WorldCat Identities

The New York Times

Overview
Works: 302 works in 307 publications in 1 language and 7,065 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: JK1968, 327.73
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by The New York Times
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Pre-Election Tracking Poll : November 2-4, 1988( )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this survey respondents were asked their opinions of the Democratic and Republican presidential and vice-presidential candidates, and how likely they were to vote in the 1988 presidential election. They also were asked how they would vote if the election were held the day of the survey, if their minds were made up, and how strongly they favored the candidates they chose. Other information elicited included respondents' choice if they were only voting for president or for vice-president, if they were better off now than they were eight years ago, if they approved of the way Reagan was handling his job as president, previous voting behavior, who they thought would win the election, and whether they thought so because of opinions expressed in the media, by polls, by people they know and trust, or because of what the candidates themselves said. In addition, respondents were asked about their previous voting behavior, how they felt about ''liberal'' public figures, whether they liked the presidential candidates as persons, and what they thought about the national economy. Background information on individuals includes party affiliation, age, marital status, income, religious preference, employment status, education, race, and union membership ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09153.xml
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES General Election Exit Poll : Regional Files, 1988( )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This survey is part of an ongoing data collection effort by CBS News and The New York Times. Interviews were conducted with voters as they left the polls on election day, November 8, 1988. Respondents were asked about their vote choices in the presidential, senate, and gubernatorial races, the issues and factors that most influenced those votes, and whether they felt George Bush and Michael Dukakis spent more time explaining their stands on the issues or attacking each other. Other items included respondents' opinions on the condition of the United States economy, their presidential vote choice in 1984, when they made their presidential choice in the current election, and the strength of that choice. Demographic information collected includes sex, race, age, employment status, religion, education, political party identification, and family income
Voter Research and Surveys/CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES General Election Exit Poll : National File, 1990 by Voter Research and Surveys( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For this data collection, interviews were conducted with voters in 42 states as they left their polling places on election day, November 6, 1990. Respondents were asked a series of questions about their vote choices in the senate, congressional, and gubernatorial races (as appropriate to their state), and the issues and factors that most influenced those votes. Additional topics covered include the sending of United States troops to the Persian Gulf, limits on the number of years a member of Congress can serve, the plan to reduce the federal budget deficit, approval ratings for George Bush and Congress, 1988 presidential vote, federal defense spending, the death penalty, the savings and loan crisis, the drug problem, and abortion. Demographic information collected includes sex, race, age, religion, education, political party identification, and family income
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #1, January 1994 by CBS News( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Topics included the state of the United States economy, economic aid to Russia, and immigration. Respondents were also asked historical questions on World War II and the Holocaust, including who the supreme allied commander was, which nations the United States fought against, and the use of the first atomic bomb. In addition, respondents were asked to give their predictions on the future of the Russian government and economy and to supply their opinions of Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Boris Yeltsin, and Vladimir Zhirinovsky. Background information on respondents includes voter registration status, household composition, vote choice in the 1992 presidential election, political party, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, religious preference, and family income
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #2, November 1997 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll, fielded November 23-24, 1997, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on President Bill Clinton's and Secretary of State Madeline Albright's handling of U.S. foreign policy, specifically the situation with Iraq. Those queried were asked specifically about the role of the United States and the United Nations in the continuing sanctions imposed on Iraq. Respondents were also questioned about El Nino, environmental protection policies, global warming, and greenhouse gases. Additional items probed for parents' opinions on their teenagers' honesty, sexual experiences, and participation in high school pranks. Background information on respondents includes age, race, sex, age of children in household, political party, political orientation, education, and family income
