WorldCat Identities

Ploeg, Jenny

Overview
Works: 18 works in 21 publications in 1 language and 97 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jenny Ploeg
A Systematic overview of the effectiveness of public health nursing interventions : an overview of adolescent suicide prevention programs( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Systematic overview of the effectiveness of public health nursing interventions : an overview of community development projects( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Where would you turn for help? : older adults' knowledge and awareness of community support services( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Community support services (CSSs) enable persons coping with health or social problems to maintain the highest possible level of social functioning and quality of life. Access to these services is challenging because of the multiplicity of small agencies providing these services and the lack of a central access point. A review of the literature revealed that most service awareness studies are marred by acquiescence bias. To address this issue, service providers developed a series of 12 vignettes to describe common situations faced by older adults for which CSSs might be appropriate. In a telephone interview, 1152 older adults were presented with a series of vignettes and asked what they would do in that situation. They were also asked about their most important sources of information about CSSs. Findings show awareness of CSSs varied by the situation described and ranged from a low of 1% to 41%. The most important sources of information about CSSs included informational and referral sources, the telephone book, doctor's offices, and through word of mouth. -- Community Support Services ; awareness ; knowledge ; acquiencence bias ; vignette methodology
A systematic overview of adolescent suicide prevention programs by Jenny Ploeg( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A concept analysis of oral hygiene care in dependent older adults( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Aim To report a concept analysis of oral hygiene care. Background Oral hygiene care, as it is provided to older patients in hospital and long‐term care settings by nurses and their delegates, has the potential to contribute to the oral health of patients while preventing aspiration pneumonia as well as periodontitis, which itself has been associated with several systemic diseases. However, the state of oral cleanliness in such patients tends to be poor and despite the existence of guidelines, nursing care practices may be inadequate and not reflective of recent advances in knowledge. Design Concept analysis. Data sources A search of electronic databases (2002–2012), use of internet search engines, and hand searching yielded an international data set of 66 research studies, reviews, and practice guidelines. Review methods The concept analysis method of Walker and Avant was used to explore the concept of oral hygiene care in the context of frail older patients. Results Oral hygiene care involves approaches informed by knowing the patient, inspecting the oral cavity, removing plaque, cleansing the oral tissues, decontaminating the oral cavity, using fluoride products and maintaining oral tissue moisture. Those attributes, along with their antecedents and consequences, form a conceptual framework from which a middle‐range theory of nurse‐administered oral hygiene care is derived that could be tested, evaluated, modified, and translated into practice. Conclusions Clarity around the concept of oral hygiene care as a nursing intervention could enable nurses to impact oral health outcomes and possibly prevent systemic diseases in older patients
Integrative review: an evaluation of the methods used to explore the relationship between overtime and patient outcomes( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Aims To analyse, critically, methods employed to explore the relationship between nursing overtime and patient outcomes to strengthen future research. Background Nursing overtime hours have been increasing in the Western world since the 1980's; however, research detailing its implications for patient outcomes has not kept pace. Studies exploring the relationship between nursing overtime and patient outcomes have produced conflicting results and are deficient in number and rigour. Design Whittemore and Knafl's revised framework for integrative reviews guided the analysis. Data sources A comprehensive multi‐step search (1980–2012) of literature related to nursing overtime and patient outcomes in the CINAHL, Medline, PubMED, EMBASE and PsychInfo databases was performed. Reference lists and Google searches were completed for additional sources. Nine research papers met the inclusion criteria. Review methods All nine articles were included in the review. A systematic, iterative approach was used to extract and reduce the data to draw conclusions. Results There appears to be a positive relationship between nursing overtime and patient outcomes, however, eight of the nine studies revealed limitations in: (1) the definition and measurement of overtime; (2) data aggregation (organizationally and temporally) and (3) recognition or control of potential confounding variables. Conclusion The quality in this research sample limits the ability of this body of work to be the basis of staffing policies. Future researchers need to be explicit in detailing their methods alongside a renewed commitment from administration to develop a tracking system of important parameters at the individual and bedside level
