WorldCat Identities

Vincent, Claudia G.

Overview
Works: 3 works in 4 publications in 1 language and 203 library holdings
Genres: Life skills guides 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Claudia G Vincent
Developing Social Competence for All Students by Claudia G Vincent( )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest describes the challenges of social skills instruction and provides three strategies for improving the social competence of all students, including children with disabilities. It begins by emphasizing the importance of teaching individual social skills within the context of establishing a school-wide culture of social competence. To establish a school climate acceptable to all, schools are urged to form a team representing all members of the school community to define school-wide behavioral expectations. Expectations should address the most frequently observed problem behaviors across all school settings, be condensed into three to five short and easy to remember statements, be age appropriate, and be positively stated. The second strategy for improving social competence is to provide students with social skills lessons targeting key behaviors in specific situations. The role of the teacher in requiring appropriate classroom behavior is discussed. The third strategy for improving social competence of all children is to match the level and intensity of instruction to students' needs. Functional behavioral assessment is recommended for identifying events and conditions triggering specific behaviors and the functions maintaining the behavior. Teachers are urged to use this information in designing and implementing individual behavior support plans. (Contains 12 references.) (CR)
Developing Social Competence for All Students. Eric/sep Digest by Claudia G Vincent( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This digest describes the challenges of social skills instruction and provides three strategies for improving the social competence of all students, including children with disabilities. It begins by emphasizing the importance of teaching individual social skills within the context of establishing a school-wide culture of social competence. To establish a school climate acceptable to all, schools are urged to form a team representing all members of the school community to define school-wide behavioral expectations. Expectations should address the most frequently observed problem behaviors across all school settings, be condensed into three to five short and easy to remember statements, be age appropriate, and be positively stated. The second strategy for improving social competence is to provide students with social skills lessons targeting key behaviors in specific situations. The role of the teacher in requiring appropriate classroom behavior is discussed. The third strategy for improving social competence of all children is to match the level and intensity of instruction to students' needs. Functional behavioral assessment is recommended for identifying events and conditions triggering specific behaviors and the functions maintaining the behavior. Teachers are urged to use this information in designing and implementing individual behavior support plans. (Contains 12 references.) (Cr)
Initial Exploration of a Construct Representing Native Language and Culture (NLC) in Elementary and Middle School Instruction by Mark J. Van Ryzin( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Students from American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) backgrounds have typically experienced poor academic and behavioral outcomes. In response, the educational community has recommended that teachers integrate Native Language and Culture (NLC) into instruction to create a welcoming and culturally relevant classroom environment. However, translating this recommendation into practice has been challenging. In this study, we take the first steps toward a formal exploration of the effects of NLC on AI/AN performance by attempting to define a scientifically defensible set of variables that can measure the degree to which teachers and schools make use of NLC in instruction. We used data collected by the National Indian Education Study (NIES) in 2009 and 2011, and conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses with the Student, Teacher, and School (Administrator) Surveys. Contrary to expectations, we found that use of NLC in the classroom was a multidimensional construct: student perceptions differentiated between media-based and live contact; teacher perceptions included both preparation and teaching activities; and, administrator reports included both instructional practices and access to local resources. Implications for further research are discussed. [This article was published in: "Journal of American Indian Education," 55(1), 74-101, 2016.]
 
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Audience level: 0.46 (from 0.46 for Developing ... to 0.96 for Developing ...)

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