WorldCat Identities

Brown, Natalie Bullock

Overview
Works: 82 works in 118 publications in 1 language and 4,140 library holdings
Genres: Nonfiction films  Biography  History  Filmed panel discussions  Humor  Filmed speeches  Filmed lectures  Short films 
Roles: Producer
Classifications: E185.61, 323.1196073
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Natalie Bullock Brown
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference. "We had to be strong" by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 10: Not unexpectedly, some of the Southern Movement's most vivid stories are found in Mississippi. Panelist Lawrence Guyot, former Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), insists that Mississippi is the state that "made the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee." This panel features the first-person accounts of some of the Movement's most unsung heroes and heroines. The significance and impact of the MFDP forms an important part of the discussion
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 31: One third of the prison population is Black; one sixth is Latino. Seven million children have a parent in prison. Fourth grade reading scores are being used to project prison needs in some states. Every day 192 children are arrested for violent crimes; 393 are arrested daily on drug charges. This panel traces the path to prison that many minority children begin traveling in early childhood. Carmen Perez, now involved with The Gathering for Justice organized by Harry Belafonte, vividly portrays the gang world that surrounded her childhood in a community outside of Los Angeles, saying how "lucky" she was to have someone "invest" in her. The panelists discuss inspiration from SNCC in their efforts to tackle the issues confronting them today
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 5: Just 12 days after the Greensboro, North Carolina sit-in of February 1, 1960, students attending Shaw University and Saint Augustine College in Raleigh, North Carolina began sitting in at lunch counters. This panel of local leaders provides a close-up look at the sit-in movement in the city of SNCC's birthplace, and the segregation existing there in the 1940s and 50s
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conference proceedings of veteran and youth activists gathered at Shaw University in North Carolina to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organization which formed the vanguard of the Civil Rights Movement
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 7: This panel and audience discussion considers the complex response to SNCC by the general public and specific sections of society. SNCC's work inspired many students, and the organization found considerable support in groups like the National Student Association and the Students for a Democratic Society. Within this discussion, a larger question is also raised and considered: What should we do today?
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 9: At SNCC's 1960 founding conference, Ella Baker encouraged the students to recognize that their struggle was "bigger than a hamburger" in reference to the original narrow goals of desegregating lunch counters. As the students' consciousness deepened, SNCC took on broader issues of civil liberties, red baiting, the Vietnam War, women's issues, and in a large way embraced struggles for liberation and empowerment around the world. The panel begins with a discussion on the evolution of SNCC's organizing goals and concludes with a conversation on the need to stay engaged in contemporary political struggles
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 3: The most remarkable aspect of the civil disobedience and sit-ins of the 1960s was the leadership of young people. Importantly, young activists were challenging other young people to join them, and also challenging established civil rights organizations to speed up the pace of their efforts. Their commitment and energy led to the grassroots organizing work that defined the freedom movement of the 1960s. In this session, panelists discuss their deepening involvement with the Southern Movement as grassroots community organizers. Harry Belafonte makes an unscheduled appearance in the session
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 29: According to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, the first Black Attorney General of the United States, there is a "direct line" from the 1960 lunch counter sit-in that took place in Greensboro, North Carolina to the election of President Barack Obama in 2008. Both Holder and Mr. Obama are "beneficiaries" of SNCC's work. The Attorney General acknowledges that the United States still suffers from racial inequality in everything from unemployment rates to the length of prison terms. "There is still work to be done."
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 34: SNCC and the Southern Movement have lost a lot of important people over the years both from political assassinations and natural causes. Charles Sherrod's moving version of "One more time" incorporates the names and photos of heroes in a moving tribute to their work. Ella Baker's grandniece, Dr. Carolyn Brockington, discusses her "Aunt Ella." Constancia "Dinky" Romilly tells of the COINTELPRO poisoning of her husband, SNCC Executive Director, James Forman, and how he "healed himself." Historian Vincent Harding honors Howard Zinn who lost his job for pushing his students to challenge injustice and racism in society. Harding reluctantly accepted Zinn's faculty position
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 19: Over the years, the popular media has had a troubled relationship with organizations like SNCC. Hollywood film director Phil Alden Robinson maintains that a big challenge to producing freedom movement films for theatrical distribution is the assumption that the films won't sell overseas. The entertainment values that drive the news limit the depiction of day-to-day grassroots organizing to dramatic protests. However, "media" is no longer defined as exclusively Hollywood, network television or mainstream print media. "Young people especially", says photographer Maria Varela, "are not just cultural consumers but culture-makers."
