WorldCat Identities

Dennis, Nancy

Overview
Works: 23 works in 26 publications in 1 language and 41 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor
Classifications: LB1044.75.Z9, 362.120941
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Nancy Dennis
Conference on Video Recording for Educational Uses : July 19-22, 1977, Airlie, Virginia : [the report] by Conference on Video Recording for Educational Uses( Book )

2 editions published between 1977 and 1978 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Towards evaluation of health centres : a commentary on research needs of health centres and associated problems of group practice by Nancy Dennis( Book )

2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examining Age Differences in the Influence of Schematic Information on Retrieval Success by Christina Webb( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Schemas act as memory mechanisms that allow one to build frameworks in order tosupport memory through the use of gist information. This gist information can be especiallybeneficial to older adults in supporting successful memory. The current study sought to usenaturalistic scenes in order to investigate age-related changes in the neural basis of true memoriesfor information that was inherently tied to the scene's schema compared to that which was notrelated to the schema. During encoding, participants viewed schematic scenes (e.g., Christmas,bathroom, camping) and were tested on their memory for the content of the scene, includingtargets that were related (e.g., toilet) and unrelated (e.g., vase) to its theme. Analyses focused onboth similarities and differences in neural recruitment supporting memory for items related andunrelated to the schema. Correct responses to both schematically-related items and to items thatwere not related to the schema (non-schematic) were associated with increases in neural activityin the typical retrieval success network in younger adults, but a very limited network in olderadults. A direct comparison between retrieval of schematic vs. non-schematic items found greateractivity in bilateral visual and occipito-temporal regions, including the medial temporal lobe,indicating automatic recapitulation of items in the scene along with their surrounding schematiccontexts. Additionally, results revealed greater activation in prefrontal and parietal regionsassociated with decision-making, evaluation and attention, when comparing non-schematicretrieval with schematic retrieval. Older adults showed evidence of a reliance on the schemawhen comparing schematic and non-schematic retrieval, with greater activation in middle andsuperior temporal gyri. However, the reverse contrast revealed very limited activation, limitingthe age comparison analysis. Thus, the discussion focuses on interpretation of the younger adultresults, as well as additional functional connectivity analyses
Applying Mental Brakes : an fmri Analysis of Prepotent Motor Response Suppression by Alexandra Manbeck( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The utilization of fMRI research has become essential in studying the regions of the brain responsible for motor inhibition. Despite the wealth of published research on the locations for motor inhibition control, little to no data describes how motor inhibition proficiency influences the activation within motor control regions. This study examines the effect of individual differences in inhibition proficiency on the neural regions activated during a Go/No-go task to investigate how individual motor inhibition skill correlates with increased or decreased neural activity. The results revealed five areas of the brain that show increased activation as individual performance improves, including the bilateral superior frontal gyrus and the bilateral middle frontal gyrus, regions known for their role in motor inhibition. In addition, the activity in the putamen, a region responsible for neural connectivity during motor inhibition, narrowly escaped threshold for increased activation (12 voxels). This information will contribute to the concept of the brain-behavior relationship of inhibition control
Recognition memory for identical, morphed, and new faces by Ethan Zimmerman( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An fMRI investigation of category-specific episodic encoding by Jonathan Harris( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Determining whether certain categories of words have discrete neural representations (processing dedicated to different brain regions) is the pursuit of this thesis. Twelve participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to discriminate between the neural correlates of words representing either animals or objects during episodic encoding. Consistent with semantic retrieval studies, neural activity associated specifically with objects was encoded predominantly in the posterior portion of the left hemisphere: the superior frontal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, posterior cingualte cortex, occipitotemporal cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex. Activity associated specifically with animals, however, was encoded predominantly in anterior portion of the right hemisphere: the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), medial prefrontal cortex, and the posterior midline. Although the regions for animal activity are inconsistent with previous studies, data show that each category exhibits its own processing regions, suggesting that category specificity occurs not only during semantic retrieval, but also during episodic encoding of words
William J. Oswald (1919-2005) by Nancy Dennis( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The effect of increased memory cue duration on directed forgetting performance in healthy aging by Courtney Allen( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A joint technical document concerning the people centred issues of injuries by Nancy Dennis( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ask the patient : new approaches to customer feedback in general practice by Nancy Dennis( Book )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Quality contracts : the patient's view by Lisa Loughlin( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Recall-to-reject : Aging effects on the neural correlates of recollection rejection by Caitlin Bowman( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Maintaining accurate memory depends on both the ability to recognize old information and the ability to reject new information that has not been previously encountered. Research has shown that it is difficult to reject new information that bears resemblance to previously encountered information and individuals instead often falsely identify such new information as old. It has been posited that in the case of high relatedness between new and old information, recalling elements of old information can facilitate the rejection process as