WorldCat Identities

Lane, Edgar Carey

Overview
Works: 71 works in 71 publications in 1 language and 1,947 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  Oral histories  Internet videos 
Classifications: E185.97, 973.04960730092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Edgar Carey Lane
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Samuel Yette( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Author, journalist and publisher Samuel F. Yette was born on July 2, 1929 in Harriman, Tennessee. After high school, he briefly attended Morristown College and Tennessee State University, before joining the Air Force in 1951. Teaching in Chattanooga, he completed his B.S. degree from Indiana University. In 1956, Yette teamed with Gordon Parks as special correspondent for LIFE magazine. Yette reported for the Afro-American Newspapers, and integrated the Dayton Journal Herald. As associate editor of Ebony and director of information for Tuskegee University, Yette’s reputation grew. In 1963, he was selected executive secretary of the Peace Corps, then special assistant for civil rights to the director of the U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity. Yette became the first black Washington correspondent for Newsweek in 1968. Authoring The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival In America in 1971, Yette garnered numerous awards. He later founded Cottage Books, a publishing company. He passed away on January 21, 2011
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Allie B. Latimer( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lawyer and social activist Allie Latimer was born in 1929 in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania and raised in Alabama. She graduated from Alabama State Lab High School and earned her B.S. degree from Hampton Institute. In 1953, she received her J.D. degree from Howard University Law School. She received a LL.M degree from Catholic University and degrees from Howard University School of Divinity. In 1968, Latimer organized and founded Federally Employed Women (FEW). She joined the General Services Administration (GSA) in the early 1970s as an assistant general counsel. In 1976, she left to serve as assistant general counsel for NASA. In 1977, she returned to GSA and became the first woman and African American to serve as general counsel of a major federal agency. From 1987 to 1995, she served as special counsel for ethics and civil rights at GSA. In 2009, she was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Sister Patricia Ralph( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Educator and nun Patricia Anne Ralph was born on August 15, 2004 in Jersey City, New Jersey, known as “Sister Patty” to her friends and the hundreds of students she’s taught. In 1979, she earned her high school diploma from Benedictine Academy, a private Catholic school in Elizabeth, New Jersey where she was a cheerleader, baton twirler and a member of the dance team. In 1985, Ralph graduated from Jersey City State College where she earned her degree in teaching. This same year she entered the Community of St. Joseph to begin her journey as a nun. The only African American nun in the St. Joseph community of 1,200, she taught on the elementary level at schools in Philadelphia, Newark, Maryland and Washington, D.C. In 2002, she was named principal of Holy Name Catholic School in Washington, D.C. Ralph’s twin sister was also a nun teaching in Memphis, Tennessee
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Betty Currie( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Federal government employee Betty Grace Williams Currie was born on November 10, 1939, in Edwards, Mississippi and grew up in Waukegan, Illinois. She graduated from Waukegan Township High School’s in 1957 and, later, attended Howard University, American University and Antioch College. Currie began her career as a clerical worker at the U. S. Naval Training Station at Great Lakes, Illinois. Moving to Washington, D.C., she worked for the U. S. Navy and several government agencies before retiring in 1984. Currie volunteered for the presidential campaigns of Mondale/Ferraro in 1984, and Dukakis/Bentsen in 1988. In 1991, she joined the Clinton/Gore campaign in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1991. President-elect Bill Clinton appointed Currie as his personal secretary in the White House. In 1997, Currie testified before the special prosecutor’s investigation of the Clinton/Lewinsky affair. From 2008, she served on the Alcohol Beverage Board of St. Mary’s County, Maryland
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Wilhelmina Rolark( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chief executive Wilhelmina Rolark was born on September 27, 1916 in Portsmouth, Virginia. In 1933, she graduated from high school. She attended Howard University from 1933-1937 earning a B.S. degree and M.A. degree in political science. In 1944, she earned her J.D. degree from the Robert H. Terrell Law School in Washington, D.C. In 1969, Rolark and her husband, the late Dr. Calvin Rolark, founded the United Black Fund, a non-profit organization that provides funding to community-based organizations. In 1970, she founded the National Association of Black Women Attorneys. In 1976, she was elected to Washington, D.C. city council, where she went on to serve four consecutive terms. In 1994, she was unanimously elected as the President /CEO, United Black Fund, a position she held for twelve years. Rolark also served on the National Board of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Rolark passed away on February 14, 2006, at the age of 89
