WorldCat Identities

Lepkowski, James

Overview
Works: 5 works in 11 publications in 1 language and 103 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by James Lepkowski
Panel Study of Income Dynamics, 1989-1990 : Latino Sample by Sandra L Hofferth( )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is an ongoing data collection effort begun in 1968 in an attempt to fill the need for a better understanding of the determinants of family income and its changes. The PSID has continued to trace individuals from the original national sample of approximately 4,800 households, whether those individuals are living in the same dwelling or with the same people. The investigators hoped to discover whether most short-term changes in economic status are due to forces outside the family or if they can be traced to something in the individual's own background or in the pattern of his or her thinking and behavior. The data can shed light on what causes family income to rise above or fall below the poverty line. In line with the theoretical model, the questions asked fall generally under the headings of economic status, economic behavior, demographics, and attitudes. Specifically, they deal with topics such as employment, income sources and amounts, housing, car ownership, food expenditures, transportation, do-it-yourself home maintenance and car repairs, education, disability, time use, family background, family composition changes, and residential location. This collection is comprised of the PSID Latino sample data. For these files, a Latino was defined as having at least one parent solely of Mexican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican ancestry, or having at least two (any two) grandparents solely of Mexican, Cuban, or Puerto Rican ancestry. Part 1, 1990 Latino Sample Family-Individual File, offers data on individuals who were members of the 2,043 households in the 1990 PSID Latino sample. This sample was taken from Temple University's 1989 Latino National Political Survey (LNPS). To permit comparisons across ethnic groups, a second file, Part 2, 1989 Core Sample Family-Individual File for Use With Latino Sample, is provided. This file contains da ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03203
Panel Study of Income Dynamics, 1968-1999 : Supplemental Files by Sandra Hofferth( )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is an ongoing data collection effort begun in 1968 in an attempt to fill the need for a better understanding of the determinants of family income and its changes. The PSID has continued to trace individuals from the original national sample of approximately 4,800 households, whether those individuals are living in the same dwelling or with the same people. The investigators hoped to discover whether most short-term changes in economic status are due to forces outside the family or if they can be traced to something in the individual's own background or in the pattern of his or her thinking and behavior. The data can shed light on what causes family income to rise above or fall below the poverty line. In line with the theoretical model, the questions asked fall generally under the headings of economic status, economic behavior, demographics, and attitudes. Specifically, they deal with topics such as employment, income sources and amounts, housing, car ownership, food expenditures, transportation, do-it-yourself home maintenance and car repairs, education, disability, time use, family background, family composition changes, and residential location. In the early years, respondents were asked supplemental questions about their housing and neighborhood characteristics, child care, achievement motivation, job training, and retirement plans. In more recent years, special topics have included extensive supplements on education, military combat experience, health, kinship networks, and wealth. Supplemental datasets, each with detailed information about a particular topic collected over the years, are released separately from the core files (PANEL STUDY OF INCOME DYNAMICS, 1968-1999: ANNUAL CORE DATA [ICPSR 7439]). Supplemental information on additional topics, such as flows of time and money, help among families and their friends, and ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03202.xml
Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC) : a Study of Spousal Bereavement in the Detroit Area, 1987-1993 by Randolph M Nesse( )

2 editions published in 2003 in No Linguistic content and English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC) is a large multi-wave prospective study of spousal bereavement. Face-to-face baseline interviews with married older adults in the Detroit, Michigan standardized metropolitan statistical area (SMSA) were conducted between June 1987 and April 1988, and follow-up interviews were conducted at six months (Wave 1), 18 months (Wave 2), and 48 months (Wave 3) after a spouse's death. Each widowed person was assigned a same-age, same-sex, same-race matched control from the baseline sample. Controls were interviewed again at each of the three follow-ups as well. Spousal loss was monitored using state-provided monthly death records and through daily obituaries from local area newspapers. The National Death Index (NDI) and direct ascertainment of death certificates were used to confirm all deaths. The primary strength of the CLOC study is its ability to measure spousal bereavement quantitatively. For this purpose a global grief scale and six grief subscales, unique to the CLOC study, were prepared. Depression was measured for all respondents with conceptualizations of depression at each wave, as well as major depressive episodes according to DSM-III-R criteria. Other survey questions focused on the social, psychological, and physical functioning of older adults (e.g., demographic, financial, housing, life events, social support, work and activities, marriage and family, religion, health and well-being). For a portion of the respondents (n = 432) in what was referred to as the MacBat study, various biomedical indicators (motor and cognitive, physiological, endocrinological and biochemical) were measured as well. The CLOC study has been subset into four primary datasets. The core, or Complete, dataset (Part 1) contains all available variables from all four waves of the study (Baseline, W1, W2, W3) for the entire sample of 1,532 persons (excludi ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03370
Panel Study of Income Dynamics, 1968-1999: Annual Core Data by Sandra Hofferth( )

2 editions published in 1984 in No Linguistic content and English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) is an ongoing data collection effort begun in 1968 in an attempt to fill the need for a better understanding of the determinants of family income and its changes. Core data are collected annually, with each new wave of family data constituting a separate data file (Parts 2-27, 201-205). Data on individuals are contained in Part 1, Cross-Year Individual File, 1968-1993 (Waves 1-26) [Public Release II], and an early release of individual-level data through 1999 is included in Part 201, Cross-Year Individual File, 1968-1999 (Waves 1-31) [Public Release I]. The PSID has continued to trace individuals from the original national sample of approximately 4,800 households, whether those individuals are living in the same dwelling or with the same people. The investigators hoped to discover whether most short-term changes in economic status are due to forces outside the family or if they can be traced to something in the individual's own background or in the pattern of his or her thinking and behavior. The data can shed light on what causes family income to rise above or fall below the poverty line. In line with the theoretical model, the questions asked fall generally under the headings of economic status, economic behavior, demographics, and attitudes. Specifically, they deal with topics such as employment, income sources and amounts, housing, car ownership, food expenditures, transportation, do-it-yourself home maintenance and car repairs, education, disability, time use, family background, family composition changes, and residential location. Content of a more sociological or psychological nature is also included in some waves of the study. Information gathered in the survey applies to the circumstances of the family unit as a whole (e.g., type of housing) or to particular persons in the family unit (e.g., age, earnings). While some ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/07439.xml
A Model for Neck Injury in the Helmeted Human( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The temporal events and injury forces and energies following impact of the helmeted and unhelmeted human have not been fully described. To further advance our understanding in this area, a lumped parameter model with one-dimensional motion along the spinal axis has been developed. The muscles and ligaments and overlying tissue are assumed to offer negligible resistance in compression and the skull stiffness is neglected. Torso mass is reduced appropriately to account for the angle of impact of the person with another human or fixed object. The lumped parameter model with springs and viscous elements representing the neck, helmet, and contact surface is given
 
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