WorldCat Identities

Burghelea, Neculai

Overview
Works: 189 works in 190 publications in 1 language and 6,600 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  Oral histories  Internet videos 
Classifications: E185.97, 973.04960730092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Neculai Burghelea
The HistoryMakers video oral history with E. T. Williams( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Art collector and investment executive E.T. Williams was born on October 14, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York. Williams attended Brooklyn College and received his B.A. degree in economics in 1960. His professional career in finance began in 1968, joining the Maryland National Bank. In 1971, he returned to New York City, joining Chase Manhattan and working in institutional banking as a lending officer. Williams left banking in 1982 to become the Chairman of the Board and Head of the Fordham Hill Project, the largest eviction co-op conversion in the history of New York City. He retired in 1992 becoming Chief Executive Officer of Elnora, Inc., a private family investment company he started that holds and manages family assets including African American art, real estate, and investment portfolios. Williams owned the estate of Hale Woodruff and donated a sizeable portion of it to the Studio Museum in Harlem and other museums
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Photographer and civic activist Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe was born on July 9, 1951 in Chicago, Illinois. She graduated from Longwood Academy in 1969. Moutoussamy-Ashe attended the College of New Rochelle in New York and graduated with her B.F.A. degree from Cooper Union in 1975. In 1977, Moutousamy-Ashe married tennis legend, Arthur Ashe. She published her photo documentary, Daufuskie Island in 1981. In 1988, Arthur Ashe contracted the HIV virus from a contaminated blood transfusion. Moutoussamy-Ashe’s 1993 photography book, Daddy and Me illustrates the love between Ashe and his young daughter, Camera. In 1993, Moutoussamy-Ashe published Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers covering the years 1839 to 1985. Moutoussamy-Ashe was director of Arthur Ashe Endowment for the Defeat of AIDS and chairperson of Arthur Ashe Foundation. Her book of photographs, The African Flower: The Singing of Angels was published in 2001. That same year, she hosted the documentary, Crucible of the Millennium broadcast nationwide by PBS
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Randolph Michael McLaughlin( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Civil rights lawyer Randolph McLaughlin was born on June 9, 1953 in East Elmhurst, New York. After being inspired by one of his teachers, McLaughlin decided to dedicate his life to civil rights work. He graduated from Newton High School in 1967. After earning his B.A. degree from Columbia University and his law degree from Harvard Law School, McLaughlin joined the staff of the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York in 1978 and was mentored by William Kunstler. McLaughlin’s civil rights work ranged from representing African Americans against the Ku Klux Klan to challenging electoral district laws. He served as a professor of law at Pace University where he served as the director of the Social Justice Center. In 2001, McLaughlin began serving as counsel to the board of directors of Hale House in New York City. In 2004, he was named executive director where he continued to serve the community
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Jolette Westbrook( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lawyer and government administrator Jolette Ann Westbrook was born on December 10, 1956 in Buffalo, New York. Westbrook attended St. Joseph’s High School and graduated in 1974. At Russell Sage College, Westbrook graduated with her B.S. degree in criminal science in 1978. She attended Northeastern University Law School and earned her J.D. degree in 1981. In 1982, Westbrook joined the Supreme Judicial Court Bar and began working for the National Institute for Paralegal Studies as an instructor. She joined the firm of Dawkins and Quarles in 1983 and in 1985 handled over 200 tax cases for the Massachusetts Division of Employment Security. Westbrook became managing attorney for the Southeastern Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation. From 1991, Westbrook worked at the Department of Public Utilities and was the Director of the Energy Facilities Siting Division of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In 2005, she was appointed a member of the Massachusetts Judicial Nominating Committee
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Ernesta G. Procope( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Corporate executive Ernesta G. Procope was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1931. President and Chief Executive Officer of E. G. Bowman, a private insurance company, Procope made history in 1979 when she relocated the business from its Brooklyn storefront to 97 Wall Street. The E.G. Bowman Company became the first African American owned business to be located on Wall Street. Procope became the broker of record for the New York City Housing Authority and the insurance broker for the construction of the United States’ portion of the Alaska Pipeline. Licensed in all 50 states, the company counts IBM, Avon Products, Philip Morris Companies, General Motors and Time Warner among its client base. Procope was also the founder and president of Bowman Specialty Services, LLP. This extension of her business provided engineering and safety services. Procope was married for over 40 years to John Procope
