WorldCat Identities

Heckman, Bernadette

Overview
Works: 5 works in 5 publications in 1 language and 5 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Bernadette Heckman
A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Depression Intervention in Persons with Co-occurring Chronic Migraines by Ashley Joi Britton( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a strong co-occurring relationship between chronic headache disorders and psychiatric disorders ⁰́₃ particularly depression or anxiety. Epidemiological research has determined that headache disorders are the most prevalent neurological conditions, with significant psychosocial impacts on work, interpersonal well-being and recreational functioning. Prior headache research has repeatedly demonstrated that migraine is associated with significant negative impacts, including reduced quality of life, impaired functioning, and comorbid psychiatric disorders. Specifically, compared with migraine or a psychiatric condition alone, having migraine with co-occurring mental health disorders results in poorer health-related outcomes. Approximately 33 to 50% of chronic headache patients have mild to moderate depression; and traditional headache treatment was proven to be less effective in depressed patients. Antidepressants are well-documented for treatment of chronic daily headache disorders, including migraine and chronic tension headaches. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was developed in response to changing conceptualizations of both pain and psychological change mechanisms. The psychology of chronic pain is extensive and ranges from attention control and factors influencing performance of important social roles to aspects of identity construction. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a CBT intervention targeted to treat the depression in a community sample with co-occurring chronic headache disorders, with the goal of also improving the head pain severity and frequency. Relative to their counterparts in the Control Condition, individuals with frequent migraines and who also met diagnosis for a depressive disorder demonstrated significant reduction in depressive symptoms, headache days and headache-related disability immediately after undergoing a 4-session cognitive-behavioral intervention that targeted depression
Exploring perceptions of sexual assault in African American collegiate women with membership in Greek-letter sororities at a predominantly white institution by Ciera Victoria Scott( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sexual assault describes any form of sexual contact between individuals that occurred without clear, expressed consent by the trauma survivor (Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network, 2015). A national study reported that 27.7 of 1,000 college-aged women will be sexually assaulted (Fisher et al., 2000). Sorority membership is a risk factor for sexual assault in college-aged women due to high rates of alcohol consumption experienced at Greek social events (Minow & Einolf, 2009). Research disparities exist regarding sexual assault's impact on collegiate women of color with sorority membership (Barrick et al., 2012; Krebs et al., 2011; Henry, 2009). The purpose of this psychological study was to explore the perceptions that self-identified African American women with membership in Greek-letter sororities at a predominantly white institution (PWI) possessed regarding sexual assault. A qualitative methodology known as transcendental phenomenology, centered in Empowerment Feminist Therapy and Black Feminist Theory, served as the theoretical foundation of the researcher's exploration of the lived experiences of African American sorority women attending PWIs and their perceptions of sexual assault. The study participants included a total of 12 self-identified African American women with membership in Greek-letter sororities at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia. Results of this study included the identification of eight themes related to perceptions of sexual assault in African American sorority members attending PWIs. Participants' interviews provided insight about the sexual assault survivorship status of African American sorority members attending PWIs, demonstrated the impact of racialized and gendered stereotypes on participants' perceived risk for sexual assault, and revealed participants' beliefs about cultural norms for sexual expression and sexual behaviors across genders. In addition, the study participants expressed the multi-faceted manner in which their Greek membership served as both a protective and a risk factor for their potential sexual victimization at a PWI
Personality and mindfulness practice : does personality predict engagement in mindfulness? by Jason Randelle Blizzard( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this study is to investigate the interface between mindfulness and personality, specifically how personality traits affect the frequency with which a person engages in mindfulness practice. The hypotheses of this study predicted that the Big Five personality traits of Extraversion, Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Openness to Experience would be positively correlated with engagement in the practice of mindfulness, while Neuroticism would be negatively correlated. The methodology consisted of online psychological measures, two in-person group training sessions in mindfulness, and four weeks of researcher observation to determine the frequency with which participants practiced mindfulness. The data was analyzed using a bivariate correlational analysis and a linear regression analysis, with outcome measures being number of days meditated, trait mindfulness, and mindfulness self-efficacy. The correlational analyses yielded no significant findings with regard to Days Meditated (Extraversion, r = .118, p = .238; Agreeableness, r = .012, p = .906; Conscientiousness, r = .092, p = .357; Neuroticism, r = -.035, p = .725; Openness, r = -.061, p = .541); trait mindfulness as measured by the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) (Extraversion, r = .158, p = .175; Agreeableness, r = .167, p = .152; Conscientiousness, r = .103, p = .380; Neuroticism, r = -.153, p = .115; Openness, r = .064, p = .584); or mindfulness self-efficacy as measured by the Mindfulness Self-Efficacy scale (Extraversion, r = -.055, p = .618; Agreeableness, r = -.034, p = .760; Conscientiousness, r = -.077, p = .490; Neuroticism, r = .055, p = .621; Openness, r = .011, p = .921). An additional correlational analysis between Neuroticism and the MAAS found no significant relationship (r = -.153, p = .189). Lastly, the regression analyses did not reveal a predictive relationship between any personality variables and any of the outcome measures (Days Meditated, MAAS, MSE), despite two of the overall models yielding significant results (MAAS: R2 = .55, F(18,69) = 4.65, p <.01; MSE: R2 = .34, F(10,77) = 4.01, p <.01)
Impostor phenomenon, minority status stress and racial microaggressions on the mental and physical health of ethnic minority college students by Asale Afiya Hubbard( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The impact of minority status stress, impostor phenomenon and racial micro-aggressions on the mental and physical health of ethnic minority college students was examined in the current study. Participants included: African American, Latino/a, Asian, Biracial, Multiracial and White students undergraduate students attending a large predominantly White university in the southeast. Results showed that minority status stress and impostor feelings are significantly related to mental health while racial micro-aggressions are significantly related to physical health and GPA. Impostor feelings were a significant predictor of mental health and racial micro-aggressions were a significant predictor for physical health. African American students were significantly less satisfied with their campus climate and Asian students reported significantly more impostor feelings. The culture of predominantly White universities has a unique impact on the experience and perceptions of ethnic minority students. Implications for working with ethnic minority students regarding mental and physical health concerns on predominantly White campuses are offered
Asian indians living in North America with chronic pain by Neha Khorana( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study expands upon research on the help-seeking behaviors of ethnic minorities, specifically Asian Indians living with low to moderate chronic pain in the United States and Canada. We examined the effect of acculturation, loss of face, and pain characteristics (e.g. pain severity and pain interference) on the attitudes toward seeking health services and the actual utilization of pain management services. Participants included 94 Asian Indians living in the United States or Canada who experience low to moderate chronic pain. Results showed that acculturation is significantly related to attitudes toward seeking health services and loss of face is not associated with either attitudes toward or utilization of pain management services. Pain characteristics (e.g. pain severity and pain interference) were not significantly associated with attitudes toward seeking health care services, but were significantly related to utilization of services. These findings demonstrated that Asian Indians experience unique cultural challenges related to accessing health services for their chronic pain, but that pain characteristics are the most important variable in actual utilization of pain management services
 
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