WorldCat Identities

Pacheco, Gail

Overview
Works: 21 works in 26 publications in 1 language and 52 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Gail Pacheco
Do non-economic quality of life factors drive immigration? by Joshua J Lewer( )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This paper generates two unique non-economic quality of life indices and tests their role on recent migration patterns."
Intergenerational welfare participation in New Zealand by Tim Maloney( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Parenthood and labour market outcomes by Isabelle Sin( Book )

3 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates the drivers of the gender pay gapin New Zealand, with a particular focus on the role of parenthood wage penalties. As with other nations, the gender pay gap is larger in New Zealand among parents than non-parents, though the mechanisms driving this relationship are not entirely clear. This paper is an initial exploration of what can be learned by combining administrative wage data, birth records, and survey data on hours worked and earnings. It examines the distribution of how long women are out of paid employment after having their first child and how this differs with pre-parenthood income, considers employment rates and wage earnings among employed women each month in the five years before and ten years after birth of their first child, and compares women who spend different lengths of time out of employment both overall and within each pre-parenthood earnings quartile. The findings indicate that parenthood contributes to the gender pay gap by penalising all women, particularly those who are on high incomes, and setting them on a trajectory of lower lifetime earnings relative to their male peers
Empirical evidence of the gender pay gap in New Zealand : report commissioned by the Ministry for Women, New Zealand, March 2017 by Gail Pacheco( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A portrait of minimum wage workers in New Zealand : 1997·2004 by Gail Pacheco( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The New Zealand diversity survey report, October 2015 by Tim Bentley( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Residential movement within New Zealand : quantifying and characterising the transient population by Nan Jiang( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Changes in intra-city employment patterns: a spatial analysis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

<Title><x>Abstract</x></title><sec><title>Purpose</title>- The purpose of this paper is to investigate area-level labour market dynamics from a spatial perspective. This analysis is aimed at better understanding what socio-economic actors are associated with shifts in unemployment rates across a major metropolitan city.</sec><sec><title>Design/methodology/approach</title>- Based on two waves of New Zealand census data, this paper combines a seemingly unrelated regression approach (allowing for relaxation of the assumption that residuals from models of different employment states are unrelated) with a spatial lag model.</sec><sec><title>Findings</title>- The key socio-economic drivers associated with intra-city employment dynamics were vehicle access, dependency rates and educational attainment. Importantly, the identification of spatial autocorrelation with respect to employment status patterns within this major New Zealand city motivates a case for heterogeneous employment policies across the city.</sec><sec><title>Originality/value</title>- This research improves the understanding of changes in labour market status rates within a city region. This is done by inclusion of two important considerations: a spatial perspective to labour market dynamics at an intra-city level; and formally modelling the interdependence across the four potential labour market outcomes (being full-time, part-time, unemployed or out of the labour force). Overall, there was clear empirical support for the need to include spatial considerations when using targeted policy to help lift areas out of unemployment.</sec>
Impact of the minimum wage on expected profits by Gail PACHECO( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The impact of child welfare legislation on domestic violence-related homicide rates( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

State-specific statutes providing legal consequences for perpetrating domestic violence in the presence of a child have been enacted across the United States between 1996 and 2012. This paper examines the impact of this child welfare legislation, using a difference-in-differences approach. We find a significant drop in domestic violence-related homicide rates, when considering a wide range of victim-offender relationships. However, this result does not hold for marital homicides, suggesting that for this subpopulation, the risk of reprisal and consequent reduction in reporting may be counterbalancing the hypothesized deterrent impacts of the legislation
Y-NEET : empirical evidence for New Zealand by Gail Pacheco( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Pre- and postnatal drivers of childhood intelligence : evidence from Singapore by Gail Pacheco( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In-work poverty in New Zealand : 2019 by Alexander Plum( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

