WorldCat Identities

Chaput, Paul

Overview
Works: 24 works in 30 publications in 2 languages and 82 library holdings
Genres: Documentary television programs  History  Nonfiction television programs  Educational television programs  Documentary films  Television series 
Roles: Narrator, Author of screenplay, Director
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Paul Chaput
Finding our talk. Parler pour survivre( Visual )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focuses on the Métis of Manitoba who are working politically and through the education system, to have Michif recognized as the official language of the Métis. Features Rita Flamand, an active teacher of Michif, and Ida Rose Allard, who wrote the first books for teaching the Michif language
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Deals with how the Naskapi Development Corporation has spearheaded the promotion of the Naskapi language, history and culture. They are currently involved with projects such as computerization of the Naskapi Lexicon and a Naskapi language translation of the Bible. Profiles administrative translator George Guanish and other Naskapi speakers
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines the Ojibway Cultural Center on Manitoulin Island, Ontario and their work to preserve the Ojibway language. Profiles Alan Corbiere, an Ojibway writer. Also examines the Nookmis Mishoomis (Grandfathers and Grandmothers) of the Mnjikaning First Nation, which has a project to teach children to read, write and talk by using nursery rhymes and songs in the Ojibway language
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Looks at how linguistic approaches are being studied and applied in various educational institutions. A section on CINSA (Canadian Indian/Native Studies Asscociation) provides a first hand look at how First Nations scholars are applying Aboriginal languages in their fields of study through research, curriculum development and its application at the community level. Also closely examines the efforts of two such scholars as they carry on the legacy of their mother, renowned Cree scholar Freda Ahenakew
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines the efforts of the Oneida of the Thames community in rural Ontario to revive their language and culture, with profiles of two local institutions. One, the Tsi Niyukwaliho:tu Learning Centre, is a total immersion school with a "hands-on, healing-first" philosophy. The other is an unlicensed radio station which focuses on the Oneida language and Native American music rather than mainstream top 40. Also profiles Oneida language teacher Mercy Doxtator
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Inspired by a period of rapid change between Blackfoot dialects, and using a collection of published interviews with elders conducted 20 years ago, the Kainai Board of Education in Standoff, Blood Reserve, Alberta, is developing its own Blackfoot language curriculum. The revival of the language among the young people has inspired them to also take part in sacred Blackfoot societies and ceremonies. Includes interviews with several teachers and administrators, and profiles author Lena Russell
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines how tradition is sustained orally and through personal contact, and the process of relating old language by way of recordings and multi-media. Garry Oker, cultural coordinator of the Doig River First Nation, has produced a series of videos which documents the past, present and future prospects of the Dane-zaa, an Athapascan hunting people of northeastern British Columbia. Robin Ridington is an anthropologist at the University of British Columbia who has spent many years living with and recording the Dane-zaa people, documenting their stories and dance songs on tape, and also writing many books about them and their culture. Oker and Ridington are collaborating on a feature-length film project based on the Dane-zaa experience
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines the importance of community involvement in maintaining and reviving culture and language. Profiles and follows the activities of New Brunswick Maliseet teachers Imelda Perley and Christine Saulis
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Examines how full language immersion prgrams at community-based schools are helping to save the dying language of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) Nation in South-central British Columbia. Profiles several Shuswap speakers including Chief Ron Ignace, his wife Marianne, an anthropologist and linguist, and their family
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Looks at how residential schools played a role in the destruction of aboriginal languages in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Focuses on three former residential school students, all of them now healers in Yellowknife. Muriel Betsina, Bertha Blondin and Norman Yakelaya are reclaiming and using aboriginal languages as a healing component when dealing with their own personal experiences and in helping others overcome the legacy of the residential schools
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chronicles the history of the Dakota in Canada and their struggles to save their Siouxan culture and language. The community of Wahpeton Dakota First Nation is also desperately trying to preserve the last remaining herds of buffalo in Saskatchewan, which is central to their plains culture and language. Includes interviews with several members of the Wahpeton community, including two historians, and profiles language teacher Bernice Waditika
