WorldCat Identities

Hyland, P. (Paul)

Overview
Works: 77 works in 78 publications in 1 language and 78 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by P Hyland
Sources of innovation and ideas in ICT firms in Australia by P Hyland( )

2 editions published between 2004 and 2006 in Undetermined and English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines a sample of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) firms in Australia drawn from a wide range of product and service providers in the Sydney region. It researches the sources of information and ideas that firms utilize to sustain their competitive position through innovation. While the firms in the survey varied in size in terms of turnover, number of employees and level of business activity, most see themselves as innovative. Not all firms utilized the same sources of innovation-related knowledge and most used research and technology organizations (RTOs) or other publicly funded sources of information for help with technical (standards etc) or trade issues. While ICT firms are often regarded as leadingedge developers of new ideas, this research indicated that ICT firms still see their sales force, customers and suppliers as the most important sources of innovation knowledge and ideas
Regional employment trends : the challenge for strategic employment relations by Bruce Acutt( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Regional Australia has been exposed to the forces of globalisation and the impact on employment has been significant. In capital cities and larger metropolitan centres fluctuations and churn in the labour market may not lead to major shortages or downturns and often these fluctuations in employment trends are short-lived. In rural and regional areas, fluctuations can cause major disruptions and shortages can be long term as it is becoming increasingly difficult to attract and retain skilled workers to relatively isolated communities. The resulting change has forced a process of re-creation on business and this has impacted upon regional labour markets. It has been argued (Hyland, Mellor, & Stewart, 2002) that because of industrial relations reform driven by successive Federal governments, Australian workplaces have higher levels of flexibility in labour regulations and practices relative to other industrialised regions such as Europe and North America. This flexibility has resulted in changes to labour markets and in many cases skills shortages. This paper examines the labour market trends and skills shortages identified in a survey of regional and rural organisations in Queensland and the Northern Territory. An analysis of employment trends by organisational type is presented that examines three organisational categories and compares and contrasts recent employment trends for full time, part time, casual and contract workers. This analysis also compares trends between large and small enterprises and presents some findings on labour market shortages particularly in the professions, managerial positions and trades
Innovation in the beef supply chain : the importance of customers and suppliers to innovation by Maree Storer( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Supply chain innovation requires that actors in supply chains invest in inter-firm relationships. To build innovation capacity between firms requires a number of competences and actors need to build trust and share information if they are to learn from one another and develop the behaviours needed to innovate. The Australian beef supply chain is a globally competitive supply chain that has invested significantly in innovation at the business level, particularly in breeding animals to survive in extreme conditions in Australia and produce a high quality carcass beef. This paper examines the relationships between firms in the supply chain and analyses the nature of relational factors between firms. Initial findings indicate that the supply chain is poorly integrated and many of the actors are badly placed to develop innovative capacity with supply chain partners
Differences in knowledge processing : why operations researchers do not understand manufacturing managers by Roger Jenkins( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Manufacturing Management and Operations Research should be complementary disciplines. This work examines the importance of learning and knowledge capture to both groups as they seek to understand the manufacturing environment. The work discussed in this research is empirical, systematic, and compares a group of OR professionals to a group of manufacturing managers. A particular technology was selected to provide a focus for the detailed analysis: and this technology was discrete event simulation, and the managers involved ·in the research, were based in Australian companies. This paper develops an empirically based analysis of one aspect of manufacturing management of interest to both groups. From the data it is clear that manufacturing managers and operations researchers have different approaches to the collection, storage and codification of knowledge, and the infonnation subjected to this process is different. These findings indicate that these two groups have significant difficulty in communicating concepts such as knowledge management because oftheir clearly divergent mindsets
The role of relational capabilities in developing the capacity for supply chain innovation by Mario Ferrer( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the types of relational capabilities supply chain participants develop to enable ongoing supply chain innovation capacity building that produces improved business outcomes. This is exploratory research using qualitative data gathered by using five interviews, with the Australian road freight industry as the context. Two key relational capabilities and the improvement of four key business outcomes were identified as being present in the interaction of freight transport service providers with members of their supply chain. The data also demonstrates that by entering into competence building relationships with customers and suppliers firms can build capabilities that will increase their capacity for supply chain innovation. Even in short term arms length relationships firms can acquire improved skills behaviours and practices that enhance their operation effectiveness and the efficiency of the supply chain relationships
