WorldCat Identities

Plato Philosoph 427-347 v. Chr

Overview
Works: 101 works in 171 publications in 6 languages and 208 library holdings
Genres: History  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Fiction  Study guides  Glossaries, vocabularies, etc  Dictionaries 
Roles: Author
Classifications: JC71, 321.07
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Plato
Theätet ; Parmenides ; Philebos by Plato( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in German and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

La République by Plato( Book )

6 editions published between 1932 and 1996 in French and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Apologie des Sokrates by Plato( Book )

4 editions published between 1994 and 2011 in German and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cratylus by Plato( Book )

5 editions published between 1953 and 2012 in Greek, Ancient and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PLATO, the great philosopher of Athens, son of Ariston, was born in 427 B.C. In early manhood admirer of Socrates, he later founded the famous school of philosophy in the grove Academus. Much else recorded of his life is uncertain; that he left Athens for a time after Socrates' execution is probable; that later he went to Cyrene, Egypt, and Sicily is possible; that he was wealthy is likely; that he was critical of 'advanced' democracy is obvious. He lived to be 80 years old. Linguistic tests including those of computer science still try to establish the order of his extant philosophical dialogues, written in splendid prose and revealing Socrates' mind fused with Plato's thought. In Laches, Charmides, and Lysis, Socrates and others discuss separate ethical conceptions. Protagoras, Io, and Meno discuss whether righteousness can be taught. In Gorias, Socrates is estranged from his city's thought, and his fate is impending. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate to the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love. Cratylus discusses the nature of language and the great masterpiece in 10 books, the Republic, concerns righteousness (and involves education, equality of the sexes, socialism, communism, and even abolition of slavery). Of the 6 so called 'dialectical" dialogues Euthydemus deals with philosophy; meta-physical Parmenides about general concepts and absolute being; Theaetetus reasons about the theory of knowledge; of its sequels, Sophist deals with not-being; Politicus with good and bad statesmanship and governments; Philebus with what is good. The Timaeus seeks the origin of the visible universe out of abstract geometrical elements. The unfinished Critias treats of lost Atlantis. Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the 12 books Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept. Of a dozen other extant dialogues and also some letters a few may be genuine. Six other extant dialogues have been rejected as spurious since ancient times
Der Staat = Politeia : griechisch-deutsch by Plato( Book )

5 editions published between 1839 and 1990 in German and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mit seinem Werk Politeia ("Der Staat") wurde Platon zum Begründer einer neuen literarischen Gattung: der politisch-philosophischen Utopie. Schon im Altertum versuchten eine Reihe von Autoren ihm nachzueifern (Theopompos, Euhemeros, Iambulos, parodistisch auch Lukian), und nachdem Thomas Morus mit dem namengebenden Werk "Utopia" (1516) die Gattung gleichsam neu belebt hatte, entstand eine nicht mehr zu überblickende Flut utopischer Entwürfe. Doch nicht nur durch die hier entfaltete Staatslehre erwies sich die "Politeia" als grundlegendes und richtungsweisendes Werk: Platons Ausführungen zu solch verschiedenen philosophischen Gebieten wie der Theorie der Erziehung, der Theorie der Dichtung, der Ethik und Tugendlehre, der Seelenlehre haben die Diskussion bis in unsere Tage beeinflusst. Platon ist aber auch ein Sprachkünstler, der seine Werke als Dialog-"Dramen" meisterhaft gestaltete. Dabei weiß er sich souverän von dem Medium Schrift zu distanzieren, das drei Hauptmängel aufweist: Sie sagt immer dasselbe, kann auf Fragen nicht antworten; sie wendet sich unterschiedslos an alle, weiß nicht, zu wem sie reden und zu wem sie schweigen soll; und wird sie angegriffen, so kann sie sich nicht selbst zur Hilfe kommen. Dass der Kern der platonischen Ideenlehre nicht in dafür ungeeignete Köpfe "gepflanzt" werden kann, beweist das Erste Buch: Das aufgezwungene Gespräch über die Gerechtigkeit mit Polemarchos und dem Sophisten Thrasymachos endet in einer Aporie (so wie Platons Versuche, seine politische Theorie in die Praxis umzusetzen, an der mangelnden Eignung des jungen Herrschers von Syrakus, Dionysios II., scheitern mussten). Erst als Platon (von Buch II an) mit seinen Brüdern Glaukon und Adeimantos das Gesprächsthema wieder aufgreift, kann der Funken der Erkenntnis überspringen, und "Einsicht leuchtet auf"
Sämtliche Werke by Plato( Book )