Finding our talk : a journey into aboriginal languages seasons 1-3( Visual )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many Aboriginal languages have disappeared or are disappearing. Others are threatened. The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Looks at the important role that the Saskatchewan Indian Cultural Centre has played in strengthening cultural awareness and in establishing several educational institutions in Saskatchewan. Also visits the Tsi Ronteriwanonhnha language centre in Kanesatake, Quebec whose doors remain open in the face of serious funding cutbacks. Profiles the late Pauline Pelly, an outspoken advocate for treaty rights, First Nation traditions, language and culture and especially education
Finding our talk II. Parler pour survivre II = Setewawenatshén:ri( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Deals with the Gwitchin people of Old Crow, Yukon, and their efforts to save their culture and language by protecting the Porcupine Caribou Herd, which is vital to the Gwitchin way of life, from oil and gas development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Finding our talk [DVD] ; Season 1, episodes 1-5( Visual )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Season 1: disc 1. Episode 1: Language among the skywalkers (Mohawk). This is the story of Mohawk ironworkers and of new approaches to language instruction for adults and children in Kahnawake. Episode 2: Language immersion (Cree). Traces the history of the Cree Language Immersion Program in the Cree schools of Northern Quebec. Episode 3: The trees are talking (Algonguin). George and Maggie Wabanonick initiate teens to their traditional culture and language. Pop group Anishnabe gives the language new life. Episode 4: The power of words (Inuktitut). At a language conference, Elders in Puvirnituq, Quebec commit to keeping Inuktitut current. Episode 5: Words travel on air (Attikamekw/Innu). Martha Karine Awashish travels to her home community to tape interviews and legends told by elders in Attikamekw
Finding our talk( Visual )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Many Aboriginal languages have disappeared or are disappearing. Others are threatened. According to Statistics Canada only 3 of 50 of the most prominent languages are expected to survive through the next century. The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities. Fortunately there are unique individuals and organizations across this country who are aiming to beat the Stats Canada odds. Not only are they using innovative strategies to maintain the basic functions of their languages, they are finding entertaining ways to preserve their creative and cognitive spirit as well. This series of 13 half-hour programs celebrates their successes and survey the state of Aboriginal languages in different areas of the country."
Finding our talk II [DVD] ; Season 2, episodes 1-5( Visual )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Season 2: disc 4. Episode 1: A brighter future (Mohawk). Kanehsatake and Kahnawake, two Mohawk communities, provide Mohawk immersion programs. Focus is on present and past students and how a group of Kahnawake youth use video to express their ideas. Episode 2: Gentle words (Maliseet). We meet Imelda Perley, a teacher and Maliseet speaker who commits much of her time and knowledge to the people of St. Mary's Kingsclear, and Tobique NB, by starting a language program involving everyday activities. Episode 3: The spirit of stories (Ojibway). We look at the Ojibway Cultural Centre on Manitoulin Island and its work on language preservation, as well as Nookmis Mishoomis of the Mnjikaning First Nation, a unique group of women who are teaching children nursery rhymes and songs in the Ojibway language. Episode 4: Language of the North (Naskapi). We see how the Naskapi Development Corporation has spearheaded the promotion of the Naskapi language, history and culture. Projects include computerization of the Naskapi lexicon, and a Naskapi language translation of the Bible. Episode 5: Language of the Caribou people (Gwitchin). A look at the Gwitchin people of Old Crow, Yukon and their efforts to protect the Porcupine caribou herd. We see how these people have used their language to become experts in inter-governmental relations and negotiations in an attempt to protect their way of life, which is threatened by the oil and gas industries
Finding our talk( Visual )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Every fourteen days a language dies. The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities. Fortunately there are unique individuals and organizations across the country who are aiming to beat the odds. Not only are they using innovative strategies to maintain the basic functions of their languages, they are finding entertaining ways to preserve their creative and cognitive spirit as well
Finding our talk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Many Aboriginal languages have disappeared or are disappearing. Others are threatened. ... The loss of language threatens the roots of family life and social structure in most aboriginal communities. Fortunately, there are unique individuals and organizations across [Canada] who are ... using innovative strategies to maintain the basic functions of their languages [and] finding entertaining ways to preserve their creative and cognitive spirit as well. This series ... celebrates their successes and survey[s] the state of Aboriginal languages in different areas of Canada"--Container
 
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English (25)

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