Factors that influence information systems decisions and outcomes : a summary of key themes from four case studies by Kieren Jamieson( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper reports a summary of key findings from an examination of Information Systems decision making in four organizations. The study focused on what factors influenced decision makers during the critical preimplementation phase of Information System projects when systems were evaluated, selected and acquired
Modelling the role of human resource management in Continuous Innovation by Frances Jørgensen( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Although it is widely acknowledged that both Human Resourse Management (HRM) and Continuous Improvement have the potential to positively influencing organizational performance, very little attention has been given to how certain HRM practices may support CI, and consequently, a company's performance. The objective of this paper is to take a first step in developing a theoretical model for the role of HRM in CI, based on the current literature from both fields. In particular, elements from the CI maturity Model (Bassant and Caffyn, 1997) and a model depicting the role of HRM in innovation developed by de Leede and Looise (2005) serve as the framework for examining how specific bundles of HRM practices utilzed during different phases of the CI implementaion process may contribute to sustained organizational performance and enhanced operational performance. The primary contribution of the paper is theoretical in nature, as the model developed provides a greater understanding of how HRM can contribute to CI; however, the model also has practical value in that it suggests important relationships between various HRM practices and the behaviors necessary for successful CI. The paper concludes with a number of possible research avenues derived from the presented model
Explanatory power of factors influencing inter-firm relationships in the Australian road freight industry by Mario Ferrer( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Organisations are increasingly looking beyond their organisational boundaries to evaluate how resources can be utilised to survive and grow the business. Different inter-organisational relationships have emerged as important resources in supply chains. There is a need for firms to successfully manage a range of relationships and to understand the capabilities they need to benefit from relationships. There has been little empirical work done that has enabled organisations to predict what type of relationship they are ready to enter into, this research reports some early findings from an Australian study. The road transport sector is critical to all supply chains. This paper reports on a survey of road transport operators in Australia engaged in inter-firm relationships and examines the factors that influence the formation and nature of relationships. Initial findings indicate that, in less mature inter-firm relationships, the dominant type of relational factors are sharing and interdependency. It is also demonstrated that the importance that freight managers place on power does not encourage engagement in cooperative relationships
Representing enterprise innovation : a system engineering view by Ronald C Beckett( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Many conflicting views and models of innovation have emerged in the literature, yet managers are expected to manage imovation in a systematic way. In discussing creativity, it has been suggested that it fonns something from nothing; then innovation shapes that something into products and services. The concept of innovation is understood by many as organised activities that produce outcomes that change market characteristics Some finns have had success in co-coordinating tacit and explicit elements of enterprise practices using a systems approach to provide some holistic order in a complex set of practices This paper examines various models ofinnovation and puts forward a systems approach
Driving innovation : a systemic approach by Ronald C Beckett( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There is currently an enthusiasm for supporting innovation in Australia, both within the management of enterprises and within all levels of Government. One view of a national system of innovation sees the individual enterprise at the core (sometimes called "the innovation dynamo" in this view) supported by science and technology infrastructure with a variety of technology transfer activities linking the two. Some innovation researchers see innovation as a people driven process. We see that certain core competencies are required. Others see innovation as a technologoy driven process. We see that access to particular complementary assets is required. Yet others highlight the mismatch in organisation norms between innovation (divergent thinking and disruptive change) and efficiency (convergent thinking and predictable outcomes) with Multiple internal and external factors shape the innovative capacity and practices of enterprises. Our interest is in the workings of innovation within an individual enterprise and we have used a systems engineering modeling approach to both represent these workings and to assess the effectiveness of enterprise innovation. The model developed can be applied equally well to both technological and non-technological innovation, and helps understand the interaction a variety of factors that may support or inhibit innovation. Its application to a case example is presented, along with observations from other cases