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, January 1988 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluates the Reagan presidency and solicits opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Topics covered include the national economy, nuclear arms treaties between the United States and the Soviet Union, spending on space exploration, the shuttle program, federal spending on the military and defense programs, aid to the contras in Nicaragua, and whether certain aspects of a politician's personal life such as a serious medical condition or cheating on income taxes should be public knowledge. In addition, respondents were queried about their views on the candidates for the 1988 presidential election. Respondents were asked whether they had a favorable or unfavorable opinion of the various candidates, whom their party should nominate for president, whether the Republicans or the Democrats had a better group of candidates, and which candidate cared most about the needs of people like the respondent. Respondents who supported Gary Hart for the Democratic presidential nomination were telephoned again and asked an additional series of questions to determine whether disclosures by the media regarding improprieties in Hart's financing of his 1984 presidential campaign had changed their minds at all. Background information on individuals includes party affiliation, age, marital status, income, sex, religious preference, education, and race ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09098
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #3, August 1996 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll, fielded August 16-18, 1996, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President Bill Clinton and his handling of the presidency, the military, the economy, and foreign policy. In addition, opinions were solicited regarding Vice President Al Gore, Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole and his running mate Jack Kemp, Reform Party candidate Ross Perot, First Lady Hillary Clinton, retired general Colin Powell, American Red Cross president Elizabeth Dole, Georgia Congressman Newt Gingrich, Missouri Congressman Richard Gephardt, and former Colorado governor Richard Lamm. Those queried were also asked for their views toward the upcoming 1996 presidential and congressional elections, and the commitment of the Democratic and Republican parties to the creation of a strong economy, a fair tax system, the achievement of the ''American dream'', welfare and Medicare reform, eliminating the budget deficit, and gender-specific needs. Respondents were also asked for their opinions on abortion, Whitewater, the Ronald Reagan presidency, and the political conventions. Comparisons between Clinton and Dole's potential handling of international crises, ability to cut taxes, and ability to keep their word, as well as their honesty, integrity, and military history, were sought. Background information on respondents includes age, race, sex, education, religion, marital status, voter registration and participation history, political party, political orientation, United States armed forces service, family income, age of children in household, and tendency to watch late-night comedians ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02358
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #3, August 1992 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Questions were posed regarding respondents' vote intentions for the 1992 presidential election, their opinions of the 1992 presidential candidates, and the likelihood of their voting in the 1992 presidential election. Respondents were asked their opinions of various people, including Hillary Clinton, Al Gore, Barbara Bush, Dan Quayle, and Ross Perot. Additional questions pertained to the 1992 presidential campaign, the respondent's vote intention for the 1992 United States House of Representatives election, and issues surrounding homosexuality. Background information on respondents includes sex, race, age, education, religious preference, family income, political orientation, party preference, and 1988 presidential vote choice
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, April 1989 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluates the Reagan presidency and solicits opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Survey respondents were asked a series of detailed questions on abortion covering topics such as legalization, abortion as a method of birth control, the possible outcome of several Supreme Court decisions, abortion as murder, and the main reasons women have abortions. Respondents also were asked a series of questions on gambling including such topics as state lotteries, legalized gambling, organized crime, gambling in professional baseball, and the respondent's winnings and losses from gambling. In addition, respondents were asked if they approved of Bush's handling of foreign policy and the economy, if Bush had a clear idea of what he wanted to do as president, and which problems Bush should make an all-out effort to solve first, e.g., AIDS, the drug problem, the budget deficit, hunger, and illegal immigration. Background information on individuals includes party affiliation, age, marital status, income, sex, religious preference, education, and race ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09234