inconsistencies between new and old information can be identified. Recalling studied information to facilitate rejection of new items at retrieval has been termed 'recollection rejection' and is an excellent strategy for suppressing false memories. Despite the fact that recollection rejection is posited to engage a mechanism similar true recollection, previous neuroimaging studies have not evaluated to the overlap between the neural correlates of true recollection and recollection rejection. Thus, the present study sought to evaluate the neural basis of recollection rejection within a perceptual false memory paradigm. Results demonstrated that recollection rejection engaged a fronto-parietal network that has been posited to support retrieval monitoring processes. Critically, neural overlap between recollection rejection and true recollection was limited to one cluster in ventral visual cortex. Thus, there was little evidence that recollection rejection relies on a true recollection mechanism. Regarding aging, few behavioral studies have evaluated older adults' ability to use recollection rejection as a strategy for suppressing false memories, despite the wealth of research showing age-related increases in false memories. Further, no neuroimaging study has done so. In particular, given age deficits in true recollection processing, it is possible that difficulties engaging recollection represent a common cause of age-related deficits in true memories and age-related increases in false memories. However, while the present study revealed a behavioral age deficit that was specific to rejecting related lures using recollection rejection, very few neural differences between age groups were identified. While there was some evidence of age-related increases in neural activity associated with recollection rejection, there was far more neural activity that was common across age groups. Thus, when older adults make successful recollection rejection responses, they do so based on similar cognitive and neural processes as young adults
Using Gestalt principles of grouping to influence associative memory performance in young and older adults by John McCormick-Huhn( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The need to form and to remember associations is a critical part of everyday life. Unfortunately, the loss of this ability is one of the more severe and consequential memory impairments affecting older adults (Old & Naveh-Benjamin, 2008). Given the wide prevalence and impact of associative memory decline, a large body of literature has emerged documenting approaches aimed at ameliorating such deficits. One such approach has been unitization, the process of reintegrating separate pieces of information into a single unit (Tulving & Patterson, 1968). Unitization has been shown to transfer the retrieval of associative memory from a recollection-based process to a familiarity-based process (Diana et al., 2008). Processing items as a single unit (via unitization), can thus allow older adults to rely on intact familiarity and offset age deficits in recollection (see Yonelinas, 2002). To date, the vast majority of unitization studies have focused solely on higher-level semantic manipulations to unitize items (e.g., compound words). Given that much of our daily interactions occur in a visual world, I was motivated in my dissertation to evaluate if I could improve older adult associative memory performance using perceptual unitization. My approach to encouraging perceptual unitization was largely inspired by several Gestalt principles of grouping. Specifically, in the first two studies, I manipulated the connectedness of item-item associations via a horizontal connecting line. In the third study, I manipulated the connectedness of object pairs via contiguity and proximity. My findings across three studies suggest that the perceptual manipulation of stimuli at encoding does indeed influence associative memory performance in older adults. Specifically, I found that a simple manipulation, such as a connecting horizontal line, enhanced associative memory performance in older adults compared to object pairs that were not connected or were perceptually separated by a vertically positioned line. Additionally, I found enhanced memory performance when the exemplars of an object pair were touching as compared to the exemplars being spaced 8 inches apart. The findings contribute to scientific theories of the age-related associative memory deficit and unitization
The neural and behavioral correlates of related lure interference on correct recognition and false memory suppression by Shalome Sine( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Successful memory retrieval requires one to distinguish between old and new information. This is often difficult when new information is closely related to old information and thus causes interference at the time of the retrieval decision. In order to investigate the neural basis of these interference effects, we presented individuals with a retrieval test in which lures were perceptually similar to targets and counterbalanced the order in which the target and corresponding related lure were presented. Results showed that when the related lure came first (as opposed to when the related lure was preceded by the target), the lure caused interference in both recollection hit and recollection correct rejection trial types. Specifically, when the related lure was presented prior to the target, increased activity was observed in frontal and parietal regions (reflecting increased evaluation) as well as inferior and middle occipital gyri and fusiform gyrus (reflecting increased visual inspection necessary to resolve interference) for both items. When the target preceded the lure, results revealed a much more limited neural network for both target acceptance and lure rejection. These results suggest that the presentation of a related lure generates interference that then requires heightened attentional processing and evaluation of item details for both the current and future memory decisions. In contrast, when the target is presented first, and interference from the related lure is diminished, correct recognition and correct rejection processing operates much more efficiently
Tom Ferguson (1943-2006) by Nancy Dennis( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Hospitals and primary care by Nancy Dennis( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Edward Peterson (1905-2005) by Nancy Dennis( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

What's right with primary care? by Nancy Dennis( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Face emotion recognition : effect of emotional countenance on witness memory by William Crozier( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Knowing what is new : the effects of item-relatedness on the neural correlates of novelty detection by Caitlin R Bowman( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Languages
English (23)