Women and technology in health care : an invitational workshop proceedings( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Older adults' awareness of community health and support services for dementia care by Jenny Ploeg( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Older adults' awareness of community health and support services for dementia care( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The article examines where older adults seek help in caring for a parent with dementia and the factors associated with their identification of community health and support services as sources of assistance. The authors conducted telephone interviews, using random digit dialing, of 1,152 adults aged 50 and over in the city of Hamilton. Respondents received a vignette that raised issues related to parental dementia. In identifying support sources, over 37 per cent of respondents identified their physician, 33 per cent identified informal support such as family and neighbors, and 31 per cent identified home health services. Only 18 per cent identified community support services. Female participants having higher levels of education were more likely to identify their physician as a source of support. Knowing where to find information about community support services was associated with an increased likelihood of mentioning physicians and home health services as sources of assistance. -- Community support services ; awareness ; dementia ; caregivers ; vignette methodology
Where would you turn for help? : older adults' awareness of community health and support services for dementia care( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Previous findings on older adults' awareness of community support services (CSSs) have been inconsistent and marred by acquiescence or over-claiming bias. To address this issue, this study used a series of 12 vignettes to describe common situations faced by older adults for which CSSs might be appropriate. In telephone interviews, 1,152 adults aged 50 years and over were read a series of vignettes and asked if they were able to identify a community organization or agency that they may turn to in that situation. They were also asked about their most important sources of information about CSSs. The findings show that, using a vignette methodology, awareness of CSSs is much lower than previously thought. The most important sources of information about CSSs included information and referral sources, the telephone book, doctors' offices, and word of mouth. -- Aging ; community support services ; awareness ; knowledge ; acquiescence bias ; vignette methodology
A concept analysis of nursing overtime( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Aim To report a concept analysis of nursing overtime. Background Economic constraints have resulted in hospital restructuring with the aim of reducing costs. These processes often target nurse staffing (the largest organizational expense) by increasing usage of alternative staffing strategies including overtime hours. Overtime is a multifaceted, poorly defined, and indiscriminately used concept. Analysis of nursing overtime is an important step towards development and propagation of appropriate staffing strategies and rigorous research. Design Concept analysis. Data sources The search of electronic literature included indexes, grey literature, dictionaries, policy statements, contracts, glossaries and ancestry searching. Sources included were published between 1993–2012; dates were chosen in relation to increases in overtime hours used as a result of the healthcare structuring in the early 1990s. Approximately 65 documents met the inclusion criteria. Review methods Walker and Avant's methodology guided the analysis. Discussion Nursing overtime can be defined by four attributes: perception of choice or control over overtime hours worked; rewards or lack thereof; time off duty counts equally as much as time on duty; and disruption due to a lack of preparation. Antecedents of overtime arise from societal, organizational, and individual levels. The consequences of nursing overtime can be positive and negative, affecting organizations, nurses, and the patients they care for. Conclusion This concept analysis clarifies the intricacies surrounding nursing overtime with recommendations to advance nursing research, practice, and policies. A nursing‐specific middle‐range theory was proposed to guide the understanding and study of nursing overtime
Outcomes related to effective nurse supervision in long‐term care homes: an integrative review( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Aim: The aim of this integrative review was to describe the organisational, unregulated nurse, and resident outcomes associated with effective supervisory performance of regulated nurses (registered nurses or registered practical nurses) in long‐term care homes. Background: While there are data on the influence of regulated nurse staffing levels on resident outcomes, the influence of effective supervisory performance of regulated nurses on resident and organisational outcomes, nursing assistant outcomes have yet to be comprehensively explored. Evaluation: A search of six databases was made for articles dating from 2000 to 2015. Twenty‐four articles were selected and an integrative review was performed. Results: Effective nurse supervision had statistically significant positive associations ( P  < 0.05, P  < 0.000) with six different organisational, unregulated nurse and resident outcomes: nurse assistant job satisfaction, turnover/intention to leave, effectiveness, decision making, job stress and consumer satisfaction. Qualitative analyses corroborate these findings. Conclusions: There appear to be some associations between effective supervisory performance of regulated nurses with positive organisational, unregulated nursing and resident outcomes. Implications for nursing management: Nursing managers and leaders in long‐term care may promote improvements in effective nurse supervision performance as a way of reducing turnover and improving resident outcomes
