy programs for children and adults. She then served as superintendent in the Oakland and Chicago public schools systems. Love continued to contribute to the field of education through teaching, writing and consulting. She was the founder and president of RBL Enterprises, an educational consulting company. Love continued to be a formidable advocate for urban educational reform and improvement
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Roland Burris( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

State attorney general, state comptroller, and U.S. senator Hon. Roland Burris was born in Centralia, Illinois. He earned his B.A. degree in political science from Southern Illinois University in 1959. He stud earned his J.D. degree from Howard University in 1963. Burris was a federal bank examiner before holding several positions at the Continental Illinois National Bank and Trust Company (now Bank of America). In 1973, he was appointed director of the Illinois Department of General Services. In 1978, Burr was elected Comptroller of the state of Illinois, the first African American elected to statewide office. He served three terms before he was elected attorney general in Illinois in 1990. Burris returned to public service on December 30, 2008, when he was appointed by Governor Rod Blagojevich to the U.S. Senate, to fill the unexpired term of Senator Barack Obama, who resigned when he was elected President of the United States
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Frank K. Ross( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Financial consultant Frank Kenneth Ross was born in 1943 on the island of St. Kitts. After his father died, he and his siblings moved to the United States to live with an uncle in Yonkers, New York. Ross commuted 2 hours a day from Yonkers to take business courses at Long Island University. Brooklyn. After graduating, Ross worked at the accounting firm of Peat Marwick Mitchell, now KPMG, in New York while continuing at Long Island University for his M.B.A. degree. In 1973, Ross started his own practice, Ross, Stewart & Benjamin, and obtained a significant client base in a short period of time. However, he was lured back to KPMG in 1976 and within a year, Ross was promoted to partner, transferring to the Washington, D.C. office in 1979. Ross served as the KPMG Managing Partner for the MidAtlantic and Office Managing Partner in the Washington, D.C. office
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Reverend Dr. W. Wilson Goode, Sr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Politician W. Wilson Goode was born near Seaboard, North Carolina on August 19, 1938. His family moved to Philadelphia in 1954. He received his B.A. degree in political science from Morgan State University in 1961. In 1968, he earned his M.A. degree in governmental administration from the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania. In 1969, Goode was appointed executive director of the Philadelphia Council for Community Advancement. In 1979, the mayor of Philadelphia appointed Goode head of the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission. In 1980, he became the first African American appointed managing director of the City of Philadelphia. Goode was elected mayor of Philadelphia in 1983. He served two terms as mayor, leaving office in 1992. Goode received his D.Min. degree in May 2000. He hosted a radio show on WDAS, and held positions with the U.S. Department of Education. In 2000, he helped organize the Amachi Program for children of incarcerated parents
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Charisse R. Lillie( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lawyer Charisse Lillie was born on April 7, 1952 in Houston, Texas. In 1973, Lillie received her B.A. degree from Wesleyan University. She received her J.D. degree from Temple University in 1976 and her LL.M. degree from Yale University in 1982. Lillie's career included a professorship at Villanova University before embarking on a career in government service as assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (Civil Division) from 1985 to 1988, general counsel to the Redevelopment Authority of Philadelphia and as city solicitor for Philadelphia. In 1992, Lillie joined Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll where she served as partner and chair of the litigation department. Lillie was the recipient of numerous awards, including the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Award given by Philadelphia's Urban League. Lillie lectured and advised on issues of diversity, discrimination and affirmative action and served as chairperson of the board of the Federal Reserve Bank
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Gordon Parks( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Artist Gordon Parks, Sr. was born on November 30, 1912, in Fort Scott, Kansas, the youngest of fifteen children. Parks moved to Minnesota in 1926 after the death of his mother. While working on a train, he noticed a magazine with photographs from the Farm Security Administration (FSA), and decided to buy a used camera in 1938, deciding on a career in photography. In 1941, Parks received a fellowship to work at the photography section of the FSA. By the end of the 1940s, Parks was working with Life and Vogue magazines, and in that capacity did some of his most famous work. Branching out in 1963, Parks directed his first film, The Learning Tree. Parks went on to direct many films, including Shaft in 1971, and has composed music and written several books. Parks passed away on March 7, 2006, at the age of 93