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 1: SNCC Advisor, Timothy Jenkins opens the conference explaining that this is not simply a gathering of reminiscence, but a coming together to provide "missing chapters in history" to a new generation of freedom fighters. Following Jenkins is a vivid and substantive description of SNCC's birth and impact given by Professor Julian Bond, retired NAACP Board of Directors Chair, who participated in SNCC's 1960 founding conference. An important lesson that emerges from this opening session is that while SNCC Veterans do not define themselves as heroes and heroines, serious and effective struggle requires commitment, and commitment often involves risk
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 22: This panel looks critically at the challenges that women overcame to perform a range of work done for SNCC. Women stepped forward as never before in the ranks of civil rights organizations. "You went ahead and learned how to do it and did it," says one panelist. Ruby Doris Smith Robinson, the woman who actually ran SNCC is discussed; also the "profound" influence of Ella Baker
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 6: At SNCC's founding conference in 1960 it was Rev. James Lawson who captured the political imagination of the students. In this address Lawson outlines his belief in the continuing value and necessity of non-violent struggle for social change and justice. "The power and energy of the 1960s movement is needed for the 21st century,"
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference. "We knew that we were not free" by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 24: Though Black-led and powered by the energy of the Black population, Whites have always been part of the Southern Freedom Movement. Indeed, as all the panelists note, in its largest sense the southern struggle was not just for Black-only freedom. Three "White" organizations were of particular importance to SNCC: The Highlander Center founded in the 1930s to begin addressing the needs of poor Appalachian Whites embraced the civil rights struggle providing one of the few southern sites for integrated discussion and planning; the Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) which reflected a White southern radical organizing tradition and was one of SNCC's earliest supporters; and finally, the Southern Student Organizing Committee (SSOC), young White southerners who took seriously SNCC's call for Whites to organize White communities. The panel discusses the work of all these organizations as well as the remarkable success of the Washington, DC-based Jews for Urban Justice organization which also developed in response to SNCC's work
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 11: Lowndes County, Alabama, where SNCC consciously organized an independent Black political party in 1966, played an especially important role in for empowerment of Black citizens and the development of the organization. SNCC's success in Lowndes County --one of its least known achievements -- is discussed
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 16: SNCC's impact on elections across the nation is still little known, but the changes unfolding in the South helped accelerate an emerging black electoral surge in America. Ivanhoe Donaldson explains how Julian Bond's successful campaign for a seat in the Georgia state legislature resulted in a call for assistance from Richard Hatcher who would win his campaign to become Mayor of Gary, Indiana. Courtland Cox uses the "regime change" resulting from SNCC's work in Lowndes County, Alabama as a case study
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 33: "When you finally get a Black President you get a nice, polite, well-behaved educated one who ain't mad." Gregory was one of a handful of prominent entertainers who consistently supported SNCC. And he was one of the very few of this handful who regularly put his own life on the line. As he explains it: "I made all the money I needed to make, then I bumped into y'all and found out that there's another bank." Dick Gregory acknowledges recent progress in modern politics while addressing continuing problems
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conference proceedings of veteran and youth activists gathered at Shaw University in North Carolina to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), an organization which formed the vanguard of the Civil Rights Movement
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 17: Harry Belafonte challenges SNCC members to resist sinking into sentimentalism but instead ask "What can we do with our lives using that same kind of commitment and determination to continue the important work of transforming the United States into a 'more perfect' union?" Belafonte holds up his new organization, the Gathering for Justice, which consists of an intergenerational group of activists, as a model. He implores SNCC veterans to join the organization and ask themselves "Where are we, who are we talking to, and what are we talking about?"
SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)( Visual )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Volume 37: In 1960 as director of the SNCC's Mississippi Project, Bob Moses traveled to the South to try to register black voters. In 1982 he received a MacArthur Fellowship, and used the money to create the Algebra Project, a foundation devoted to improving minority education in math. "Lack of education" says Moses, was the "subtext" of the voting rights struggle. "We won the right to vote; the fight for public accommodations, but not education. And in that way, though Blacks are citizens, they are second class citizens." The current fight, Moses explains, is for quality public education as a constitutional right. He introduces Albert Sykes who began working with Moses in Jackson, Mississippi more than a decade ago
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.33 (from 0.32 for SNCC 50th ... to 0.33 for SNCC 50th ...)

Languages
English (40)