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Shirley Ann Jackson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Physicist and university president Shirley Ann Jackson was born on August 5, 1946 in Washington, DC. Attending Roosevelt High School, she took accelerated math and science classes graduating as valedictorian in 1964. In 1973, Jackson graduated from MIT with her Ph.D. degree in theoretical elementary particle physics as the first African American woman to receive a Ph.D. in MIT’s history. Jackson became a research associate in theoretical physics at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Jackson was appointed professor of physics at Rutgers University. In 1980, she became president of the National Society of Black Physicists. In 1985, Jackson was a member of the New Jersey Commission on Science and Technology. In 1995, she was appointed by President Bill Clinton to chair the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In 1997, Jackson led the formation of the International Nuclear Regulators Association. In 1998, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame. She also served as president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Simon Estes( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Opera singer Simon Estes was born on March 2, 1938, in Centerville, Iowa. Estes was the youngest of three siblings. Raised in a spiritually-centered family, Estes sang in his church choir as a young boy and continued throughout his youth. Estes began his university career as a pre-med student in 1957, at the University of Iowa. Upon graduating from the University of Iowa, Estes enrolled in the Julliard School of Music in 1964. In 1965, Estes made his professional debut at the Deutsche Opera in Berlin in the role of Ramfis in Aida. Some of his most memorable operatic performances have been performing for Archbishop Desmond Tutu in Cape Town, South Africa, and in the Flyin Dutchman and Porgy and Bess. Estes worked also as a voice, humanities, and foreign language professor at Iowa State University, Boston University, and Wartburg College. He is married to Ovida Strong
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Lorenzo Morris( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Professor Lorenzo Morris was born on October 27, 1946 in Poughkeepsie, New York. After high school, Morris entered Fisk University before continuing his studies at Oberlin College and Yale University. He attended the University of Chicago earning his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in political science. He taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was a Brookings Institution research fellow and worked as a senior fellow at the Institute for the Study of Educational Policy. Morris chaired the Political Science Department at Howard University, and was an author and consultant on international and public policy and electoral issues. Morris served as a commentator for television and radio and authored books and journal articles. He acted as co-director of the Census Information Center at Howard University, served as president of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and was vice-chair of the University Senate and president of Phi Beta Kappa at Howard University
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Charles Yancey( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

City administrator and labor leader Charles Calvin Yancey was born on December 28, 1948 - the sixth of nine children of Howell Yancey, Sr. and Alice W. Yancey. He graduated from Boston Technical High School in 1965. Yancey received his B.S. degree in economics from Tufts University in 1970 and his M.A. degree in public administration from Harvard University in 1991. First elected to Boston’s City Council in 1983, he served for twenty-three years. Yancey championed equal employment opportunities for “people of color” in Boston’s city government and was a constant force to improve educational resources for public schools. He held an annual book fair that provided over 100,000 free books for Boston children since its inception in February 1987. Yancey also served as president of the Boston City Council in 2001 and the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials in 1999
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Abiodun Oyewole( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Poet Abiodun Oyewole was born Charles Davis on February 25, 1948 in Cincinnati, Ohio. He attended a college in North Carolina where he earned his B.A. degree. He went on to earn his Ph.D. degree from Columbia University in New York City where he served as a faculty member. Oyewole was a founding member of the American musical spieling group, The Last Poets. On May 19, 1968, the anniversary of Malcolm X’s birthday, Oyewole and two others, David Nelson and Gylan Kain, read poetry in tribute to Malcolm X at a memorial for him, and the group was born. In 1970, The Last Poets were signed by jazz producer Alan Douglas and released their first album which includes their classic poem Niggers are Scared of Revolution. The Last Poets' spoken word albums foreshadowed the work of rap groups like Public Enemy and Dead Prez. The Last Poets performed at Lollapalooza in 1994