in German and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The republic by Plato( Book )

5 editions published between 1963 and 2004 in Greek, Ancient and English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New translation of Plato's Republic
Sokrates im Gespräch : vier Dialoge by Plato( Book )

2 editions published between 1953 and 1954 in German and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bevat eerder afzonderlijk verschenen vertalingen van de Apologie, Crito, Phaedo en het Symposium
Platonis opera by Plato( Book )

5 editions published in 1517 in Latin and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

La République by Plato( Book )

4 editions published between 1933 and 1996 in French and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Timaeus by Plato( Book )

4 editions published between 1961 and 2012 in Greek, Ancient and English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Donald J. Zeyl's translation of Timaeus is presented along with his 75 page introductory essay, which discusses points of contemporary interest in the Timaeus, deals at length with long-standing and current issues of interpretation, and provides a consecutive commentary on the work as a whole
Phaedo by Plato( Book )

6 editions published between 1810 and 1959 in 3 languages and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The notes also aim to provide the kind of help with Plato's Greek which is needed by comparative beginners in the language, but the commentary is intended for any student, classical scholar, or philosopher with an interest in the close reading of Plato
Laches ; Protagoras ; Meno ; Euthydemus by Plato( Book )

4 editions published between 1962 and 2012 in Greek, Ancient and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PLATO, the great philosopher of Athens, son of Ariston, was born in 427 B.C. In early manhood admirer of Socrates, he later founded the famous school of philosophy in the grove Academus. Much else recorded of his life is uncertain; that he left Athens for a time after Socrates' execution is probable; that later he went to Cyrene, Egypt, and Sicily is possible; that he was wealthy is likely; that he was critical of 'advanced' democracy is obvious. He lived to be 80 years old. Linguistic tests including those of computer science still try to establish the order of his extant philosophical dialogues, written in splendid prose and revealing Socrates' mind fused with Plato's thought. In Laches, Charmides, and Lysis, Socrates and others discuss separate ethical conceptions. Protagoras, Io, and Meno discuss whether righteousness can be taught. In Gorias, Socrates is estranged from his city's thought, and his fate is impending. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate to the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love. Cratylus discusses the nature of language and the great masterpiece in 10 books, the Republic, concerns righteousness (and involves education, equality of the sexes, socialism, communism, and even abolition of slavery). Of the 6 so called 'dialectical" dialogues Euthydemus deals with philosophy; meta-physical Parmenides about general concepts and absolute being; Theaetetus reasons about the theory of knowledge; of its sequels, Sophist deals with not-being; Politicus with good and bad statesmanship and governments; Philebus with what is good. The Timaeus seeks the origin of the visible universe out of abstract geometrical elements. The unfinished Critias treats of lost Atlantis. Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the 12 books Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept. Of a dozen other extant dialogues and also some letters a few may be genuine. Six other extant dialogues have been rejected as spurious since ancient times
Statesman by Plato( Book )

3 editions published between 1952 and 1975 in Greek, Ancient and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Statesman is Plato's neglected political work, but it is crucial for an understanding of the development of his political thinking. In some respects it continues themes from the Republic, particularly the importance of knowledge as entitlement to rule. But there are also changes: Plato has dropped the ambitious metaphysical synthesis of the Republic, changed his view of the moral psychology of the citizen, and revised his position on the role of law and institutions
Kratylos by Plato( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in German and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Parmenides' lesson : translation and explication of Plato's Parmenides by Plato( Book )

