WorldCat Identities

Budts, Werner

Overview
Works: 19 works in 19 publications in 1 language and 27 library holdings
Roles: Contributor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Werner Budts
Management of acute heart failure in adult patients with congenital heart disease by Alexander Van De Bruaene( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Red Flags for Maltese Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: Poorer Dental Care and Less Sports Participation Compared to Other European Patients--An APPROACH-IS Substudy by On behalf of the APPROACH-IS consortium and the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ISACHD)( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Serial exercise testing in children, adolescents and young adults with Senning repair for transposition of the great arteries by Roselien Buys( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pulmonary Hypertension in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: Real-World Data from the International COMPERA-CHD Registry by Harald Kaemmerer( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Introduction: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), aggravating the natural, post-operative, or post-interventional course of the underlying anomaly. The various CHDs differ substantially in characteristics, functionality, and clinical outcomes among each other and compared with other diseases with pulmonary hypertension. Objective: To describe current management strategies and outcomes for adults with PH in relation to different types of CHD based on real-world data. Methods and results: COMPERA (Comparative, Prospective Registry of Newly Initiated Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension) is a prospective, international PH registry comprising, at the time of data analysis, >8200 patients with various forms of PH. Here, we analyzed a subgroup of 680 patients with PH due to CHD, who were included between 2007 and 2018 in 49 specialized centers for PH and/or CHD located in 11 European countries. At enrollment, the patients' median age was 44 years (67% female), and patients had either pre-tricuspid shunts, post-tricuspid shunts, complex CHD, congenital left heart or aortic disease, or miscellaneous other types of CHD. Upon inclusion, targeted therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) included endothelin receptor antagonists, PDE-5 inhibitors, prostacyclin analogues, and soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators. Eighty patients with Eisenmenger syndrome were treatment-naïve. While at inclusion the primary PAH treatment for the cohort was monotherapy (70% of patients), with 30% of the patients on combination therapy, after a median observation time of 45.3 months, the number of patients on combination therapy had increased significantly, to 50%. The use of oral anticoagulants or antiplatelets was dependent on the underlying diagnosis or comorbidities. In the entire COMPERA-CHD cohort, after follow-up and receiving targeted PAH therapy (n = 511), 91 patients died over the course of a 5-year follow up. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival estimate for CHD associated PH was significantly better than that for idiopathic PAH (76% vs. 54%; p < 0.001). Within the CHD associated PH group, survival estimates differed particularly depending on the underlying diagnosis and treatment status. Conclusions: In COMPERA-CHD, the overall survival of patients with CHD associated PH was dependent on the underlying diagnosis and treatment status, but was significantly better as than that for idiopathic PAH. Nevertheless, overall survival of patients with PAH due to CHD was still markedly reduced compared with survival of patients with other types of CHD, despite an increasing number of patients on PAH-targeted combination therapy
Erratum to: Visualization of the intracavitary blood flow in systemic ventricles of Fontan patients by contrast echocardiography using particle image velocimetry by Konstantinos Lampropoulos( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Early bare-metal stent thrombosis presenting with cardiogenic shock: a case report by Konstantinos M Lampropoulos( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cardiac patients show high interest in technology enabled cardiovascular rehabilitation by Roselien Buys( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Visualization of the intracavitary blood flow in systemic ventricles of Fontan patients by contrast echocardiography using particle image velocimetry by Konstantinos Lampropoulos( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Healthcare system inputs and patient-reported outcomes a study in adults with congenital heart defect from 15 countries by Liesbet Van Bulck( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: The relationship between healthcare system inputs (e.g., human resources and infrastructure) and mortality has been extensively studied. However, the association between healthcare system inputs and patient-reported outcomes remains unclear. Hence, we explored the predictive value of human resources and infrastructures of the countries' healthcare system on patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 3588 patients with congenital heart disease (median age = 31y; IQR = 16.0; 52% women; 26% simple, 49% moderate, and 25% complex defects) from 15 countries. The following patient-reported outcomes were measured: perceived physical and mental health, psychological distress, health behaviors, and quality of life. The assessed inputs of the healthcare system were: (i) human resources (i.e., density of physicians and nurses, both per 1000 people) and (ii) infrastructure (i.e., density of hospital beds per 10,000 people). Univariable, multivariable, and sensitivity analyses using general linear mixed models were conducted, adjusting for patient-specific variables and unmeasured country differences. Results: Sensitivity analyses showed that higher density of physicians was significantly associated with better self-reported physical and mental health, less psychological distress, and better quality of life. A greater number of nurses was significantly associated with better self-reported physical health, less psychological distress, and less risky health behavior. No associations between a higher density of hospital beds and patient-reported outcomes were observed. Conclusions: This explorative study suggests that density of human resources for health, measured on country level, are associated with patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease. More research needs to be conducted before firm conclusions about the relationships observed can be drawn
