WorldCat Identities

Ray, Gary L.

Overview
Works: 41 works in 82 publications in 1 language and 146 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: TA7,
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Gary L Ray
Ecological monitoring of a constructed intertidal flat at Jonesport, Me. by Gary L Ray( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

...Studies how infaunal sea life appears at intertidal flats created through the use of dredged sediment; concentrates on flats created on the western side of Sheep Island near Jonesport, Maine and nearby Beals Island; looks at the growth in shellfish and bait-worm populations on the man-made flats in comparison to population on natural intertidal flats on the same islands
A conceptual framework for the evaluation of coastal habitats by Gary L Ray( Book )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Construction and maintenance work in coastal areas can result in damage to estuarine and marine habitats. Mitigation for these impacts often involves the construction of an out-of-kind habitat or the sacrifice of a different type of habitat. At the present time, there are no effective methods for comparing the ecological importance of different types of coastal habitats or the cumulative impact of changes in the abundance and proportions of different habitats on coastal ecosystems. This report describes a conceptual framework for making ecologically based comparisons of coastal habitats. The framework is an inventory and accounting procedure in which the contribution of each habitat is estimated from measures of habitat area and habitat functional attributes. This document represents a discussion of the framework and how it might realistically be applied. Costal ecology, Costal habitat, Habitat evaluation
Assessment of habitat/resource evaluation methods for use in comparing estuarine and coastal habitats by Mark LaSalle( Book )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sedimentation : potential biological effects of dredging operations in estuarine and marine environments( )

5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

During the process of dredging, sediments are excavated and relocated. At various points in the process some volume of sediment is injected into the water column, either at the dredging site or at the dredged material disposal site. The amounts may be relatively small (e.g., around operating hydraulic cutterheads) or substantial (e.g., unconfined open-water disposal). The fate of these resuspended sediments, even if uncontaminated, is source of concern. Potential detrimental effects generally fall into two categories: water column effects (i.e. exposure to suspended sediments) and sedimentation effects. Potential impacts of suspended sediments on aquatic organisms have previously been reviewed (e.g., Newcombe and Jensen 1996; Wilber and Clarke 2001); however, only recently has the subject of sedimentation in the context of dredging effects received effects of sedimentation focuses on freshwater streams rather than coastal water bodies. This technical note summarizes the current scientific literature with emphasis on effects of uncontaminated, bedded sediments on estuarine and marine organisms. This review consolidates existing information on sedimentation effects, identifies aspects of natural and anthropogenic sedimentation processes that may be problematic, and identifies gaps in the current state of knowledge necessary for prudent dredging project management and resource protection
Invasive Marine and Estuarine Animals of Hawaii and Other Pacific Islands( )