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Clarence Thomas Nomination Poll, September-October 1991 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection consists of a series of surveys focused primarily on issues related to the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court, both before and after charges of sexual harassment were brought against Thomas by former aide Anita Hill. The September 3-5 Poll included queries regarding the respondent's opinion of Clarence Thomas, such as whether the Senate should vote to confirm Thomas, whether the Supreme Court would become more liberal or conservative if Thomas's appointment was confirmed by the Senate, and whether Bush nominated Thomas because he is Black. Additional questions included whether Thomas's decisions as a Supreme Court justice would be impacted because he is Black, whether Thomas was ''turning his back on his own people'' by not taking a liberal position on affirmative action, and whether his opposition to most forms of affirmative action made respondents feel more or less favorable toward him. Questions concerning the confirmation of Supreme Court nominees included whether the Senate should consider how a nominee might vote on major issues, whether a nominee's personal history and character should be considered, and whether endorsements by groups such as the NAACP or the U.S. Chamber of Commerce should be considered. Other topics covered in the September 3-5 Poll included the Bush presidency, job discrimination against Blacks and women, welfare, and abortion. The October 9 Panel Survey focused on issues relative to the charges of sexual harassment brought against Clarence Thomas by Anita Hill, including whether the respondent thought the charges were true, whether the Senate treated the charges as seriously as they should have when the charges were first made, if the presence of more women in the Senate would have caused the Senate to consider the charges more seriously, whether Thomas should be confirmed if ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09781
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Election Day Surveys, 1986 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This survey is part of an ongoing data collection effort by CBS News and The New York Times. Interviews were conducted with respondents in 23 states as they left their polling places on election day, November 4, 1986. Respondents were asked to answer a series of questions about their vote choices in the senate and gubernatorial races. Additionally, they were asked about the issues and factors that most influenced those votes. Questions regarding how the respondent voted for the various referenda and propositions on the ballot in his or her state were asked as well. Other items included the respondent's opinion on the condition of the United States economy, who the Democrats and the Republicans should nominate for president in 1988, and the respondent's vote choice for president in 1984. Demographic information was also collected
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #2, February 1992 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to comment on what they thought was the most important problem facing the country, and to give their approval rating of George Bush with respect to his handling of the presidency, foreign policy, and the economy. Questions were posed regarding respondents' vote intentions for the 1992 presidential election, their opinions of potential 1992 presidential candidates, the likelihood of their voting in either a Republican or Democratic presidential primary or caucus, their candidate preferences for the Democratic and Republican presidential nominations, and the issues that presidential candidates should emphasize. Respondents were asked additional questions focusing on relations with Japan, the importance of military service for a presidential candidate, the economy, job discrimination, how well the candidates understood everyday normal people, the way Congress was handling its job, and factors that would raises doubts about a candidate. Those surveyed were also asked about capital gains and gasoline taxes, the presidential vision of George Bush, who among the presidential candidates would be more caring about the needs and problems of people, would be best able to construct a fair tax plan, and would be more likely to end the recession. Other questions dealt with allegations concerning Bill Clinton's manipulation of his draft status and involvement in an extramarital affair. Background information on respondents includes sex, race, age, marital status, education, religious preference, family income, political orientation, and party preference ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06074
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #1, September 2000 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll, fielded September 9-11, 2000, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President Bill Clinton, Vice President Al Gore, Connecticut senator Joseph Lieberman, Texas governor George W. Bush, and former Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney. Those queried were asked whether they intended to vote in the November 7, 2000, presidential election and for whom they would vote if the election were held that day, given a choice between Gore (Democratic Party), Bush (Republican Party), conservative commentator Pat Buchanan (Reform Party), and consumer advocate Ralph Nader (Green Party). A series of questions addressed the presidential campaigns of Gore and Bush, including which candidate could be trusted to keep his word, possessed strong leadership qualities, had the ability to deal with an international crisis, cared about the needs of people like the respondent, shared the values of the American people, would keep his campaign promises, had spent more time explaining his proposals than attacking his opposition, and had made clear what he intended to accomplish as president. Respondent views on the candidates' proposed policies were elicited, including which candidate was more likely to maintain a strong economy, reduce the cost of prescription drugs for the elderly, protect the environment, improve education, reduce taxes, make health care affordable to everyone, work toward building a missile defense system, and choose Supreme Court justices who would vote to keep abortion legal. Other questions focused on whether the expected federal budget surplus should be spent cutting taxes, paying down the national debt, or preserving programs like Medicare and Social Security. A series of questions addressed United States mili ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03123
