WorldCat Identities

Greskowiak, Janek Johannes

Overview
Works: 7 works in 12 publications in 2 languages and 49 library holdings
Roles: Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Janek Johannes Greskowiak
Reactive transport processes in artificially recharged aquifers field and modelling studies by Janek Greskowiak( Book )

6 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A benchmark for multi-rate surface complexation and 1D dual-domain multi-component reactive transport of U(VI) by Janek Greskowiak( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computational material flow analysis for thousands of chemicals of emerging concern in European waters by Jos van Gils( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Long-term transport behavior of psychoactive compounds in sewage-affected groundwater by Hang Thuy Thi Nham( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hydrochemical evolution of a freshwater lens below a barrier island (Spiekeroog, Germany): The role of carbonate mineral reactions, cation exchange and redox processes( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Freshwater lenses below barrier islands are a precious resource for the local water supply and important for coastal ecosystems. The aim of this study was to investigate the hydrochemical evolution of a freshwater lens, using the barrier island Spiekeroog, Germany, as an example. For this purpose, groundwater samples were obtained during several campaigns, and hydrochemical data and 13 C/ 12 C isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon were linked to apparent groundwater ages. Results show that apparent groundwater ages increase with depth and range between 4 and 51 years. All groundwater samples were close to equilibrium with respect to calcite and considerably enriched in calcium and bicarbonate, suggesting calcite dissolution in the unsaturated zone of the dune sediments. The estimated average rate of decalcification was ∼13 mm/a, resulting in a decalcification depth of ∼4.6m for the oldest sediments of an approximate age of 350 years. Moreover, 13 C/ 12 C isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon indicated secondary carbonate mineral reactions within the aquifer, such as recrystallization and closed-system calcite dissolution. Cation exchange was primarily observed in older groundwater, i.e. the deeper part of the aquifer, and the calculated time of complete freshening of the aquifer is ∼600 years. Regarding redox reactants, dissolved oxygen and nitrate concentrations decreased rapidly in young groundwater, while dissolved manganese and iron were virtually absent in samples collected below the zones of oxygen and nitrate reduction. Dissolved sulfide species indicate sulfate reduction in older groundwater, and methanogenesis was detected locally. The absence of solute manganese and iron may be explained by the formation of minerals, such as iron sulfides, siderite, and rhodochrosite, that serve as possible sinks for redox-sensitive solutes. In conclusion, this study showed that hydrochemical data can be linked to groundwater ages to describe the hydrochemical evolution of a freshwater lens in a homogeneous sandy aquifer as a function of residence time. Highlights: The hydrochemical evolution of a freshwater lens was a function of residence time. Calcite dissolution, cation exchange, and redox reactions were the key processes. Stable carbon isotopes indicated secondary carbonate reactions within the aquifer. Decalcification rates, freshening times, and carbon oxidation rates were estimated
The uncertainty of biodegradation rate constants of emerging organic compounds in soil and groundwater - A compilation of literature values for 82 substances( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The present study reports on biodegradation rate constants of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in soil and groundwater available in the literature. The major aim of this compilation was to provide an assessment of the uncertainty of hydrological models with respect to the fate of EOCs. The literature search identified a total number of 82 EOCs for which 1st-order rate constants could be derived. It was found that for the majority of compounds degradation rate constants vary over more than three orders of magnitude. Correlation to factors that are well known to affect the degradation rate, such as temperature or redox condition was weak. No correlation at all was found with results from available quantitative structure-activity relationship models. This suggests that many unknown site specific or experimentally specific factors influence the degradation behavior of EOCs in the environment. Thus, local and catchment scale predictive models to estimate EOC concentration at receptors, e.g., receiving waters or drinking water wells, need to consider the large uncertainty in 1st-order rate constants. As a consequence, applying rate constants that were derived from one experiment or field site investigation to other experiments or field sites should be done with extreme caution. Graphical abstract: Highlights:>3 orders of magnitude uncertainty of 1st-order degradation rate constants. Correlation to redox, temperature and scale is weak for data from various sources. Rate constants cannot be transferred from one experiment/field site to another
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
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Audience level: 0.90 (from 0.88 for The uncert ... to 0.97 for Reactive t ...)

Associated Subjects
Alternative Names
Greskowiak, Janek Johannes 1972-

Languages
English (11)

German (1)