4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

PURPOSE: Nonnative species of estuarine and marine animals are inadvertently or intentionally introduced into the waters of the United States every year (Figure 1). Variously referred to as introduced, nonindigenous (NIS), alien, nonnative, or exotic species, most pose little or no threat; however, a few have the potential to disrupt local ecosystems, fisheries, and human infrastructure. Such invasions can directly impact the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) through its responsibilities for construction and maintenance of harbors, ports and waterways, erosion control, management of water resources, and wetland and coastal habitat restoration. The general biology and ecology of invasive estuarine and marine animals have been described in previous works (Carlton 2001, Ray 2005). This report is part of a series describing known invasive estuarine and marine animals in the major geographic regions of the United States. Invasive animals of Hawaii and other Pacific islands are described and examples of species posing a specific threat to USACE activities are identified
Thin layer placement of dredged material on coastal wetlands : a review of the technical and scientific literature by Gary L Ray( )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Coastal wetlands in many areas are deteriorating due, in part, to sediment depletion, subsidence, and sea level rise. The purpose of this technical note is to review and synthesize the available scientific and technical literature concerning thin layer placement of dredged materials in wetlands to ameliorate these effects
Invasive animal species in marine and estuarine environments : biology and ecology by Gary L Ray( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A simplified and rapid method for assessing the biological disturbances resulting from stormwater and marina discharges in estuaries by Robert J Livingston( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Habitat Equivalency Analysis : a potential tool for estimating environmental benefits by Gary L Ray( )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Estimates of the environmental benefits associated with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) activities are increasingly becoming part of project requirements. This technical note describes Habitat Equivalency Analysis (HEA), a procedure that could potentially be applied to a wide variety of USACE projects to assist in calculating such benefits
Application of Long Distance Conveyance (LDC) of dredged sediments to Louisiana Coastal Restoration by Timothy L Welp( Book )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Restoration of Louisiana's marshes and other coastal habitats will, in many cases, require dredged sediments to provide suitable substrate. Potential restoration sites are often at great distances from the sediment source. It will require special efforts, commonly referred to as long distance conveyance (LDC), to pump sediment to the sites. For the purposes of this report, LDC projects are defined as those Louisiana coastal restoration projects that involve hydraulic transport of slurry (mixture of sediment and water) through pipeline distances of 16 km (10 miles) or greater. Pumping slurry through a long pipeline is a mature technology for bulk transport that has been used efficiently in specific applications like coal and iron ore transport. At the workshop entitled "Long-Distance Pipeline Transport of Dredged Material to Restore Coastal Wetlands of Louisiana," the consensus of panelists and the audience (that consisted of national and international experts in the field of long-distance transport of dredged sediment and other materials by pipeline) was that there were no fundamental technological challenges to the delivery of sediment via LDC (Hales et al. 2003). The engineering challenges will be to optimize LDC design, operation, and maintenance to achieve respective strategic restoration goals in the most efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable manner possible. Technical literature was reviewed and interviews with personnel involved in LDC-related projects conducted to summarize state-of-practice LDC dredging project information. Dredging and transport methodologies in relation to LDC state-of- practice are presented, and potential environmental impacts of long distance pipeline transport across wetlands are discussed. Scientific and engineering uncertainties related to LDC optimization of dredged sediment for coastal restoration are identified
Invasive Estuarine and Marine Animals of the North Atlantic( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New species of estuarine and marine animals are inadvertently or intentionally introduced into the waters of the United States every year (Figure 1). Variously referred to as introduced, nonindigenous (NIS), alien, nonnative, or exotic species, most pose little or no threat; however, a few have the potential to disrupt local ecosystems, fisheries, and human infrastructure. Such invasions directly impact the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) through its responsibilities for construction and maintenance of harbors, ports, and waterways; erosion control; management of water resources; and wetland and coastal habitat restoration. The general biology and ecology of invasive estuarine and marine animals have been described in previous reports (e.g., Carlton (2001), Ray (2005)). This report is part of a series describing the biology and ecology of known invasive estuarine and marine animals in the major geographic regions of the United States. Invasive animals of the North Atlantic region are described and examples of species posing a specific threat to USACE activities are identified
Application of habitat equivalency analysis to USACE projects by Gary L Ray( Book )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Habitat Equivalency Analysis (HEA) is a procedure developed to scale compensation for habitat damage (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 1997) with potential application to environmental benefits analysis. In a previous technical note the basic concepts underlying HEA, its strengths and weaknesses, and example calculations were described (Ray 2008). This technical note presents details of how HEA has been applied to a variety of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects
Invasive Marine and Estuarine Animals of the South Atlantic and Puerto Rico( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New species of estuarine and marine animals are inadvertently or intentionally introduced into the waters of the United States every year. Variously referred to as introduced, non-indigenous (NIS), alien, non-native, or exotic species, most pose little or no threat; however, a few have the potential to disrupt local ecosystems, fisheries, and human infrastructure. Such invasions directly impact the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) through its responsibilities for construction and maintenance of harbors, ports, and waterways; erosion control; management of water resources; and wetland and coastal habitat restoration. The general biology and ecology of invasive estuarine and marine animals have been described in previous reports. This report is part of a series describing the biology and ecology of known invasive estuarine and marine animals in the major geographic regions of the United States. Invasive animals of the South Atlantic region, including Puerto Rico, are described and examples of species posing a specific threat to USACE activities are identified
Invasive marine and estuarine animals of the Gulf of Mexico by Gary L Ray( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Invasive marine and estuarine animals of the North Atlantic by Gary L Ray( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Invasive Marine and Estuarine Animals of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New species of estuarine and marine animals are inadvertently or intentionally introduced into the waters of the United States every year. Variously referred to an introduced, nonindigenous (NIS), alien, nonnative, or exotic species, most pose little or no threat; however, a few have the potential to disrupt local ecosystems, fisheries, and human infrastructure. Such invasions directly impact the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) through its responsibilities for construction and maintenance of harbors, ports and waterways, erosion control, management of water resources, and wetland and coastal habitat restoration. The general biology and ecology of invasive estuarine and marine animals have been described in previous works. This report is part of a series describing the biology and ecology of known invasive estuarine and marine animals in the major geographic regions of the United States. Invasive animals of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska are described and species that pose a specific threat to USACE activities are identified
Invasive Marine and Estuarine Animals of California( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New species of estuarine and marine animals are inadvertently or intentionally introduced into the waters of the United States every year. Variously referred to as introduced, nonindigenous (NIS), alien, non-native, or exotic species, most pose little or no threat; however, a few have the potential to disrupt local ecosystems, fisheries, and human infrastructure. Such invasions directly impact the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) through its responsibilities for construction and maintenance of harbors, ports, and waterways; erosion control; management of water resources; and wetland and coastal habitat restoration. The general biology and ecology of invasive estuarine and marine animals have been described in previous reports (Carlton 2001, Ray 2005). This technical note is part of a series describing known invasive estuarine and marine animals in the major geographic regions of the United States. Unlike previous works in this series, this report focuses on a single state, California. This is due to the fact that California has the largest number of known introduced estuarine and marine animals. San Francisco Bay alone has approximately 212 NIS (Cohen and Carlton 1995) and been described as the most invaded estuary in North America (Cohen and Carlton 1998). Introduced species now dominate all major benthic communities within the bay (Carlton et al. 1990, Nichols et al. 1990, Lee et al. 2003). This report identifies species posing a specific threat to USACE activities
Invasive marine and estuarine animals of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska by Gary L Ray( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Invasive Marine and Estuarine Animals of the Gulf of Mexico( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New species of estuarine and marine animals are inadvertently or intentionally introduced into the waters of the United States every year. Variously referred to as introduced, non-indigenous (NIS), alien, non-native, or exotic species, most pose little or no threat; however, a few have the potential to disrupt local ecosystems, fisheries, and human infrastructure. Such invasions directly impact the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) through its responsibilities for construction and maintenance of harbors, ports, and waterways; erosion control; management of water resources; and wetland and coastal habitat restoration. The general biology and ecology of invasive estuarine and marine animals have been described in previous reports. This report is part of a series describing the biology and ecology of known invasive estuarine and marine animals in the major geographic regions of the United States. Invasive animals of the Gulf of Mexico are described and examples of species posing a specific threat to USACE activities are identified
Invasive marine and estuarine animals of the South Atlantic and Puerto Rico by Gary L Ray( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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English (50)