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, January 1989 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluates the Reagan presidency and solicits opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Topics covered include a retrospective evaluation of Ronald Reagan's presidency, the death penalty, pay increases for congressional representatives, federal defense spending, crime, the national economy, ethics in government, poverty, abortion, the Palestine Liberation Organization, and important problems facing the nation such as homelessness, nuclear war, unemployment, drugs, and the problems of farmers. In addition, respondents were asked if they were optimistic or pessimistic about the Bush presidency, if Bush would ask Congress to increase taxes, and if Bush would be able to accomplish his goals of significantly improving the environment, education, and relations with the Soviet Union, reducing drug problems in the country, balancing the federal budget, and alleviating the problem of homelessness. Background information on individuals includes party affiliation, age, marital status, income, sex, religious preference, education, and race ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09229
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES/Tokyo Broadcasting System Collaborative National Surveys of the United States and Japan, 1990( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In these two surveys, American and Japanese respondents were asked similar sets of questions. Their opinions were sought on which country would be the number one economic power in the world in the next century, whether Japan or the United States tended to protect its own interests without regard to the needs of other countries, the main reason that more United States goods were not sold in Japan, whether the Japanese or American governments had made enough of an effort to correct the trade imbalance, and how respondents felt about Japanese companies buying office buildings and land in the United States. Respondents were also questioned about whether Americans and Japanese respected each other, whether the United States and Japan could depend on each other in the future, whether the number of United States troops in Japan should be increased, decreased, or kept at the same level, and whether the Cold War was over. In addition, American respondents only were asked about George Bush's handling of his job, foreign policy, the economy of the United States, feelings toward Israel and the Arab nations, and Ralph Nader's attacks on American industry. Both surveys collected demographic and socioeconomic information on respondents, including income, age, sex, and education ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09501
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #3, November 2000 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll, conducted November 2-5, 2000, is part of a continuing series of surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. The survey was conducted to assess respondents' interest in and opinions about the upcoming 2000 presidential election. Those polled were asked whether they approved of the Clinton presidency and whether they had a favorable impression of President Clinton. They were also asked if they had voted for Senator Bob Dole, President Clinton, or Ross Perot in the 1996 presidential election. Respondents were queried about the amount of attention they were paying to the 2000 presidential campaign, if they intended to vote in that election, if the 2000 presidential election were held that day, whether they would vote for Vice President Al Gore, Texas Governor George W. Bush, conservative commentator Pat Buchanan, or consumer advocate Ralph Nader, and which candidate they expected would win. Those polled were asked if they had a favorable impression of Bush and Gore and which candidate they thought was better prepared for the presidency. Respondents were asked whether Bush or Gore would be better able to deal with an international crisis, sustain the current economy, preserve Social Security, and improve education, and which of them would appoint Supreme Court justices who would vote to keep abortion legal. Additional questions included whether respondents belonged to labor unions, whether they were aware of Bush's driving under the influence (DUI) arrest in 1976, and if that arrest changed the way they would vote in the 2000 presidential election. Background information on respondents includes age, sex, political party, political orientation, voter registration and voting participation history, religion, marital status, children in household, education, race, Hispanic descent, years in community, an ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03234
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES New York City Mayoral Election Exit Poll, November 1989 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This data collection consists of responses to a survey of voters in the New York City mayoral election. Respondents were asked which mayoral candidate they voted for, how much they liked that candidate, when they decided on that candidate, which issues and factors most affected their vote, if TV ads influenced their vote, how reports of David Dinkins' personal financial affairs affected their vote, if campaign activities of various governmental leaders affected their vote, if race was a factor in voting, and if they had been recently contacted about voting. Respondents also evaluated Ed Koch's job performance, indicated if they would have voted for Koch had he been on the ballot, expressed opinions of each candidate, and speculated on the performance of David Dinkins and Rudolph Giuliani should one of them be elected. Other items include the city budget deficit, respondent's vote in the 1989 Democratic mayoral primary and in elections involving municipal offices and ballot proposals, and optimism/pessimism regarding the future of the city. Demographic information includes sex, race, age, party preference, political orientation, education, family income, ethnicity, and union membership ... Cf.: http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/09493.xml