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Lynn Nottage( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Playwright Lynn Nottage was born on November 2, 1964 in Brooklyn, New York. She graduated from New York’s High School of Music and Art in Harlem where she earned her diploma in 1982. That same year, she enrolled at Brown University where she received her B.A. degree in 1986. Nottage continued her studies, receiving her M.F.A. degree in playwriting at Yale School of Drama in 1989. In 1993, her short play Poof! premiered at the Actors Theater in Louisville, Kentucky where it won the Heideman Award. In 1996, the Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago produced her play, Crumbs from the Table of Joy, in its family outreach series. In, 2003, her drama, Intimate Apparel, won the New York Drama Critics Circle Awards, the Francesca Primus Prize and the Steinberg Award. Nottage’s plays were produced worldwide
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Theodore V. Wells, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Litigator Ted Wells was born Theodore V. Wells, Jr. on April 28, 1950 in Washington, D.C. Wells became known for his academic focus, and by the time he attended Coolidge High School, was known for his grades and his football-playing prowess. In 1968, he attended the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts, along with classmate, Supreme Court Justice, Clarence Thomas. In 1972, he received his B.A. degree. Wells then attended Harvard Law and Harvard Business School simultaneously, receiving both his J.D. and MBA degrees in 1976. Wells joined the Lowenstein Sandler law firm in New Jersey and did pro bono criminal defense work. In 1987, he successfully defended Raymond Donovan, the U.S. Secretary of Labor, his first high profile case. By the 1990s, Wells had a rapidly growing profile as an attorney. He later defended many major employers, including Johnson & Johnson and the Mitsubishi Corporation, as well as Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, Scooter Libby
The HistoryMakers video oral history with William M. Lewis, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Corporate executive and investment banker William M. Lewis, Jr. was born on April 30, 1956 in Richmond, Virginia. Growing up in the inner city, Lewis earned a scholarship to Andover Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. In 1974, Lewis was accepted to Harvard University where he received his B.A. degree in economics in 1978 and his M.B.A. degree from Harvard Business School in 1982. He was hired at Morgan Stanley’s mergers and acquisitions department as an associate where he spent six years working on corporate buyouts. Lewis then worked as a department head for Morgan Stanley’s Mergers and Acquisitions department before becoming managing director. In 2001, Lewis was named Global Banking co-managing director at Morgan Stanley. In 2004, Lewis joined Lazard, an asset and advisory firm, as co-chairman of investment banking. Lewis was active as a civic and community leader. He co-chaired the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Foundation
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Walter L. Gordon, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lawyer Walter L. Gordon Jr. was born on June 22, 1908 in Santa Monica, California. He graduated from Ohio State University with both his B.A. and J.D. degrees. In 1936, when the Los Angeles legal system was plagued by segregation, Gordon became one of the city’s first African American attorneys when he established his law practice in the same facility as one of Los Angeles’ oldest African American publications, The California Eagle. As a neighbor of the newspaper, he began collecting photographs given to him by the newspaper’s editor. Gordon amassed a photograph collection including valuable photographs of the Langston Law Club, composer Count Basie and musician Louis Armstrong. In 2003, he was awarded the Shattuck-Price Outstanding Lawyer Award from the Los Angeles County Bar Association. In 2004, he retired after over sixty years of practicing law. Gordon passed away on April 16, 2012 at age 103
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Academic administrator and osteopathic physician Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee was born in Detroit, Michigan on June 1, 1942. Unlike her sister, entertainer Diana Ross, she studied biology and chemistry at Wayne State University and then attended Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. After graduation, she opened a family practice in Detroit. Ross-Lee left private practice and became a professor at Michigan State. In 1992, Ross-Lee became associate dean for health policy in the College of Osteopathic Medicine, and in 1993, she was named Dean of Ohio University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. She was the first African American female to be dean of a medical school and one of only a handful of female deans in the country. After her career in Ohio, Ross-Lee moved to the New York Institute of Technology and became Dean of the school’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. She lectured extensively and published more than thirty scholarly articles
