WorldCat Identities

Delgado-Romero, Edward

Overview
Works: 8 works in 8 publications in 1 language and 8 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Edward Delgado-Romero
A bilinear and three-dimensional model of acculturation for Puerto Ricans living in Central Florida by Cristalis Capielo( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Counselors' experiences working with undocumented clients in the new Latino south : a multiple case study by Carissa Noemi Balderas( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There is a significant disparity in mental health care for undocumented Latinos living in the U.S (Alegría et al., 2002; Perez & Fortuna, 2005; Coffman & Norton, 2010). A significant barrier to services for this population is a lack of culturally competent providers who can meet their mental health needs (Perez & Fortuna, 2005). There is currently a gap in the literature regarding the training, resources, and support that the counselor's who work with this population need in order to provide this care. Therefore, the purpose of this multiple case study was to gain an in-depth understanding of the lived experiences of five counselors who are currently working with undocumented Latino clients within the context of a Latino-serving community-counseling center in the New Latino South. Data collection in this study included focus groups, individual interviews, and document review. The study was informed by LatCrit theory (Iglesias, 1997), in order to intentionally recognize the racism and discriminatory laws and policies that impact the mental health care of undocumented Latinos. Thematic analysis was used in order to identify primary themes for each individual counselor's experience and then all cases underwent cross-case analysis. The following themes were explored: counselors' educational and training experiences, counselors' clinical experiences in session with undocumented clients, how systemic factors impact counselors' clinical experiences, and the personal impact of this work on counselors. The themes identified through this study have implications for clinical practice and further research with undocumented Latino clients
How perceptions of public policy and media depictions of undocumented immigrants relate to well-being by Beth Lauren Perlman( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There is a dearth of literature regarding the psychological impact of oppressive sociocultural structures and attitudes related to immigration on various racial and ethnic groups, especially for Latinx individuals and communities. The current research investigated how peoples' perceptions of and exposure to immigration policy and media depictions affect perceived stress, self-efficacy, and beliefs of meritocracy. Participants were recruited from a student research pool in a Southeastern College of Education at a public university and, because Latinx are frequently targeted in immigration policy and messages, a nationwide sample was also recruited. A multivariate linear regression model was implemented to explore the relationship between the different variables. The findings show that the participants who reported more exposure to hostile media depictions about immigrants experienced higher levels of stress and fewer merit-based beliefs. Participants who demonstrated increased emotional reactivity to restrictive immigration policies also showed increased stress levels and less merit-based beliefs. The findings have implications for mental health providers and political actors who work with Latinx clients as well as for educations who train future instructors. Ultimately, the findings underscore the importance of the role of psychologists in not only serving individuals, but also in challenging system inequities and training future educators to incorporate a social justice paradigm into teaching preparation programs
Success, transformation, and service : a critical race inquiry into the experiences of successful post-collegiate black men by Erin Nicole-Saddler Unkefer( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Psychological research has often used a deficit model to understand the mental health of Black Americans. Specifically, in social science research Black men have often been portrayed as unmotivated, underachieving and violent (Harper, 2012). This study used a strengths-based approach to explore the lives of successful Black men. The purpose of this study was to investigate successful, post-collegiate Black men's conceptualization of success through an exploration of transformative moments in their lives. Additionally, the purpose of this study is to understand how participants articulate communalism, or being of service, which is a core, strengths-based value for many in the Black community (Moemeka, 1998). Participants of this study were eleven Black male alumni members of a leadership academy that highly values service and achievement. Narrative inquiry and critical race theory informed the qualitatively constructed dialogues and thematic analysis presented. This study described a variety of people (including mentors, parents/caregivers, peers and public figures) and opportunities (such as attending rigorous schools and extracurricular engagement) that shaped participants' success. Additionally, participants discussed the importance of communalism in their lives described as being motivated by ancestral history and a sense of responsibility to Black male youth. Implications for Black male mental health and the field of counseling psychology are explored
Psychological factors in determining the allocation of a scholarship for eating disorder treatment by Melissa Ann Will( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Eating disorders can have deleterious effects on both an individual's body and mind. Additionally, the cost of treatment can be steep, often preventing individuals from receiving adequate, consistent, and necessary care. A non-profit organization in the southeastern United States has dedicated efforts to fully funding individuals through eating disorder-inpatient treatment, and accepts applications from individuals around the country. Funding recipients are then financially supported at an approved treatment site for as long as they need. As the financial need of applicants can range from a few hundred dollars to upwards of one-hundred-thousand dollars, the non-profit is limited in the number of scholarships they can provide at any given time. The application process is multi-level, and largely consists of measures self-created by the non-profit organization. There are also three validated measures included: Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire, Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV, and University Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether the non-profit based funding decisions on data collected from the three validated measures. This was examined through three hypothetical decision-making models. The three hypothetical models were: Egalitarian Model, Least Severe Model, and Blended Model. Hypothetical funding recipients were selected from each model and compared to the two actual funding recipients. The non-profit aimed to use a Blended Model. Results indicated that those chosen by the non-profit were not selected based on the three validated measures as demonstrated through the three hypothetical decision-making models. The allocation of scarce resources demonstrates to be a challenge on any level, and understanding the decision-making process can further inform organizations on the effectiveness and consistency of their procedures. Implications for practitioners working with eating disorder clients, limitations, and recommendations for future research are discussed
