WorldCat Identities

Galea, Liisa A. M.

Overview
Works: 9 works in 9 publications in 1 language and 7 library holdings
Roles: Other, Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Liisa A. M Galea
Sex-dependent effects of maternal corticosterone and SSRI treatment on hippocampal neurogenesis across development by Aarthi R Gobinath( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sex differences in route-learning by Liisa A. M Galea( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ovarian hormones, but not fluoxetine, impart resilience within a chronic unpredictable stress model in middle-aged female rats( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Depression is more prevalent in women than in men, and women are at a heightened risk for depression during the postpartum and perimenopause. There is also evidence to suggest that the ovarian hormone milieu may dictate antidepressant efficacy. Thus, it is important to investigate the role of ovarian hormones in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanisms that may underlie antidepressant efficacy. In the present study, we used 10-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats to examine the effects of long-term ovarian hormone deprivation on the development of depressive-like endophenotypes after chronic stress, and on antidepressant efficacy. Four months following ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery, all rats were subjected to 6 weeks of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). During the last 3 weeks of CUS, rats received daily injections of fluoxetine (5mg/kg) or vehicle. All rats were assessed on measures of anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) negative feedback inhibition, and on markers of neurogenesis and microglia in the dentate gyrus. Our findings demonstrate that long-term ovarian hormone deprivation increased anxiety and depressive-like behavior, as seen by increased immobility in the forced swim test and latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test, and decreased sucrose preference. Further, long-term OVX resulted in impaired HPA negative feedback inhibition, as seen in the dexamethasone suppression test. Fluoxetine treatment showed limited behavioral and neuroendocrine efficacy, however it reduced microglial (Iba-1) expression, and increased cell proliferation, neurogenesis (via cell survival), and the expression of the polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in the dentate gyrus, although these effects varied by region (dorsal, ventral) and ovarian status. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that ovarian hormones may impart resilience against the behavioral and neuroendocrine consequences of chronic unpredictable stress, and may modulate the effects of fluoxetine on cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and PSA-NCAM in the middle-aged female. Highlights: Long-term ovariectomy (OVX) increased depressive like-behavior in chronically stressed rats. Long-term OVX altered basal and stress corticosterone levels in chronically stressed rats. Fluoxetine increased neurogenesis and PSA-NCAM in the hippocampus in an ovarian status dependent manner. Fluoxetine reduced microglial number in the ventral hippocampus of chronically stressed rats
Parity modifies the effects of fluoxetine and corticosterone on behavior, stress reactivity, and hippocampal neurogenesis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The postpartum confers considerable risk for developing depression. Depressed patients have elevated cortisol concentrations and impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis negative feedback. Chronic stress or corticosterone (CORT) induces a depressive-like phenotype in rodents, including during the postpartum. The present study examined whether nulliparous and postpartum rats were differentially vulnerable to chronic high CORT and whether fluoxetine (FLX) would differentially alter the brain, behavior, and neuroendocrine function depending on reproductive experience. Nulliparous and postpartum female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups that received 21d of injections of CORT or oil plus FLX or saline. CORT reduced maternal behaviors whereas FLX reversed CORT-induced decreases in maternal care. CORT increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST), but FLX did not significantly alter immobility in either nulliparous or postpartum rats. Dams spent less time immobile and had lower CORT concentrations after the FST compared with nulliparae, indicating that aspects of the postpartum period may provide resilience against a depressive-like phenotype. Both CORT and parity reduced neurogenesis (doublecortin expression) in the dentate gyrus. FLX-treated rats had lower CORT concentrations following the FST and more immature neurons, but only in the nulliparous, and not postpartum, groups. These data suggest that the postpartum may inherently protect against some deleterious effects of high CORT but also confer resistance to the neurogenic and endocrine effects of FLX. Our findings are important for understanding how females in different reproductive states respond to glucocorticoids and antidepressants. Highlights: Parity, but not fluoxetine, reduced immobility in the forced swim test. Fluoxetine attenuated stress-induced corticosterone in nulliparae only. Fluoxetine reversed maternal care deficits with postpartum corticosterone. Fluoxetine increased neurogenesis in the ventral dentate in nulliparae only. Stress-induced increase in corticosterone was reduced in postpartum