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES/Tokyo Broadcasting System Japan Poll and Call-Back, June 1993 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This survey, in addition to assessing the Clinton presidency, focused on opinions related to Japan. Respondents were asked about Bill Clinton's handling of the presidency, foreign policy, and the economy. They were also asked about Clinton's economic plan and about his political orientation, leadership qualities, ability to deal with an international crisis, and concern for the needs and problems of people. Additional questions concerned the fairness of a gasoline tax to reduce the federal budget deficit, and whether the government works better when the president and the majority of Congress both belong to the same political party. Concerning Japan, respondents were asked to identify the country that would become the United States' most important economic and diplomatic partner in the next century, to describe present and future relations between Japan and the United States, to indicate their feelings toward Japan, to consider whether Japan would be the number one economic power in the world in the next century, and to describe the current condition of the Japanese economy. Respondents were asked whether Japanese companies were competing unfairly with American companies, whether the United States, Japan, or Germany made products and cars of higher quality, whether Japan was more advanced in high technology, and whether Japan would achieve a higher level of technology in manufacturing than the United States in the next century. Further questions concerning Japan dealt with trade, protectionism, the dispute with Russia over four islands captured by Russia during World War II, participation in international peace-keeping operations, and the provision of military and financial assistance in response to requests by allies. Additional topics included the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Bosnia, Somalia, and immigration. The call-back p ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06206
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #3, October 1992 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were queried regarding their vote intentions for the 1992 presidential election, their opinions of the 1992 presidential candidates and their running mates, and the likelihood of their voting in the 1992 presidential election. Questions pertaining to the presidential candidates focused on their ability to care about the needs and problems of people and bring about the kind of change the country needs, the likelihood that they would raise taxes, whether they could be trusted to deal with all the problems a president faces, allegations brought against Bill Clinton concerning his draft status, and allegations regarding the Bush Administration's dealings with Iraq before the Persian Gulf War. The survey also dealt with topics such as the responsibilities of the federal government to industry, to the poor, and to the military, the federal budget deficit, the environment, the three presidential debates, abortion, and the national economy. In addition, respondents gave their approval ratings of George Bush with respect to his handling of the presidency, foreign affairs, and the economy, and their opinions of campaign commercials for the three presidential candidates. Background information on the respondents includes sex, age, race, education, religious preference, family income, political orientation, party preference, vote choices in the 1984 and 1988 presidential elections, and voter registration status ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06095
CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES New York State Poll, September 2000 by CBS News( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This special topic poll, fielded September 14-19, 2000, queried residents of New York State on the Senate race between First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and United States Representative Rick Lazio in 2000, and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President Bill Clinton, New York State governor George Pataki, New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani, Hillary Clinton, Lazio, Connecticut senator Joseph Lieberman, and Arizona senator John McCain. Regarding the 2000 Senate race, respondents were asked how much attention they were paying to the upcoming election, for whom they would vote, and whether that decision was firm. Regardless of how they intended to vote, respondents were asked who they thought was going to win the Senate election in November 2000. Respondents were also asked which of the two candidates cared about people like the respondent. Opinions regarding the availability of abortions, tax-funded abortions, partial-birth abortions, and how much their votes for senator would be affected by their views on abortion were also gathered from respondents. Respondents were asked whether they supported tax-funded vouchers for private and religious education, and whether the projected budget surplus should be used for tax cuts, paying down the national debt, or preserving programs such as Medicare and Social Security. The poll queried respondents on whether Hillary Clinton and Lazio had the right kind of experience and character to be a senator from New York State. Respondents were also asked whether Hillary Clinton or Lazio, if elected, would be a strong supporter of Israel and would be able to get along and work with other members of the Senate, and whether Hillary Clinton's job as senator would be affected because she had not lived in New York for many years. Items on campaign advertising covered whether the c ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03124
 
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