WorldCat Identities

Kvapil, Rachael

Overview
Works: 6 works in 6 publications in 1 language and 42 library holdings
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Rachael Kvapil
Survivor Kasatochi : insects after the volcanic eruption by Derek S Sikes( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kasatochi volcano, a small island in the Aleutians, erupted violently in August of 2008 burying the island in ash and presumably destroying all surrounding life. Derek Sikes, curator of Insects at the University of Alaska Museum, in collaboration with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service visited the island two months before the eruption and each of two years after the eruption. Despite the survival of some plants, the arthropod-based ecosystem was not subsisting on vegetation. In this lecture Sikes will describe the insect community before and after the eruption
Healthy Alaska : what's in our fish? by Todd O'Hara( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fish are they primary foods for many animals in Alaska, including humans. Their chemical composition is diverse and is important in understanding nutrients, contaminants, and in addressing pathways of exposure (diet) to these important components. Dr. O'Hara's lecture will review his research that addresses "piscivory" (fish consumption), the well-known health benefits, and some of the complications associated with assessing contaminants. The research that will be presented includes many fish-consuming species across Alaska
Auroras at solar minimum by Roger Smith( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Auroral activity is related to solar activity. Every eleven years the sun goes through a period of minimum activity, which is normally about a year in length. We do not see the aurora so much in years of solar minimum. The most recent solar minimum has lingered for three years without a decided turn towards the next maximum. This lecture will discuss the sluggish solar minimum we are currently experiencing and explain the resulting effects on the aurora
Thawing permafrost : what does it mean for the Arctic? by Vladimir Romanovsky( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The observed and predicted future climatic changes will inevitably change land surface in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic. This will trigger changes in ecosystems and infrastructure that will be most notable in the permafrost areas. In losing permafrost, plant-life and human-made structures lose their stability. Analysis of the long-term records of the near-surface permafrost temperature, obtained from different parts of the permafrost zone, shows a significant warming trend during the last 30 to 40 years. Within some areas the permafrost temperatures now are very close to 0°C and at some sites a long-term permafrost thaw has already started. If recent trends continue, it will take several centuries to millennia for permafrost in the present discontinuous zone to disappear completely. However, negative consequences of this degradation will be noticeable from the very beginning because the highest ice content in permafrost usually is found closer to the ground surface. This lecture will discuss possible effects of degrading permafrost on hydrology, ecosystems, infrastructure in local communities, and on carbon cycle
Lessons learned from the Gulf oil spill by Fran Ulmer( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On May 21, 2010, President Barack Obama established the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling through Executive Order 13543. The Commission was charged with examining the relevant facts and circumstances concerning the root causes of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and developing options to guard against, and mitigate the impact of, any oil spills associated with offshore drilling in the future. This includes recommending improvements to federal laws, regulations, and industry practices. As one of the seven Commissioners appointed by President Obama, University of Alaska Anchorage Chancellor Fran Ulmer toured Louisiana and heard testimony from those involved in the oil spill. She and the other Commissioners visited response and control centers in Louisiana, Alabama and Florida; met with local government and business leaders; talked with spill clean-up workers and listened to those impacted by the spill and involved in the clean-up and response. In this lecture, Chancellor Ulmer will discuss the Commission findings
Whale tales : a thirty-year perspective on humpback whales in Alaska waters by Janice M Straley( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Humpback whales are well-adapted to move through the ocean. Their bodies are streamlined with only a few bristles for hair on top of the head and no external ear flaps. Each whale has a nasal opening on the top of its head that allows it to exhale efficiently and inhale without lifting its head out of the water. Their powerful flukes, a modified 15-foot wide tail, propel them through the water. Humpbacks have the longest flippers (pectoral fins) of any whale, and the leading edge of the fin has ridges that increase their hydrodynamic efficiency. In this lecture, Professor Jan Straley will discuss her thirty years of research to understand the complexities of the lives of humpback whales. She will present the latest findings from a study spanning across the North Pacific, discuss her Alaska-based research and provide insight why some whales linger in colder waters during the fall and winter, when most whales, and sensible Alaskans, are migrating to the warmer climates of Mexico and Hawaii
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.48 (from 0.48 for Thawing pe ... to 0.48 for Thawing pe ...)

Languages