Older adults' awareness of community health and support services for dementia care by Jenny Ploeg( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The article examines where older adults seek help in caring for a parent with dementia and the factors associated with their identification of community health and support services as sources of assistance. The authors conducted telephone interviews, using random digit dialing, of 1,152 adults aged 50 and over in the city of Hamilton. Respondents received a vignette that raised issues related to parental dementia. In identifying support sources, over 37 per cent of respondents identified their physician, 33 per cent identified informal support such as family and neighbors, and 31 per cent identified home health services. Only 18 per cent identified community support services. Female participants having higher levels of education were more likely to identify their physician as a source of support. Knowing where to find information about community support services was associated with an increased likelihood of mentioning physicians and home health services as sources of assistance
Models of partnership within family‐centred care in the acute paediatric setting: a discussion paper( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Aims: A discussion of partnership in the context of family‐centred care in the acute paediatric setting, through a critical analysis of partnership models. Background: Paediatric healthcare practitioners understand the importance of family‐centred care, but struggle with how to translate the core tenets into action and are confused by several rival terms. Partnering relationships are included in definitions of family‐centred care, yet less is known about strategies to fully engage or support parents in these partnerships. A rigorous examination of concepts embedded in family‐centred care such as partnership may provide a better understanding of how to implement the broader concept and support exemplary care in today's clinical practice environment. Design: Discussion paper. Data sources: Electronic search (January 2000 ‐ December 2014) performed on CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts and PsychINFO using keywords partnership, family‐centred care and conceptual framework . Eligible references were drawn from the databases, reference lists and expert sources. Eight models met inclusion criteria and had currency and relevance to the acute paediatric setting. Implications for nursing: Nurses should continue exploring partnership in various paediatric contexts given the wide‐ranging definitions, lack of operational indicators and need for stronger relational statements in current models. An examination of key strategies, barriers and facilitators of partnership is recommended. Conclusion: One partnership model had both high overall maturity and best fit with family‐centred care principles. All models originate from Western and developed countries, indicating that future partnership models should be more geographically, culturally and economically diverse
An integrative review of the factors influencing new graduate nurse engagement in interprofessional collaboration( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Aim To analyse critically the barriers and facilitators to new graduate nurse engagement in interprofessional collaboration. Background The acculturation of new graduate nurses must be considered in strategies that address the global nursing shortage. Interprofessional collaboration may support the transition and retention of new graduate nurses. Design Whittemore and Knafl's revised framework for integrative reviews guided the analysis. Data sources A comprehensive multi‐step search (published 2000–2012) of the North American interprofessional collaboration and new graduate literature indexed in the CINAHL, Proquest, Pubmed, PsychINFO and Cochrane databases was performed. A sample of 26 research and non‐research reports met the inclusion criteria. Review methods All 26 articles were included in the review. A systematic and iterative approach was used to extract and reduce the data to draw conclusions. Results The analysis revealed several barriers and facilitators to new graduate engagement in interprofessional collaboration. These factors exist at the individual, team and organizational levels and are largely consistent with conceptual and empirical analyses of interprofessional collaboration conducted in other populations. However, knowledge and critical thinking emerged as factors not identified in previous analyses. Conclusion Despite a weak‐to‐moderate literature sample, this review suggests implications for team and organizational development, education and research that may support new graduate nurse engagement in IPC
Community care research education curriculum( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Where would you turn for help? : older adults' awareness of community support services by Margaret A Denton( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effectiveness of Preventive Primary Care Outreach Interventions with Older Persons : Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials by Jenny Ploeg( Book )

3 editions published between 2000 and 2003 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Languages
English (21)