3 editions published between 1923 and 1998 in French and Italian and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A dialogue in which old Parmenides advises the youthful Socrates to argue by the Zenonian method. This is one of Plato's dialectical dialogues"--Provided by publisher
Œuvres complètes by Platón( Book )

in French and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Plato's theory of knowledge; the Theaetetus and the Sophist of Plato by Plato( Book )

3 editions published between 1949 and 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Translated by the noted classical scholar Francis M. Cornford, this edition of two masterpieces of Plato's later period features extensive ongoing commentaries by Cornford that provide helpful background information and valuable insights. Both works pose eternal questions that keep these dialogs ever-relevant not only for students of philosophy but also for every reader and thinker. The Theatetus offers a systematic treatment of the question, "What is knowledge?" Most of the dialog takes place between Socrates and the student Theatetus. Among the answers they explore: knowledge as perception; knowledge as true belief; knowledge as true belief plus an account (i.e., a justified true belief); as well as variations on each of these answers. Like most Socratic dialogs, the Theatetus ends without a definitive answer - leaving the subject open for the reader's further consideration. In the Sophist, a related dialog, Plato redefines the term "sophist," which hitherto had connoted one who gives sophia (wisdom) to his disciples. Plato depreciated the term, and ever since, in philosophy, sophistry indicates the deceptive exploitation of linguistic ambiguities. The dialog follows Socrates' cross-examination of a self-proclaimed true philosopher, The Stranger, on the distinction between philosophers, statesmen, and sophists
Platonis Euthydemus et Protagoras by Plato( Book )

2 editions published between 1839 and 1852 in Greek, Ancient and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lysis ; Symposium ; Gorgias by Plato( Book )

3 editions published between 1953 and 2012 in Greek, Ancient and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PLATO, the great philosopher of Athens, son of Ariston, was born in 427 B.C. In early manhood admirer of Socrates, he later founded the famous school of philosophy in the grove Academus. Much else recorded of his life is uncertain; that he left Athens for a time after Socrates' execution is probable; that later he went to Cyrene, Egypt, and Sicily is possible; that he was wealthy is likely; that he was critical of 'advanced' democracy is obvious. He lived to be 80 years old. Linguistic tests including those of computer science still try to establish the order of his extant philosophical dialogues, written in splendid prose and revealing Socrates' mind fused with Plato's thought. In Laches, Charmides, and Lysis, Socrates and others discuss separate ethical conceptions. Protagoras, Io, and Meno discuss whether righteousness can be taught. In Gorias, Socrates is estranged from his city's thought, and his fate is impending. The Apology (not a dialogue), Crito, Euthyphro, and the unforgettable Phaedo relate to the trial and death of Socrates and propound the immortality of the soul. In the famous Symposium and Phaedrus, written when Socrates was still alive, we find the origin and meaning of love. Cratylus discusses the nature of language and the great masterpiece in 10 books, the Republic, concerns righteousness (and involves education, equality of the sexes, socialism, communism, and even abolition of slavery). Of the 6 so called 'dialectical" dialogues Euthydemus deals with philosophy; meta-physical Parmenides about general concepts and absolute being; Theaetetus reasons about the theory of knowledge; of its sequels, Sophist deals with not-being; Politicus with good and bad statesmanship and governments; Philebus with what is good. The Timaeus seeks the origin of the visible universe out of abstract geometrical elements. The unfinished Critias treats of lost Atlantis. Unfinished also is Plato's last work of the 12 books Laws (Socrates is absent from it), a critical discussion of principles of law which Plato thought the Greeks might accept. Of a dozen other extant dialogues and also some letters a few may be genuine. Six other extant dialogues have been rejected as spurious since ancient times
 
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The republicTimaeusLaches ; Protagoras ; Meno ; EuthydemusStatesmanPlato's theory of knowledge; the Theaetetus and the Sophist of PlatoLysis ; Symposium ; Gorgias