WorldCat Identities

Morrison, James F.

Overview
Works: 31 works in 35 publications in 1 language and 68 library holdings
Genres: History  Registers (Lists)  Biography  Genealogy  Military history 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: E236, 973.336
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by James F Morrison
The burning of the valleys : daring raids from Canada against the New York frontier in the fall of 1780 by Gavin K Watt( )

3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Details the actions of both sides in this exciting and incredibly effective British campaign in the War of Independence
A history of Fulton County in the Revolution by James F Morrison( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The British campaign of 1777 : the St. Leger expedition by Gavin K Watt( Book )

3 editions published between 2001 and 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

List of pupils arriving at the ages of 16, 17 and 18 years during the year 1908 in the Soldiers' Orphan Schools of Pennsylvania by Pennsylvania( Book )

1 edition published in 1908 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Second Battalion (or better known as) the Palatine District Regiment : 1775-1784 by James F Morrison( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Colonel James Livingston, the forgotten Livingston patriot of the War of Independence by James F Morrison( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Raids on the Canajohary, 1780 : in the words of those who served( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service Southern Region, 1911-2012( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting for smaller scale administrative units, including USFS National Forest System regions and individual National Forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1911 to 2012 for the USFS Southern Region. For the Southern Region as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at approximately 400,000 megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year in the late 1950s through the early 1980s, with peak cumulative storage to date of 24.9 million MgC occurring in 2012. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels in the mid-1950s through the mid-1990s. Harvest levels have been erratic since the late 1990s, yet carbon entering the HWP pool continues to increase. Following 5 years beginning in 2002 when emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites exceeded additions from harvesting, the Southern Region HWP pool is now in a period of positive net annual stock change because additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest exceeds the decay of products harvested between 1911 and 2012. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, which are also being developed through the Forest Management Carbon Framework (ForCaMF), regional level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on the Southern Region as a whole, this accounting method can be applied more broadly at smaller land management units, such as National Forests."
Regional and forest-level estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from the United States Forest Service Northern Region, 1906-2010 by Nathaniel M Anderson( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of CO2 through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting at the scale of smaller administrative units, including USFS Regions and individual national forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach and the California Forest Project Protocol (CFPP) to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1906 to 2010 for the USFS Northern Region and its eleven national forests, which span northern Idaho, Montana, South Dakota, and eastern Washington. For the Northern Region as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at one million megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year in the mid-1960s, with peak cumulative storage of 28 million MgC occurring in 1995. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels in the middle of the twentieth century. Harvest levels declined after 1970, resulting in less carbon entering the HWP pool. Since 1995, emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites have exceeded additions from harvesting, resulting in a decline in the total amount of carbon stored in the HWP pool. The Northern Region HWP pool is now in a period of negative net annual stock change because the decay of products harvested between 1906 and 2010 exceeds additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest. Though most individual national forests mirror Regional-level trends in harvest and carbon flux, the timing and magnitude of change differs among forests with some forests departing notably from Regional trends. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, Regional and Forest-level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on national forests in the Northern Region, we provide a framework by which these accounting methods can be applied more broadly at sub-national scales to other regions, land management units, and firms."
Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region, 1909-2012( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting for smaller scale administrative units, including USFS National Forest System regions and individual National Forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1909 to 2012 from harvests on the national forests in the USFS Pacific Northwest Region. For the Pacific Northwest Region as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at over 1 million megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year between the late 1940's and the early 1990's, with peak cumulative storage between 143 million and 144 million MgC spanning 1992-1995. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels during the 1960's through the 1980's. In the years between the late 1960s and 1990 timber harvest were at high but volatile levels, with harvests exceeding 10.6 million ccf (8 million MgC) twice during this period. Harvest levels from national forests have since declined to less than 1.3 million ccf (1 million MgC) per year, resulting in less carbon entering the HWP pool. Since 1995, emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites have exceeded additions from harvesting, resulting in a decline in the total amount of carbon stored in the HWP pool. The Pacific Northwest Region's HWP pool is now in a period of negative net annual stock change because the decay of products harvested between 1909 and 2012 exceeds additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, which are also being developed through the Forest Management Carbon Framework (ForCaMF), regional level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on the Pacific Northwest Region as a whole, this accounting method can be applied more broadly at smaller land management units, such as National Forests."
Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service Eastern Region, 1911-2012( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting for smaller scale administrative units, including USFS National Forest System regions and individual National Forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1911 to 2012 for the USFS Eastern Region. For the Eastern Region as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing steadily from 100,000 megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year in the early 1950s up to 416,000 MgC in 1987, with peak cumulative storage to date of slightly less than 12.7 million MgC occurring in 2013. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels in the 1980s and 1990s. Harvest levels have declined since the 1990s and have been erratic since the year 2000, yet carbon entering the HWP pool continues to increase. The Eastern Region HWP pool has always been in a state of positive net annual stock change because additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest exceeds the decay of products harvested between 1911 and 2012. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, which are also being developed through the Forest Management Carbon Framework (ForCaMF), regional level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on the Eastern Region as a whole, this accounting method can be applied more broadly at smaller land management units, such as National Forests."