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Merton Simpson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Painter Merton Daniel Simpson was born on September 20, 1928 in Charleston, South Carolina. Simpson began drawing after being hospitalized with diphtheria as a child. During his formative years, Simpson worked at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, South Carolina, and after moving to New York in 1942, Simpson began his studies at Cooper Union and at New York University. From 1951 to 1954, he served as the U.S. Air Force's official artist. In 1954, Simpson opened a gallery on Madison Avenue, which featured African art and modern art, and became known throughout the world as one of the preeminent dealers of African art. In 1995, the Gibbes Museum presented a retrospective exhibition and published a catalogue entitled, Merton D. Simpson, The Journey of an Artist. The Studio Museum in Harlem honored Simpson in 2002 for his work as an artist and humanitarian
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Deborah A. Batts( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. District Court Judge Deborah A. Batts was born on April 13, 1947 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She earned her B.A. degree in government from Radcliffe College in 1969; and graduated from Harvard Law School in 1972. Batts then worked at the corporate law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore before becoming an assistant U.S. attorney for the southern district of New York in 1979. In 1984, she became the first African American faculty member at Fordham University’s School of Law. In 1994, Batts was named U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York by President Clinton. She oversaw a number of high profile cases, including the trial of al-Qaeda co-founder Mamdouh Mahmud Salim and the widely publicized case against EPA Chief Christine Todd Whitman. Batts is active in the New York City Bar Association, Metropolitan Black Bar Association and Lesbian and Gay Law Association of Greater New York
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Ophelia DeVore( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Model agency founder and newspaper publisher Ophelia DeVore was born on August 12, 1922, in Edgefield, South Carolina. She graduated from Hunter College High School and attended New York University, where she studied mathematics and languages. After having attended the Vogue School of Modeling in New York, DeVore became one of the first African American models in the America in 1938 at the age of sixteen. In 1946, she founded the Grace Del Marco Modeling Agency and in 1948, she opened the Ophelia DeVore School of Self-Development and Modeling. Thousands of people were nurtured by her agency including Diahann Carroll, Barbara McNair, Cicely Tyson, and Richard Roundtree. In addition to her modeling agency, she owned The Columbus Times, a Georgia-based newspaper begun by her second husband, the late Vernon Mitchell. DeVore lived in New York with her family, before passing away on February 28, 2014
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Kevin Clash( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Puppeteer Kevin Clash was born September 17, 1961, in Dundalk, Maryland. Clash was inspired by Sesame Street to create his own puppets. His first work on television was for a show entitled Caboose. In 1979, Clash became a puppeteer for Captain Kangaroo, a role he would perform until 1985. Clash joined the cast of The Great Space Coaster in 1981. In 1984, Clash began working full time for Sesame Street, and in that same year Clash created the popular Elmo character. He became a puppeteer for a variety of Jim Henson projects in the late 1980s, including The Jim Henson Hour, Muppet Time and Dog City. The following year, Clash portrayed the character Splinter in the film Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. In 1990, Clash won the first of nine Daytime Emmy Awards for his work on Sesame Street. In 2006, Clash released a biography entitled, My Life as a Furry Red Monster
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Bishop Barbara Harris( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bishop Barbara Clementine Harris was born on June 12, 1930 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She graduated from Philadelphia High School for Girls in 1948 and attended the Charles Morris Price School of Advertising and Journalism. Harris also studied at Villanova University and the Episcopal Divinity School. In 1958, she became the president of Joseph Baker and Associates, a black-owned public relations firm. Harris was a member of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, Union of Black Episcopalians, and the Pennsylvania Prison Society. She volunteered with Delta Ministries in Greenville, Mississippi, in 1964. Harris was ordained in 1980 and served as priest of St. Augustine of Hippo Church and chaplain of Philadelphia County Prison. In 1984, she was appointed executive director of the Episcopal Church Publishing Company. Harris became the first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion when she was ordained the Bishop Suffragan of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts in 1989
 
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Languages
English (21)