WorldCat Identities

Waterboer, Tim

Overview
Works: 28 works in 29 publications in 2 languages and 66 library holdings
Roles: Author, Other, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Tim Waterboer
Multiplex-Serologie simultane Analyse von Antikörper-Antworten gegen humane Papillomviren (HPV) mit Protein-Arrays by Tim Waterboer( )

2 editions published in 2005 in German and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Multiplex HPV Serologie Simultane Analyse von Antikörper-Antworten gegen humane Papillomviren (HPV) mit Protein Arrays by Tim Waterboer( )

1 edition published in 2008 in German and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immunoprofiling of Chlamydia trachomatis using whole-proteome microarrays generated by on-chip in situ expression by Katrin Hufnagel( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The seroprevalence of human papillomavirus by immune status and by ethnicity in London by Delphine Casabonne( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and the prognosis of head and neck cancer in a geographical region with a low prevalence of HPV infection by Rossana Verónica Mendoza López( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sexually transmitted infections and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: results from the Nurses' Health Studies by Renée Turzanski Fortner( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Seropositivity of selected chronic infections and different measures of obesity by Dennis Freuer( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Helicobacter pylori seropositivity: prevalence, associations, and the impact on incident metabolic diseases / risk factors in the population-based KORA study by Nina Wawro( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Titers Are Not Associated with Gastric Cancer Risk in East Asia by Matthew G Varga( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The sero-epidemiology of human papillomavirus among Caucasian transplant recipients in the UK by Delphine Casabonne( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hepatitis C virus seroprevalence in the general female population of 9 countries in Europe, Asia and Africa by Gary M Clifford( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is early life exposure to polyomaviruses and herpesviruses associated with obesity indices and metabolic traits in childhood? by Marianna Karachaliou( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Geospatial analyses identify regional hot spots of diffuse gastric cancer in rural Central America by Ricardo L Dominguez( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Soy and tea intake on cervical cancer risk: the Singapore Chinese Health Study by Proma Paul( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology as a measure of cumulative infection with human papillomavirus by Hilary A Robbins( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immunogenicity and HPV infection after one, two, and three doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine in girls in India: a multicentre prospective cohort study( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: An increase in worldwide HPV vaccination could be facilitated if fewer than three doses of vaccine are as effective as three doses. We originally aimed to compare the immunogenicity and frequency of persistent infection and cervical precancerous lesions caused by vaccine-targeted HPV after vaccination with two doses of quadrivalent vaccine on days 1 and 180 or later, with three doses on days 1, 60, and 180 or later, in a cluster-randomised trial. Suspension of the recruitment and vaccination due to events unrelated to our study meant that some enrolled girls could not be vaccinated and some vaccinated girls received fewer than the planned number of vaccinations by default. As a result, we re-analysed our data as an observational cohort study. Methods: Our study was designed to be done in nine locations (188 clusters) in India. Participants were unmarried girls aged 10-18 years vaccinated in four cohorts: girls who received three doses of vaccine on days 1, 60, and 180 or later, two doses on days 1 and 180 or later, two doses on days 1 and 60 by default, and one dose by default. The primary outcomes were immunogenicity in terms of L1 genotype-specific binding antibody titres, neutralising antibody titres, and antibody avidity after vaccination for the vaccine-targeted HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11 and incident and persistent infections with these HPVs. Analysis was per actual number of vaccine doses received. This study is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN98283094; and withClinicalTrials.gov, numberNCT00923702 . Findings: Vaccination of eligible girls was initiated on Sept 1, 2009, and continued until April 8, 2010. Of 21 258 eligible girls identified at 188 clusters, 17 729 girls were recruited from 178 clusters before suspension. 4348 (25%) girls received three doses, 4979 (28%) received two doses on days 1 and 180 or later, 3452 (19%) received two doses at days 1 and 60, and 4950 (28%) received one dose. Immune response in the two-dose HPV vaccine group was non-inferior to the three-dose group (median fluorescence intensity ratio for HPV 16 1·12 [95% CI 1·02-1·23] and for HPV 18 1·04 [0·92-1·19]) at 7 months, but was inferior in the two-dose default (0·33 [0·29-0·38] for HPV 16 and 0·51 [0·43-0·59] for HPV 18) and one-dose default (0·09 [0·08-0·11] for HPV 16 and 0·12 [0·10-0·14] for HPV 18) groups at 18 months. The geometric mean avidity indices after fewer than three doses by design or default were non-inferior to those after three doses of vaccine. Fewer than three doses by design and default induced detectable concentrations of neutralising antibodies to all four vaccine-targeted HPV types, but at much lower concentration after one dose. Cervical samples from 2649 participants were tested and the frequency of incident HPV 16, 18, 6, and 11 infections was similar irrespective of the number of vaccine doses received. The testing of at least two samples from 838 participants showed that there was no persistent HPV 16 or 18 infections in any study group at a median follow-up of 4·7 years (IQR 4·2-5·1). Interpretation: Despite the limitations imposed by the suspension of the HPV vaccination, our findings lend support to the WHO recommendation of two doses, at least 6 months apart, for routine vaccination of young girls. The short-term protection afforded by one dose of HPV vaccine against persistent infection with HPV 16, 18, 6, and 11 is similar to that afforded by two or three doses of vaccine and merits further assessment. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Increased Serological Response Against Human Herpesvirus 6A Is Associated With Risk for Multiple Sclerosis by Elin Engdahl( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Human herpesvirus (HHV)-6A or HHV-6B involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS) etiology has remained controversial mainly due to the lack of serological methods that can distinguish the two viruses. A novel multiplex serological assay measuring IgG reactivity against the immediate-early protein 1 from HHV-6A (IE1A) and HHV-6B (IE1B) was used in a MS cohort (8,742 persons with MS and 7,215 matched controls), and a pre-MS cohort (478 individuals and 476 matched controls) to investigate this further. The IgG response against IE1A was positively associated with MS (OR = 1.55, p = 9 × 10 -22), and increased risk of future MS (OR = 2.22, p = 2 × 10 -5). An interaction was observed between IE1A and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody responses for MS risk (attributable proportion = 0.24, p = 6 × 10 -6). In contrast, the IgG response against IE1B was negatively associated with MS (OR = 0.74, p = 6 × 10 -11). The association did not differ between MS subtypes or vary with severity of disease. The genetic control of HHV-6A/B antibody responses were located to the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region and the strongest association for IE1A was the DRB1 * 13:01-DQA1 * 01:03-DQB1 * 06:03 haplotype while the main association for IE1B was DRB1 * 13:02-DQA1 * 01:02-DQB1 * 06:04. In conclusion a role for HHV-6A in MS etiology is supported by an increased serological response against HHV-6A IE1 protein, an interaction with EBV, and an association to HLA genes
Helicobacter pylori serological biomarkers of gastric cancer risk in the MCC-Spain case-control Study( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Languages
English (18)

German (3)