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Marie Johns( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Corporate executive Marie Johns was born on August 19, 1951 in Indianapolis, Indiana. She attended Indiana University, completing her B.S. and M.S. degrees in public administration in 1981, in addition to management studies courses at Harvard University and the University of Virginia. Johns served as president of Verizon, Washington, D.C., responsible for multi-million dollar operation. She succeeded in bringing committed members of nonprofit entities and government to form the Washington, D.C. Technology Council in efforts to strengthen education, health care and economic development systems in the District of Columbia. Johns served as a trustee of Howard University. She was on boards for the D.C. Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Club of Washington, and others. The Network Journal named Johns one of the 25 Most Influential Black Women in Business in April 2003. She also served as deputy administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA)
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Sterling Tucker( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

City administrator, consultant, and nonprofit executive Sterling Tucker was born in Akron, Ohio on December 21, 1923. After high school, he enrolled in the University of Akron, earning his A.B. degree in 1946 and his M.A. degree in 1950. Moving to Washington, DC in 1956, Tucker became the head of the Washington chapter of the National Urban League. Remaining in that position until 1974, when he was elected to Washington’s City Council in the first election after the establishment of Home Rule. In 1978, Tucker ran for the office of mayor, but lost to Marion Barry. Following his defeat in the mayoral campaign, Tucker was named assistant secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, remaining until 1981. That year, he opened Sterling Tucker Associates, a consulting firm. From 1988 to 1990, he served as Washington, DC’s drug czar, working to develop strategies for combating drug usage
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Ruth A. Davis( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Government employee Ruth A. Davis was born on May 28, 1943, in Phoenix, Arizona. After graduating from Booker T. Washington High School in Atlanta, she attended Spelman College where she earned her B.A. degree in sociology, graduating in 1966. While attending Spelman, she spent fifteen months studying and traveling in Europe and the Middle East as a Merrill Scholar. She earned her M.A. degree in social work at the University of California at Berkeley. Davis is the first African American female career ambassador. Since joining the Foreign Service in 1969, she has served in a variety of posts, reaching the height of her career in 1992 when she was appointed Ambassador to the Republic of Benin. She has also served in Zaire, Kenya, Tokyo and Italy. As director general of the Foreign Service and director of human resources from 2001 to 2003, she developed the “School of Leadership and Management.”
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Ronald Gilbert Baker( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Photographer Ronald Gilbert Baker was born on June 4, 1949 in Washington, D.C. Baker received his high school diploma from Anacostia High School in 1967, and then worked as a clerk in the Public Affairs office of the Navy Department until 1971. From 1971 to 1973, Baker served in the U.S. Army as a guard stationed at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He enrolled at Federal City College in 1976, majoring in cinematography, photography and mass media. That year, he was hired to photograph Van McCoy and Muhammad Ali. From 1976 to 1994, Baker worked at C&P Telephone Company while still pursuing his photography career. In 1979, Baker published his first book, Solid Images. His portfolio includes photographs of Michael Jackson, Oprah Winfrey, Bill Clinton, Bryant Gumbel, Colin Powell and Dick Gregory to name a few. He and his twin brother, also a photographer, worked on a book highlighting their work
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Freddie Lucas( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Business consultant and lobbyist Freddie Hill Lucas was born on January 4, 1936 in Lynchburg, Virginia. Lucas spent most of her childhood years growing up on the campus of Morgan University where both of her parents were professors. Her father, Talmadge Hill, was the coach of Morgan's basketball team and a health instructor. Her mother, Frances Hill, was a music professor. In 1952, she earned her high school diploma from Frederick Douglass High School. After working as an assistant professor at several universities, she transitioned into the corporate world. From 1968 until 1976 Lucas worked for J.C. Penney Company and became the company's first female and African-American lobbyist. From 1976 to 1995, she worked as a lobbyist for General Motors. She was also a consultant for a company she and her husband, C. Payne Lucas, started, Lodestar, LLC. She was a member of the NAACP and American League of Lobbyists