Resilience, civic engagement, cultural values, perceived discrimination and the unique mental health needs of DACA eligible Mexican immigrants by Jennifer Nicole Merrifield( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mexican immigrants continue to comprise a large portion of the minority population in the United States, yet they remain underrepresented across all sociopolitical domains, including behavioral healthcare and mental health research. This study documents the experiences of Mexican-origin immigrants who are eligible for, or currently enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Qualtrics was used to collect data via online questionnaires completed by 95 adults across the country. Direct and indirect relationships between resilience, perceived ethnic discrimination, civic engagement, and cultural values were examined. An additional aim of this study was to explore the psychological needs of participants and their communities. Therefore, respondents also completed a mental health needs assessment. Initial regression analyses revealed perceived ethnic discrimination and Mexican American cultural values served as significant predictors of resilience. Perceived discrimination was not significantly correlated with resilience; thus, no predictive relationships were found. Familismo accounted for most of the variance in the model among cultural values in predicting resilience. Civic engagement and familismo were the only significant predictors of resiliency in this sample. In addition, two significant interaction effects were found. The first revealed that religious cultural values strengthened the predictive effects of civic engagement on resilience. The second interaction showed that as levels of perceived discrimination levels increased, the relationship between familismo and resilience became stronger. The highest endorsed mental health concerns were Fear of Deportation, Experiencing Discrimination/Racism, Problems regarding Career Choice, and Nervousness. Results of this study lend support for therapeutic efforts that foster familismo values and civic engagement behaviors. In addition, DACA eligible Mexican immigrants may benefit from discussing perceived discrimination with mental health providers
Sociocultural values and gender role orientation in gender role conflict with a sample of Latina college students pursuing higher education at a Hispanic serving institution by Marta J Gonzalez( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The current study examined the relationship between sociocultural values (e.g., marianismo, familism, ethnic identity) and female gender-role orientation (e.g., femininity/masculinity) in gender-role conflict amongst Latina college students (N = 260) in higher education at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) in the Western United States. The results indicated that Mexican American Latina College students who endorsed gender role attitudes of marianismo and adhered to the cultural value of familism experienced higher levels of gender-role conflict. Particularly, individuals who endorsed more marianismo experienced conflict with restrictive affectionate behavior (i.e., discomfort expressing feelings to another person) and individuals who adhered to familism experienced more conflict with success, power, and competition. Findings also indicated that ethnic identity was significantly and positively correlated to familism and gender-role orientation indicating that having a salient identification with the ethnic group can influence gender-role orientation and adherence to the cultural value of familism. Correspondingly, individuals who endorsed masculinity experienced higher levels of conflict with success, power, and competition and those who endorsed femininity experienced less conflict in expressing emotions and affection for others. Implications of the research and recommendations for future research are discussed
The perceived legitimacy of hazing behavior scale : a construct validation study with NCAA collegiate coaches by Lauren Elizabeth Bigham( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Hazing continues to persist within college sports despite associated risks and negative consequences. Although a growing amount of research exists on the prevalence, nature, and perceived rational for hazing as reported by student-athletes (Allen & Madden, 2008; Allen & Madden, 2012; Hoover, 1999), relatively less research has been conducted on coaches and their attitudes towards hazing. Given the influential nature of coaches' attitudes on team climate and athletes' behavior (Johnson, 2009; Kavussanu, Roberts, & Ntoumanis, 2002; Kowalski & Waldon, 2010; Ommundsen et al., 2003), the purpose of the present study focused on further evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Perceived Legitimacy of Hazing Behavior (PLHB) Scale, a quantitative measure designed to assess coaches' perceptions of legitimacy towards sport-related hazing behavior. With an evolved understanding of coaches' perceptions of hazing, key organizations and personnel may be better informed when developing interventions and programming. This study utilized a quantitative, non-experimental, survey-based research design with stratified cluster sampling and online data collection. Data analysis included 302 NCAA Division I, II, and III college coaches from across the United States. In addition to assessing discriminant validity by exploring the potential impact of social desirability bias as measured by the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, Form X1, the construct validity of the PLHB Scale was examined with exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Scale reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. Following data collection and after item parceling, data transformation, and the deletion of item parcel six, an EFA utilizing principal-axis factoring identified a unidimensional factor structure that accounted for 79.86% of the variance. The model appeared to be a good fit and well defined with strong factor loadings and high communalities. In addition to good reliability (.95), the PLHB Scale demonstrated favorable discriminant validity when compared with the MCSDS-X1. While the PLHB Scale continued to demonstrate promising psychometric properties with regards to reliability and construct validity, additional research is needed to confirm the factor structure as well as to establish convergent validity. Additional research implications are discussed, strengths and limitations are reviewed, and recommendations for future research are presented
 
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