Colonel Jacob Klock and the Palatine District by James F Morrison( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region, 1909-2012( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting for smaller scale administrative units, including USFS National Forest System regions and individual National Forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1909 to 2012 for the USFS Pacific Southwest Region. For the Pacific Southwest Region as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at just below 1 million megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year beginning in the late 1940's until the early 1990's, with peak cumulative storage of 51 million MgC occurring in 1994. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels during the 1960's through 1980's. In the years between the late 1960s and 1990 timber harvest were at high but volatile levels, with high harvests of over 4.3 million ccf (3.2 million MgC) occurring five times during this period, harvest levels from National Forests have since declined to less than 1.1 million ccf (0.8 million MgC) per year, resulting in less carbon entering the HWP pool. Since 1995, emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites exceeded additions from harvesting, resulting in a decline in the total amount of carbon stored in the HWP pool. The Pacific Southwest Region's HWP pool is now in a period of negative net annual stock change because the decay of products harvested between 1909 and 2012 exceeds additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, which are also being developed through the Forest Management Carbon Framework (ForCaMF), Regional level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on the Pacific Southwest Region as a whole, this accounting method can be applied more broadly at smaller land management units, such as National Forests."
Soldiers and incidents of the American Revolution in the Mohawk & Schoharie Valley by James F Morrison( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service Alaska Region, 1910-2012( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting for smaller scale administrative units, including USFS National Forest System regions and individual National Forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1910 to 2012 for the USFS Alaska Region. For the Alaska Region as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at nearly one-half million megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with peak cumulative storage of 13.5 million MgC occurring in 1996. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels in the mid-1950s through the 1990s. Harvest levels declined after 1990, resulting in less carbon entering the HWP pool. Since 2005, emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites have exceeded additions from harvesting, resulting in a decline in the total amount of carbon stored in the HWP pool. The Alaska Region HWP pool is now in a period of negative net annual stock change because the decay of products harvested between 1910 and 2012 exceeds additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, which are also being developed through the Forest Management Carbon Framework (ForCaMF), regional level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on the Alaska Region as a whole, this accounting method can be applied more broadly at smaller land management units, such as National Forests."
Climate projections FAQ( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Climate scenarios offer one way to identify and examine the land management challenges posed by climate change. Selecting projections, however, requires careful consideration of the natural resources under study, and where and how they are sensitive to climate. Selection also depends on the robustness of different projections for the resources and geographic area of interest, and possibly on what climate projections are available for a region. Rather than a misguided attempt to identify the "most accurate" climate scenario, managers are strongly encouraged to explore variability through the use of multiple climate scenarios. Considering a range of possible future climates facilitates the identification of management strategies to help ensure resilience of natural resource systems across a broad set of potential conditions. Downscaling climate projections increases the spatial resolution of climate information and can make projections more relevant to natural resource managers by allowing decision-makers to better visualize what these different futures imply locally and regionally. The following series of questions describes key concepts that end-users of climate projection products should understand to appropriately interpret downscaled climate projections, including various sources of uncertainty. The selection used for each component of a downscaled climate projection has implications for interpreting the resulting climate scenario. Understanding the merits and limitations of the downscaling method employed is also important since downscaling approaches vary in their dependence on observed data availability, computational requirements, and in resultant uncertainty owed to biases of the method or the spatial scale of the downscaling."
Fort Plain & Fort Plank ; Two Fort Plain Revolutionary War forts( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Estimates of carbon stored in harvested wood products from United States Forest Service's Sierra Nevada Bio-Regional Assessment Area of the Pacific Southwest Region, 1909-2012( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Global forests capture and store significant amounts of carbon through photosynthesis. When carbon is removed from forests through harvest, a portion of the harvested carbon is stored in wood products, often for many decades. The United States Forest Service (USFS) and other agencies are interested in accurately accounting for carbon flux associated with harvested wood products (HWP) to meet greenhouse gas monitoring commitments and climate change adaptation and mitigation objectives. National-level forest carbon accounting has been in place for over a decade, but there is an increasing need for accounting for smaller scale administrative units, including USFS National Forest System regions and individual National Forests. This paper uses the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) production accounting approach to estimate HWP carbon storage from 1909 to 2012 for the USFS Sierra Nevada Bio-Regional Assessment Area (Assessment Area) of the Pacific Southwest Region. For the Assessment Area as a whole, carbon stocks in the HWP pool were increasing at just above 0.5 million megagrams of carbon (MgC) per year beginning in the late 1940's until the early 1990's, with peak cumulative storage to date of 32 million MgC occurring in 1999. Net positive flux into the HWP pool over this period is primarily attributable to high harvest levels during the 1960's through 1980's. In the years between the late 1960s and 1990 timber harvest were at high but volatile levels, with high harvests of over 2.5 million ccf (1.8 million MgC) occurring six times during this period, harvest levels from National Forests have since declined to less than 0.7 million ccf (0.5 million MgC) per year, resulting in less carbon entering the HWP pool. Since 2000, emissions from HWP at solid waste disposal sites exceeded additions from harvesting, resulting in a decline in the total amount of carbon stored in the HWP pool. The Assessment Area's HWP pool is now in a period of negative net annual stock change because the decay of products harvested between 1909 and 2012 exceeds additions of carbon to the HWP pool through harvest. Together with estimates of ecosystem carbon, which are also being developed through the Forest Management Carbon Framework (ForCaMF), regional level estimates of HWP carbon flux can be used to inform management decisions and guide climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts by the agency. Though our emphasis is on the Assessment Area, this accounting method can be applied more broadly at smaller land management units, such as National Forests."
A synthesis of the science on forests and carbon for U.S. forests( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Forests play an important role in the U.S. and global carbon cycle, and carbon sequestered by U.S. forest growth and harvested wood products currently offsets 12-19% of U.S. fossil fuel emissions. The cycle of forest growth, death, and regeneration and the use of wood removed from the forest complicate efforts to understand and measure forest carbon pools and flows. Our report explains these processes and examines the science behind mechanisms proposed for increasing the amount of carbon stored in forests and using wood to offset fossil fuel use. We also examine the tradeoffs, costs, and benefits associated with each mechanism and explain how forest carbon is measured."
Colonel Jacob Klock( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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The burning of the valleys : daring raids from Canada against the New York frontier in the fall of 1780
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