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Orlando L. Taylor( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Academic administrator and professor Orlando Taylor was born on August 9, 1936 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. He earned his B.S. degree in education from Hampton University in 1957, and his M.A. degree in 1960 from Indiana University. He earned his Ph.D. degree in education at the University of Michigan in 1966. From 1958 to 1960, Taylor worked as a speech-language clinician, identifying speech disorders in patients. From 1960 to 1962, he was the director of the speech and hearing clinic at Fort Wayne State School in Indiana. Taylor was a professor of communication sciences at the University of the District of Columbia from 1970 to 1973. In 1972, Taylor and several other colleagues coined the term Ebonics to describe black speech patterns. In 1973, Taylor joined the faculty at Howard University where he served in several, including dean of the Graduate School, vice provost for research and a professor in the School of Communications
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Daphne Maxwell Reid( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Actress and producer Daphne Reid was born in New York City on July 13, 1948. After attending the Bronx High School for Science, Reid received a scholarship to Northwestern University, where she graduated in 1970, and became Northwestern’s first black homecoming queen, as well as the first African American to grace the cover of Glamour magazine. In 1979, Reid made her television debut on The Duke, and went on to notable guest appearances on The A-Team, WKRP in Cincinnati and Simon & Simon, among other programs. In 1993, Reid took over the role of Aunt Viv on The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, remaining until 1996. In 1997, she and her husband, Tim Reid, founded their own production company, New Millennium Studios, in Virginia, the first African American production operation since Oscar Micheaux’s to handle projects from start to finish. Reid was an accomplished photographer, and also appeared on UPN’s sitcom Eve
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Wilford Taylor( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Judge Wilford Taylor, Jr. was born on January 15, 1950 in Newport News, Virginia. He earned his high school diploma in 1968 from Hampton High, and his B.S. degree in business management from Hampton Institute in 1972. From 1972 until 1975, he served in the army and attended school, earning his M.A. degree from the University of Richmond in 1975. In 1978, Taylor earned his law degree from the College of William and Mary. He worked at Scott and Taylor from 1979 until 1981, and later at Scott, Coles, Brown, Taylor and Melvin. From 1983 until 1985, Taylor worked as the deputy city attorney for Hampton. In 1985, Taylor become Hampton’s first full time African American judge. He served as a judge in the General District Court until 1995, when he was appointed to the Circuit Court. He also taught trial advocacy and therapeutic jurisprudence at Hampton
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Rachel Brown( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Educator Rachel Hall Brown was born on November 16, 1912, in Glen Burnie, Maryland. She graduated from Douglas High School in Baltimore in 1928. She earned a Teacher’s Certificate from Coppin State Normal School (later Coppin State University) in Baltimore 1930; her B. S. degree in education from Morgan State University in Baltimore in 1947; her M. A. degree in education from New York University in 1955. She began her teaching career in a two-room schoolhouse in Anne Arundel County. She was a teacher and administrator in several schools. She and her husband, Phillip L. Brown, Sr., launched an effort for equal pay for African-American teachers in Maryland. In 1966, the Browns advocated for the integration of Anne Arundel County Public Schools. She was also active in civic and volunteer organizations. She retired from the in 1973. Rachel Hall Brown passed away on April 12, 2012 at age 99
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Robert Mack Bell( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Appellate Court Judge and lawyer the Honorable Robert Mack Bell was born on July 6, 1943 in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. In 1960, he participated in a sit-in at a Baltimore restaurant, where he was arrested and convicted for trespassing. Bell was the lead defendant in the case's appeal, Bell v. Maryland, before the U.S. Supreme Court. After earning his A.B. degree from Morgan State College in 1966, he went on to receive his J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1969. After several years in a law firm, Bell was appointed judge of the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City in 1975. He continued to climb, serving as judge for the Circuit Court for Baltimore, the Court of Special Appeals in Maryland and the Court of Appeals of Maryland. In 1996, Bell became the first African American Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Rosalyn Terborg-Penn( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Professor Rosalyn Terborg-Penn was born on October 22, 1941 in Brooklyn, New York. Finishing John Adams High School in 1959, Terborg-Penn graduated from Queens College in 1963 with her B.A. degree in history. In 1967, she earned her M.A. degree in U.S. and diplomatic history from George Washington University. In 1978, Terborg-Penn earned her Ph.D. degree from Howard University with a concentration in Afro-American history before 1865. Terborg-Penn began her teaching career at Morgan State College in 1969. She has held several positions, including coordinator of the African Afro-American studies program, Morgan State oral history project director, project director of the Ph.D. history program, and campus coordinator of the Cornell-Morgan distance learning project. Terborg-Penn was an adjunct faculty member at Howard Community College and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The author of numerous publications on the struggles and triumphs of African American women throughout history, she received scores of awards and honors
The HistoryMakers video oral history with C. Payne Lucas( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nonprofit executive C. Payne Lucas was born on September 14, 1933 in Spring Hope, North Carolina. After graduating from Spaulding High School in 1951, he attended the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore where he received his B.S. degree in history. He earned his M.S. degree in government from the American University in 1961. In 1961, he joined the Peace Corps under the agency's first Director, Sargent Shriver. From 1962 to 1971, Lucas served as Assistant Country Director in Togo, Country Director in Niger, Director of the Africa Region and Director of the Returned Volunteers. In 1971, Lucas became the president of Africare, an organization he co- Today, Africare was the oldest and largest African-American nonprofit organization specializing in aid to Africa. After 31 years as president, Lucas retired from Africare in 2002. He served as chief executive officer of Lodestar LLC, a domestic and international development consulting firm
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Benjamin Whitten( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nonprofit executive and educator Benjamin Carr Whitten was born on July 25, 1923 in Wilmington, Delaware. In 1939, Whitten earned his diploma at the age of fifteen from Howard High School. Whitten earned his B.S. degree from Pennsylvania State University in 1943. He was drafted into the military and served in the United States Army from 1943 to 1946. He furthered his education at Penn State, earning his M.A. degree in 1948 and his Ed.D degree in 1960. In 1948, Whitten joined the staff of the Baltimore City Schools as an industrial arts teacher. In 1976, he was a candidate for superintendent of Baltimore city schools and retired from the school system in 1979. After his retirement, he served as director of the Minority Contractors Technical and Assistance Program. He served in this post until 1983, when he accepted the position of Baltimore City Urban League President, a job he held until 1988. He passed away on September 21, 2012
The HistoryMakers video oral history with George Russell( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lawyer and political campaign manager George Levi Russell, Jr. was born on March 19, 1929 in Baltimore, Maryland. Earning his A.B. degree in economics from Lincoln University in 1950, he attended the University of Maryland, where he earned his law degree. In 1967, Russell became the first African American to sit on the Circuit Court in Maryland and the Appellate Court in the state. From 1968 to 1974, he was the first African American City Solicitor for Baltimore City. In 1982, he established Harbor Bank, and in 1986, merged his all black firm with a predominately white firm, Piper and Marbury, one of the top 100 law firms in the country. In 2002, Russell was appointed chairperson of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, the largest museum on the East Coast dedicated to African American history and culture at the time
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Reverend Curtis Harris( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mayor and minister Curtis West Harris was born on July 1, 1924 in Denron, Virginia. After earning his high school diploma from Carter G. Woodson High School in 1944, he attended Virginia Union University. In 1959, Harris became pastor of Union Baptist Church. In 1950, he was president of Hopewell’s NAACP and participated in the Selma to Montgomery march. In 1963, he successfully fought the City of Hopewell, Virginia preventing it from building a landfill in the African American community. In 1964, Harris' two sons helped integrate Hopewell High School. In 1983, he forced the city to switch its at-large voting system to a ward system. He became the first African American to serve on the Hopewell city council. In 1996, Harris was the first African American Vice-Mayor. He became the first black mayor in 1998. In 2004, Harris' formerly segregated school high school named a library in his honor
 
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English (20)