Managerial competencies and organizational capabilities in striving for continuous innovation by P Hyland( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Organisations are being told they need to improve their dynamic capabilities and increase their capacity to grow in an increasingly dynamic environment. Knowledge-based industries are increasingly competing on the basis of their knowledge resources. R & D and new product development activities are dependent on knowledge-based resources. This paper draws together work on learning behaviours, capabilities and capacities and shows how these can be linked to a competitive position for knowledge-based activities. Using empirical data collected for a European-Australian study on continuous innovation in new product development, this research demonstrates how bundles of learning behaviours create organisational capabilities
HRD strategies making a difference in regional Australia : implications for local action in a global context by P Hyland( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Effective Human Resource Development (HRD) has long been recognised as a critical element in overall organisational strategy, and in turn is important to the ongoing sustainability of organisations. In this paper, the importance of effective HRD strategies and interventions are considered, particularly in the context of a rapidly changing environment, requiring those within the organisation to change past behaviours and accumulate new knowledge at an ever-growing rate; more recently referred to a unlearning. Based on research undertaken in organisations located in regional Queensland and the Northern Territory, Australia, it is argued that effective HRD strategies are just as important in these locations as anywhere else. The level of consideration given to unlearning as a component of broader HRD initiatives, along with the systems utilised to reinforce learning in these organisations is analysed. The results of the survey provide some initial perceptions of the importance of unlearning, as well as an indication of the mechanisms being utilised to reinforce unlearning and ensure that new learning is embedded
Performance measurement and new product development : is it linked to manufacturing strategy? by P Hyland( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There has been an increasing emphasis on measuring the performance of manufacturing operations using measures other than profit and productivity. The literature argues that operations need to measure quality, reliability, flexibility and customer satisfaction but this may not be the case. One area of performance measurement that is often neglected or put in the too hard basket is new product development (NPD). As firms attempted to capture new markets and customers NPD is becoming increasingly important and the link between NPD, marketing and manufacturing should be of strategic importance. There is evidence that suggest manufacturing is often driven by marketing but in turn manufacturing can do little to influence marketing. This paper examines some of the performance measures widely used in manufacturing and seeks to examine some of the links between NPD performance measurement and manufacturing strategy. The paper describes an analysis of results of a global manufacturing survey
Mentoring for growth in regional areas : a case study of the Rockhampton VCCU by Jessica Kennedy( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the late 1990s, the Queensland Government believed that existing market mechanisms were failing to fund and support many SME's and ideas that would grow business and the Queensland economy, which meant that Queensland entrepreneurs were not achieving their full potential. To overcome this market failure it was recognised that a central government agency was needed with a process enabling start-up business to access the range of skills, resources and networks required to grow from an idea to a fully operational business. The Queensland Department of State Development and Innovation (DSDI) established a Venture Capital Unit (VCU), now the Venture Capital and Commercialisation Unit (VCCU), dedicated to helping more start-ups get off the ground and survive their first tenuous years of business
An approach to characterising organisation culture with an example linked to innovation by Ronald C Beckett( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The expression "organisation culture", perceived as behavioural norms and (frequently unspoken) rules related to knowledge sharing and decision-making, appears as a significant influence factor in a number of aspects of management research. The authors have been conducting parallel research studies in the fields of inter-organisational collaboration and innovation for some time, and have noted references to "a culture of collaboration" and the need for an "innovative culture" in these fields. Our objective is to assist individual firms in achieving beneficial outcomes from active collaboration and from embracing innovation, and as part ofthat process we have been addressing issues of organisation culture. Some people are comfortable with the term "culture" at the conceptual level, but others want some more specific form of characterisation that helps define areas for improvement and has clear linkages to enterprise imperatives. This paper presents an approach used in such a characterisation, and discusses its application to a culture ofinnovation
Technology talking : an empirical study of young people's use of telecommunications by P Hyland( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper discusses exploratory research examining the usage of mobile phones by the young people and identifies the differences in usage patterns, specifically SMS and voice, based on age group and gender. The youth market is worthy of research due to its increasing size and value. This research demonstrates that the youth market is not a single segment and that there are significant differences in usage, preferences and purchasing decisions