What determines the long run growth in Kenya? by Saten Kumar( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lifting the long run growth rate is, arguably, the pursuit of every economy. What should Kenya do to enhance its long run growth rate? This paper attempts to answer this question by examining the determinants of total factor productivity (TFP) in Kenya. We utilized the theoretical insights from the Solow (1956) growth model and its extension by Mankiw, Romer and Weil (1992) and followed Senhadji's (2000) growth accounting procedure. We find that growth in Kenya, until the 1990s was mainly due to factor accumulation. Since then, TFP has made a small contribution to growth. Our findings imply that while variables like overseas development aid, foreign direct investment and progress of financial sector improves TFP, trade openness is the key determinant. Consequently, policy makers should focus on policies that improve trade openness if long run growth rate is to be raised
Explaining ethnic disparities in bachelor's qualifications : participation, retention and completion in NZ, February 2017 by Lisa Meehan( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Special issue: Quality of life research in economics( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Special issue: Temporary employment( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Contribution of rural banks to regional economic growth : a thesis submitted to Auckland University of Technology in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), 2016 by Laksmi Yustika Devi( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Following the literature on the relationship between financial development, economic growth and the poverty rate, this present study empirically examined the links between rural bank development, economic growth, and the poverty rate at the sub-regional level in Indonesia. The contribution of this research is based on its utilisation of regional variation in rural bank development (over time) to explain the complex relationship between this development and both economic growth and the poverty rate. The first objective of this study was to address the causal relationship between rural bank development and either economic growth or the poverty rate. The second objective was to analyse whether central bank policies or regional government policies on rural banks have had an impact on the development of the banks in Indonesia, and particularly whether the policies have had an impact on the contribution of rural banks to regional economic growth and regional poverty rate reduction. Two methodologies were used in this study. The first methodology was cointegration tests and an error correction based causality test. The second methodology was two stage least squares. The findings of this study were: 1) Cointegration tests indicate that there is a long-run relationship between rural bank assets and regional GDP per capita, and between rural bank assets and the regional poverty rate; 2) DOLS and FMOLS estimations show that rural banks promote economic growth and reduce regional poverty; 3) There is no evidence that rural bank assets Granger-cause regional GDP per capita and the regional poverty rate. The direction of causality is the other way around, from regional GDP per capita to rural bank assets and from the regional poverty rate to rural bank assets; 4) Results of 2SLS estimation show that rural bank assets promote regional economic growth and reduce regional poverty; and 5) The 2SLS estimation also suggests that only one local regulation has a significant effect on the development of rural banks which is local regulation on the development of SMEs. Meanwhile, the national regulations positively and significantly affect rural bank assets, except for developed regions
Not much bounce in the springboard on the mobility of low pay workers by Gail Pacheco( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Estimating economic earnings mobility is imperative for understanding the degree to which low pay employment is a temporary or long-term position. The current literature estimates transition probabilities between low and higher pay. This study extends the focus to identify the underlying pecuniary wage change via construction of an intermediate pay zone marginally above low pay. Utilising monthly administrative data we find that individuals with a strong attachment to the low pay sector have a very low probability of shifting into higher pay. Further, these individuals also have a substantially greater risk of experiencing a low pay-no pay cycle relative to those who are intermediate or higher paid. Notably, this finding is only uncovered using within year variation in wages to reveal intensity of labour market attachment
How to increase the growth rate in South Africa? by Saten Kumar( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Given the concern about the low growth rates in African countries, this paper deals with the issue of how to increase the said growth rates by using South Africa as a case study. This paper attempts to answer this question by examining the determinants of total factor productivity (TFP) and productivity growth. We utilise the theoretical insights from the Solow (1956) growth model and its extension by Mankiw, Romer and Weil (1992). Our empirical methodology is based on the London School of Economics Hendry's General to Specific Instrumental Variable method and Gregory and Hansen's (1996a; 1996b) structural break technique. Our findings imply that variables like human capital, trade openness, foreign direct investment, financial efficiency, democracy and financial reforms improves TFP and productivity growth in South Africa. Importantly, the key determinants appear to be democracy and financial liberalisation
 
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English (25)