Maternal postpartum corticosterone and fluoxetine differentially affect adult male and female offspring on anxiety-like behavior, stress reactivity, and hippocampal neurogenesis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Postpartum depression (PPD) affects approximately 15% of mothers, disrupts maternal care, and can represent a form of early life adversity for the developing offspring. Intriguingly, male and female offspring are differentially vulnerable to the effects of PPD. Antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, are commonly prescribed for treating PPD. However, fluoxetine can reach offspring via breast milk, raising serious concerns regarding the long-term consequences of infant exposure to fluoxetine. The goal of this study was to examine the long-term effects of maternal postpartum corticosterone (CORT, a model of postpartum stress/depression) and concurrent maternal postpartum fluoxetine on behavioral, endocrine, and neural measures in adult male and female offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley dams were treated daily with either CORT or oil and fluoxetine or saline from postnatal days 2-23, and offspring were weaned and left undisturbed until adulthood. Here we show that maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis negative feedback in adult male, but not female, offspring. Furthermore, maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased the density of immature neurons (doublecortin-expressing) in the hippocampus of adult male offspring but decreased the density of immature neurons in adult female offspring. Maternal postpartum CORT blunted HPA axis negative feedback in males and tended to increase density of immature neurons in males but decreased it in females. These results indicate that maternal postpartum CORT and fluoxetine can have long-lasting effects on anxiety-like behavior, HPA axis negative feedback, and adult hippocampal neurogenesis and that adult male and female offspring are differentially affected by these maternal manipulations. Highlights: Maternal postpartum fluoxetine increased anxiety-like behavior in adult males. Maternal postpartum fluoxetine impaired HPA axis negative feedback in adult males. Maternal postpartum fluoxetine raised neurogenesis in males but reduced in females. Maternal postpartum CORT increased neurogenesis in males but decreased in females. Maternal postpartum corticosterone blunted HPA axis activity in males and females
Maternal exercise increases but concurrent maternal fluoxetine prevents the increase in hippocampal neurogenesis of adult offspring( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: Maternal exercise increased dorsal hippocampal neurogenesis in adult offspring. Maternal postpartum fluoxetine reduced dorsal hippocampal neurogenesis in offspring. Maternal postpartum fluoxetine and exercise reduced HPA axis activity in males. Maternal exercise impaired HPA axis activity in female offspring. Abstract: Treating postpartum depression (PPD) with pharmacological antidepressants like fluoxetine (FLX) is complicated because these drugs can remain active in breast milk and potentially affect infant development. Alternatively, non-pharmacological treatments such as exercise are associated with beneficial effects on infant development but its potential ability to counter the effects of PPD are largely unknown. To investigate this, we treated dams with corticosterone (CORT) or vehicle (sesame oil) from postpartum days 2-25 to model PPD. Within oil and CORT treatments, dams were also assigned to one of these treatments: 1) exercise (voluntary running wheel)+FLX (10mg/kg, i.p.), 2) exercise+saline (vehicle for FLX), 3) no exercise+FLX, 4) no exercise+saline. Both male and female offspring were analyzed, and this generated a total of 16 experimental groups for this study. Adult male and female offspring (125d old) of these dams were tested for anxiety-like behavior in the novelty suppressed feeding test and stress reactivity in the dexamethasone suppression test. Hippocampal tissue was processed for doublecortin, a protein expressed in immature neurons. Regardless of sex, maternal exercise increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of adult offspring, but concurrent exposure to maternal fluoxetine prevented this effect. Exposure to either maternal exercise or maternal FLX facilitated HPA negative feedback in adult males but not females. Maternal postpartum CORT also facilitated HPA feedback in adult offspring of both sexes. Collectively, these data indicate that maternal exercise increased dorsal hippocampal neurogenesis in both sexes but differentially affected offspring HPA axis based on sex. Alternatively, maternal postpartum FLX facilitated HPA axis negative feedback only in males. These findings indicate that different types of maternal interventions bear long-term effects on offspring outcome with implications for treating PPD
Disinhibition of the prefrontal cortex leads to brain-wide increases in neuronal activation that are modified by spatial learning by Meagan L Auger( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Structural plasticity of the hippocampus in response to estrogens in female rodents by Paul A. S Sheppard( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sex differences in hippocampal cognition and neurogenesis by Shunya Yagi( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.92 (from 0.88 for Sex-depend ... to 1.00 for Sex-depend ...)

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