Examining management capabilities for innovation : creating the capacity to let go by Dennis Mussig( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The capacity to cope with radical uncertainty is critical to any business in securing competitive advantage. Since the middle of the twentieth century differing learning methods have been used to change employee behaviours and increase skills and competencies. Learning is critical to developing innovation capabilities but innovation management continues to be a strategic challenge for business, and many companies lack the prerequisite managerial competencies required for innovation. Supporting high levels of involvement by all operational stakeholders through continuous learning initiatives increases the need to develop new managerial competencies and organisational capabilities and behaviours that support the innovation process. This new innovation climate requires a shift from a facilitative or control role, to one where the manager, just like a coach, has to let the team do their thing when required. Managers have to develop the capacity to trust and let go. Using data collected from a sample of Australian manufacturing firms surveyed in 2003, this paper reports on certain findings in relation to management practices as part of continuous improvement and learning activities. Managers in the sample identified the increased need for management to play an effective role in improvement and learning activities. However when cross tabulated with an 'Innovation Maturity Index' only a small number of organisations were ranked in the 'High Maturity' category which contemporary literate suggest requires 'low' management involvement. The results also identify a low level of employees taking up opportunities for learning or personal development. Inadequate management competencies are discussed as a possible cause of the gap between the desired and the current position which has the potential to reduce not increase organisational learning capabilities and competitive advantage
Strategies for maintaining customer satisfaction in logistics : cases from distribution centres by Claudine Soosay( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Organisations in supply chains face challenges in achieving competitive advantage. Through new knowledge and strategies, there is increased creation and development of not only new products and services, but also sophisticated production and distribution processes. With the growing affluence of customers and rising standards of living, it is imperative for any organisation to find ways and strategies to continuously attain high levels of customer satisfaction [28]. This may entail developing a cluster of capabilities that enables the company and its supply chain partners to customise its products and services to meet individual customer needs [21] [35] [17]. The objective of this paper is to investigate the strategies developed to enhance customer satisfaction in Distribution Centres as an organisational capability. This is based on a study of continuous innovation in the supply chain. The empirical research involved detailed exploratory case studies of ten Distribution Centres, primarily employing qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-three managers in these ten organisations and visits to observe the operations of Distribution Centres. The case studies showed firms commitment to customer satisfaction through various ways such as being flexible, anticipating demand, collecting information and identifying new and different ways to satisfying customers. This study provides insight into firm-based activities and strategies required to pursue capability development in logistics firms and provide useful recommendations for managers who are seeking to build innovative service organisations
System effectiveness and operational effectiveness : can an optimal balance be obtained? by Ricardo Santa( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Organisations are increasingly investing significant resources, time and money, in complex information systems. In most cases there are important claims made concerning how these expensive systems will produce considerable improvements in the operational performance of the organisations. However there is evidence that shows many of these systems fail to deliver and often fail completely. This paper attempts to provide linkages between system effectiveness and operational performance that will enable managers to better understand the interaction between information systems and operational performance. Drawing on literature on both information systems and operational effectiveness this paper puts forward a model for further empirical investigation
A case study on knowledge transfer as an integrative approach to competitive advantage by Claudine Soosay( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Knowledge has been recognised as a source of competitive advantage. Knowledge-based resources allow organisations to succeed by providing the ability to adapt products and services to the marketplace and deal with competitive challenges. One critical factor is the ability to transfer knowledge as a dimension of the learning organisation. There are many elements that may influence whether knowledge transfer can be effectively achieved in an Organisation such as leadership, problem-solving behaviours, support structures, change management, absorptive capacity and types of knowledge. Based on a framework suggested by Goh (2002), an exploratory case study was conducted to explain how knowledge transfer can be management effectively and to identify emerging issues or additional factors necessary in the process. As a result, a refined model is proposed for a better understanding and effective management of knowledge transfer process that could enable competitive advantage
 
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