WorldCat Identities

Jovicic, Ana

Overview
Works: 5 works in 5 publications in 1 language and 6 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ana Jovicic
Unique Cell-Type-Specific Distributions and Functions of Brain MicroRNAs( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Facilitators and barriers for recruiting and engaging hard-to-reach older people to health promotion interventions and related research: a systematic review( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Older people from particular groups engage less in health promotion interventions and related research, potentially generating inequities. This review aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to participation in health promotion interventions or health promotion-related research in groups of older people known to participate less. Methods: We focused on older people from black and minority ethnic groups, older people in deprived areas, and those aged 85 years and older (oldest-old). We searched Medline, Cochrane Library, SCOPUS, Embase, PsychINFO, SSCI, CINAHL, and SCIE databases (Jan 1, 1990, to Dec 31, 2014) to identify eligible studies reporting facilitators and barriers of recruiting or engaging any of the three groups in health interventions or health promotion-related research (see appendix for search terms). Eligible study designs included surveys, qualitative interviews and focus groups, and mixed methods. Recruitment and engagement strategies reported were identified and analysed thematically for each group. Themes were identified by two researchers independently and agreed with the team. Findings: 34 studies (three with oldest-old, 24 with black and minority ethnic groups, five within deprived areas, one with both oldest-old and black and minority ethnic groups, one with both oldest-old and deprived areas) were included. Half of studies reported mainly on recruitment; half on engagement. 16 studies focused on participation in interventions; 18 studies were on participation in related research. Facilitators for recruiting in deprived areas included targeting social aspects of participation and providing a personalised approach. Similarly, building trust was important for recruitment from black and minority ethnic groups and oldest-old. Facilitators for engaging black and minority ethnic groups included involving community leaders and recruitment during existing activities; for the oldest-old gaining family support was important. Facilitators across all groups included use of incentives and well-targeted advertising. Barriers among black and minority ethnic groups included fear of falling, poor knowledge of benefits, lack of self-confidence, family responsibilities, and cultural barriers (language, mixed-sex sessions, religious practices). Barriers among the oldest-old included tiredness and feeling too old for preventive health care. Negative social interaction with research staff was a barrier identified in deprived areas only. Barriers across all groups were lack of motivation, deteriorating health, costs, and lack of transportation. Interpretation: This review has identified numerous facilitators and barriers for recruiting and engaging hard-to-reach older people in health promotion interventions and related research; these include specific facilitators and barriers for particular groups, which should be considered in practice. Funding: This study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). AL is funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research
General Practitioners' views and experiences of loneliness in their older adult patients by Ana Jovicic( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Nuclear transport dysfunction: a common theme in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative diseases with overlapping genetic factors and pathology. On the cellular level, a majority of ALS and FTD cases are characterized by nuclear clearance and cytoplasmic aggregation of otherwise nuclear proteins, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), or fused in sarcoma. Recent studies investigating cellular pathways perturbed by genetic risk factors for ALS/FTD converge on nucleocytoplasmic transport dysfunction as a mechanism leading to disease pathophysiology. We propose that mutations in FUS and hexanucleotide expansions in C9orf72 and aging all converge on the impairment of nucleocytoplasmic transport, which results in the hallmark pathological feature of ALS/FTD - cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 or FUS. Abstract : We propose that mutations in FUS and hexanucleotide expansions in C9orf72 and aging all converge on the impairment of nucleocytoplasmic transport, which results in the hallmark pathological feature of ALS/FTD - cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 or FUS
Engaging hard-to-reach groups in health promotion: the views of older people and professionals from a qualitative study in England( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Older people living in deprived areas, from black and minority ethnic groups, and aged over 85 years are often considered hard-to-reach. This qualitative study aimed to explore their views on health promotion services, with a view to help inform best practice on engagement. Methods: Older people were recruited through primary care and community-based groups. 19 participated in an interview (n=15) or focus group (n=4); including some overlaps, 16 were from a deprived area, 12 were in black and ethnic minority groups, and 5 were aged 85 years or older. Cross-sector professionals across England with experience of working with one or more of the groups were identified with online searches and snowball sampling. 31 of 44 professionals completed an online survey. Thematic analysis was used to develop a framework of higher and lower level themes. Interpretations were discussed and agreed within the team. Findings: Older people from all hard-to-reach groups described some health-promoting activities they practised themselves, including lifelong lifestyle approaches, with a focus on maintaining independence. All groups reported cost and access considerations as barriers to participation in health promotion. Among older people in deprived areas, facilitators included monetary incentives and interventions held locally or accessible through free transport. Barriers included reluctance to seek medical help, mistrust of professionals, and negative social relationships with other participants. Professionals' successful strategies targeting this group included personalised health education focusing on their interests and engaging local services, community, peers, and family. Older people from black and ethnic minority groups reported that social opportunities and peer support facilitated engagement. Barriers focused on cultural and language differences. These barriers were also reported by professionals who reported culture-specific, tailored information alongside good relationships with community groups and families as important. For the oldest-old, home visits were popular. Poor health and lack of interest in health promotion were major barriers. Face-to-face contact and involving individuals from an early stage were reported as successful strategies by professionals. Interpretation: This is one of few studies conducted in England investigating views of both hard-to-reach older people and professionals working with them. Study limitations include selection bias because only those interested responded. Specific facilitators and barriers identified by older people and professionals may shape best practice on increasing engagement with health promotion services for hard-to-reach groups. Funding: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). AL is funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research
 
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