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Oscar Brown, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Entertainer, music composer, and poet Oscar Brown, Jr., was born on October 10, 1926, in Chicago, Illinois. As an aspiring young playwright in 1960, Brown made an unprecedented two-hour appearance on NBC debuting the play he had written, Kicks & Company. Though the play never made it to Broadway, Brown had arrived. He began sharing the stage with such greats as Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane, Nancy Wilson and Cannonball Adderly. His London-based, two-hour, one-man show, "Oscar Brown, Jr. Entertains," led him to be hailed as a musical genius. He also made headlines with a project that worked effectively with local gang members, done in conjunction with his performance partner and wife, Jean Pace. Among their many discoveries were the Jackson Five. Brown composed several hundred songs and more than a dozen full-length feature pieces during his forty-year career. Oscar Brown, Jr. passed away on May 29, 2005 at age 78
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable John Conyers, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. was born in 1929, in Detroit, Michigan. He earned his B.A. and J.D. degrees from Wayne State University in Detroit. Conyers began his political career as an aide to Michigan Congressman John Dingell. In 1964, Conyers was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives on a platform of jobs, justice and peace. Social justice and economic opportunity were focal points of Conyers' political career. He was first African American leader on the U.S. House Judiciary Committee. Conyers attached crucial civil rights measures to the 1994 Omnibus Crime Bill, including the Racial Justice Act and the Police Accountability Act. Conyers generated the Justice Department's national study on police brutality, and conducted hearings in several cities on criminal justice matters. He was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus. Conyers, the longest-serving African American in the history of the U.S. House of Representatives, was also Dean of the House
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Emil Jones, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Illinois State Senator The Honorable Emil Jones, Jr. was born on October 18, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois. After serving as a volunteer for John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign and as assistant for Chicago Alderman Wilson Frost, Jones was elected as an Illinois State Representative in 1972. He held this position for ten years before moving to the Illinois Senate where he served from 1983 to 2009. In 2003, Jones was unanimously selected as Senate Democratic Leader. Jones served as an advocate for public schools, and supported groundbreaking legislation to guarantee a portion of state construction contracts to qualified minority entrepreneurs. For his efforts in civil rights legislation, Jones was recognized by numerous educational and labor organizations. He was a member of the National Conference of State Legislators and the National Black Caucus of State Legislators
The HistoryMakers video oral history with James Forman( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Activist James Forman was born on October 4, 1928, in Chicago, Illinois but spent much of his childhood with his grandmother on a farm in Marshall County, Mississippi. He graduated from Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois in 1957. During the late 1950s, Forman became involved in the civil rights movement, and in 1960, he joined the Congress of Racial Equality, providing relief services to sharecroppers in Tennessee who had been evicted for registering to vote. That same year, he met several of the Freedom Riders, who asked Forman to work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He served as SNCC’s executive secretary from 1964 to 1966, until he left SNCC in 1968 to assist in increasing the economic development opportunities for black communities. Remaining an activist, Forman served as president of the Unemployment and Poverty Action Committee. Forman passed away on January 10, 2005, at the age of 76
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Dr. Alvin Poussaint( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Psychiatrist and civic leader Dr. Alvin Poussaint was born in East Harlem, New York, on May 15, 1934. He received his M.D. from Cornell University, completing his residency in psychiatry at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and receiving his M.S. degree in 1964. Believing that racism was the core mental health problem for the African American community, Poussaint joined the civil rights movement in the South. He joined a team of healthcare professionals as the southern field director of the Medical Committee for Human Rights in Mississippi, helping desegregate healthcare facilities throughout the South. Later, he joined the staff of Tufts Medical School, where he served as director of the psychiatry program in a low-income housing project. In 1969, he joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School. He has served as media consultant for The Cosby Show and A Different World. Active with many organizations, Poussaint has written numerous articles and books
The HistoryMakers video oral history with William Warfield( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Opera singer and educator William Caesar Warfield was born on January 22, 1920 in West Helena, Arkansas. Warfield attended the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester, where he received his B.A. degree in music studies in 1942. He first acted in the Broadway show Call Me Mister, and was cast in 1948’s Set My People Free and 1950’s Regina. In 1950, Warfield was cast in the film adaptation of Show Boat and made his New York City Town Hall debut. In 1952, he starred in Porgy and Bess alongside his wife, opera legend Leontyne Price, and later toured internationally with the U.S. Department of State. Warfield also taught music at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Northwestern University. He received a 1984 Grammy Award in the spoken word category and served as president of the National Association of Negro Musicians. He passed away August 25, 2002
 
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English (20)