WorldCat Identities

Sullivan III, C. W.

Overview
Works: 8 works in 9 publications in 1 language and 100 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Science fiction television programs 
Roles: Other, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by C. W Sullivan III
Nature and the numinous in mythopoeic fantasy literature by Chris Brawley( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book makes connections between mythopoeic fantasy--works which engage the numinous--and the critical apparatuses of ecocriticism and posthumanism. Drawing from the ideas of Rudolf Otto in The Idea of the Holy, mythopoeic fantasy is a means of subverting normative modes of perception to both encounter the numinous and to challenge the perceptions of the natural world. Beginning with S.T. Coleridge's theories of the imagination as embodied in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, the book moves on to explore standard mythopoeic fantasists such as George MacDonald, C.S. Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien
Worldviews and the American West: The Life of the Place Itself by Suzi Jones( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Worldviews and the American West : the life of the place itself by Suzi Jones( Book )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A diverse group of writers and scholars follow the lead of noted folklorist Barre Toelken and consider, from the inside, the ways in which varied cultures in the American West understand and express their relations to the world around them. As Barre Toelken puts it in The Dynamics of Folklore, ""'Worldview' refers to the manner in which a culture sees and expresses its relation to the world around it."" In Worldviews and the American West, seventeen notable authors and scholars, employing diverse approaches and styles, apply Toelken's ideas about worldview to the American West. While the contributors represent a range of voices, methods, and visions, they are integrated through their focus on the theme of worldview in one region. Worldviews and the American West includes essays by Margaret K. Brady, Hal Cannon, Nora Marks Dauenhauer and Richard Dauenhauer, James S. Griffith, Barry Lopez, Robert McCarl, Elliott Oring, Twilo Scofield, Steve Siporin, Kim Stafford, C.W. Sullivan III, Jeannie B. Thomas, George Venn, George B. Wasson, and William A. Wilson. Each of the authors in this collection attempts to get inside one or more of the worldviews of the many cultures that have come to share and interpret the American West. The result is a lively mix of styles and voices as the authors' own worldviews interact with the multiple perspectives of the diverse peoples (and, in Barry Lopez's ""The Language of Animals, "" other species) of the West. This diversity matches the geography of the region they all call home and gives varied life and meaning to its physical and cultural landscape
Wells meets Deleuze : the scientific romances reconsidered by Michael Starr( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The author examines Well's works through the poststructuralist philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. Concepts now synonymous with science fiction--such as time travel, alien invasion and transhumanism--demonstrate Wells's intrinsic relevance to the science fiction genre and contemporary thought"--
Dreams and nightmares : science and technology in myth and fiction by Mordecai Roshwald( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This book studies the treatment of science and technology from ancient myths to current works, demonstrating the importance of science to human civilization as evidenced in literature. Works studied include the Bible, Greek mythology, tales from the Middle Ages (including those about the Golem and Dr. Faustus), Gulliver's Travels, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and works by Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, George Orwell, Bertrand Russell, and Aldous Huxley, among others
The influence of Star Trek on television, film and culture by Lincoln Geraghty( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When the first season of Star Trek opened to American television viewers in 1966, the thematically insightful sci-fi story line presented audiences with the exciting vision of a bold voyage into the final frontiers of space and strange, new galactic worlds. Perpetuating this enchanting vision, the story has become one of the longest running and most multifaceted franchises in television history. Moreover, it has presented an inspiring message for the future, addressing everything from social, political, philosophical, and ethical issues to progressive and humanist representations of race, gender, and class. This book contends that Star Trek is not just a set of television series, but has become a pervasive part of the identity of the millions of people who watch, read and consume the films, television episodes, network specials, novelizations, and fan stories. Examining Star Trek from various critical angles, the essays in this collection provide vital new insights into the myriad ways that the franchise has affected the culture it represents, the people who watch the series, and the industry that created it
J by Deke Parsons( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The birth of modern fantasy in 1930s Britain and America saw the development of new literary and film genres. J.R.R. Tolkien created modern fantasy with The Lord of the Rings, set in a fictional world based upon his life in the early 20th century British Empire, and his love of language and medieval literature. In small-town Texas, Robert E. Howard pounded out his own fantasy realm in his Conan stories, published serially in the ephemeral pulp magazines he loved. Jerry Siegel created Superman with Joe Shuster, and laid the foundation for perhaps the post far-reaching fantasy worlds: the univer
The Past That Might Have Been, the Future That May Come : Women Writing Fantastic Fiction, 1960s to the Present by Lauren J Lacey( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book explores how contemporary fantastic fiction by women writers responds to the past and imagines the future. The first two chapters look at revisionist rewritings of fairy tales and historical texts; the third and fourth focus on future-oriented narratives including dystopias and space fiction. Writers considered include Margaret Atwood, Octavia E. Butler, Angela Carter, Ursula K. Le Guin, Doris Lessing, and Jeanette Winterson, among others. The author argues that an analysis of how past and future are understood in women's fantastic fictions brings to light an "ethics of becoming" in the texts--a way of interrupting, revising and remaking problematic power structures that are tied to identity markers like class, gender and race. The book reveals how fantastic fiction can be read as narratives of disruption that enable the creation of an ethics of becoming
 
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Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.10 for Worldviews ... to 1.00 for J ...)

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