Past and current cause-specific mortality in Eisenmenger syndrome( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Aims Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic strategies have changed during the 2000s in conjunction with an emphasis on specialist follow-up. The aim of this study was to determine the cause-specific mortality in ES and evaluate any relevant changes between 1977 and 2015. Methods and results This is a retrospective, descriptive multicentre study. A total of 1546 patients (mean age 38.7 ± 15.4 years; 36% male) from 13 countries were included. Cause-specific mortality was examined before and after July 2006, 'early' and 'late', respectively. Over a median follow-up of 6.1 years (interquartile range 2.1-21.5 years) 558 deaths were recorded; cause-specific mortality was identified in 411 (74%) cases. Leading causes of death were heart failure (34%), infection (26%), sudden cardiac death (10%), thromboembolism (8%), haemorrhage (7%), and peri-procedural (7%). Heart failure deaths increased in the 'late' relative to the 'early' era (P = 0.032), whereas death from thromboembolic events and death in relation to cardiac and non-cardiac procedures decreased (P = 0.014, P = 0.014, P = 0.004, respectively). There was an increase in longevity in the 'late' vs. 'early' era (median survival 52.3 vs. 35.2 years, P <0.001). Conclusion The study shows that despite changes in therapy, care, and follow-up of ES in tertiary care centres, all-cause mortality including cardiac remains high. Patients from the 'late' era, however, die later and from chronic rather than acute cardiac causes, primarily heart failure, whereas peri-procedural and deaths due to haemoptysis have become less common. Lifelong vigilance in tertiary centres and further research for ES are clearly needed
Right ventricular systolic dysfunction at rest is not related to decreased exercise capacity in patients with a systemic right ventricle( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: To evaluate the relationship between right ventricular (RV) systolic dysfunction at rest and reduced exercise capacity in patients with a systemic RV (sRV). Methods: All patients with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (ccTGA) or complete TGA after atrial switch (TGA-Mustard/Senning) followed in our institution between July 2011 and September 2017 who underwent cardiac imaging within a six-month time period of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) were analyzed. We assessed sRV systolic function with TAPSE and fractional area change on echocardiogram and, if possible, with ejection fraction, global longitudinal and circumferential strain on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Results: We studied 105 patients with an sRV (median age 34 [IQR 28-42] years, 29% ccTGA and 71% TGA-Mustard/Senning) of which 39% had either a pacemaker (n=17), Eisenmenger physiology (n=6), severe systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation (n=14), or peak exercise arterial oxygen saturation<92% (n=17). Most patients were asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic (NYHA class I/II/III in 71/23/6%). Sixty-four percent had evidence of moderate or severe sRV dysfunction on cardiac imaging. Mean peak oxygen uptake (pVO2) was 24.1±7.4mL/kg/min, corresponding to a percentage of predicted pVO2 (%ppVO2) of 69±17%. No parameter of sRV systolic function as evaluated on echocardiography (n=105) or CMR (n=46) was correlated with the %ppVO2, even after adjusting for associated cardiac defects or pacemakers. Conclusions: In adults with an sRV, there is no relation between echocardiographic or CMR-derived sRV systolic function parameters at rest and peak oxygen uptake. Exercise imaging may be superior to evaluate whether sRV contractility limits exercise capacity. Highlights: Systemic right ventricular (sRV) dysfunction is common in paucisymptomatic adults with TGA after atrial switch or ccTGA. There seems to be no association between resting parameters of sRV systolic function and peak oxygen uptake. Regular follow-up should include exercise testing, even in paucisymptomatic adults with an sRV
Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease Following Hospitalization (from APPROACH-IS) by Philip Moons( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this international study, we (1) compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) who had versus had not been hospitalized during the previous 12 month, (2) contrasted PROs in patients who had been hospitalized for cardiac surgery versus nonsurgical reasons, (3) assessed the magnitude of differences between the groups (i.e., effect sizes), and (4) explored differential effect sizes between countries. APPROACH-IS was a cross-sectional, observational study that enrolled 4,028 patients from 15 countries (median age 32 years; 53% females). Self-report questionnaires were administered to measure PROs: health status; anxiety and depression; and quality of life. Overall, 668 patients (17%) had been hospitalized in the previous 12 months. These patients reported poorer outcomes on all PROs, with the exception of anxiety. Patients who underwent cardiac surgery demonstrated a better quality of life compared with those who were hospitalized for nonsurgical reasons. For significant differences, the effect sizes were small, whereas they were negligible in nonsignificant comparisons. Substantial intercountry differences were observed. For various PROs, moderate to large effect sizes were found comparing different countries. In conclusion, adults with CHD who had undergone hospitalization in the previous year had poorer PROs than those who were medically stable. Researchers ought to account for the timing of recruitment when conducting PRO research as hospitalization can impact results
Geographical variation and predictors of physical activity level in adults with congenital heart disease by Lena Larsson( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Physical activity is important to maintain and promote health. This is of particular interest in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) where acquired heart disease should be prevented. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a minimum of 2.5 h/week of physical activity exceeding 3 metabolic equivalents(METS) to achieve positive health effects. It is unknown whether physical activity levels (PAL) in adult CHD patients differ by country of origin. Methods: 3896 adults with CHD recruited from 15 countries over 5 continents completed self-reported instruments, including the Health Behaviour Scale (HBS-CHD), within the APPROACH-IS project. For each patient, we calculated whether WHO recommendations were achieved or not. Associated factors were investigated using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. Results: On average, 31% reached the WHO recommendations but with a great variation between geographical areas (India: 10%-Norway: 53%). Predictors for physical activity level in line with the WHO recommendations, with country of residence as random effect, were male sex (OR 1.78, 95%CI 1.52-2.08), NYHA-class I (OR 3.10, 95%CI 1.71-5.62) and less complex disease (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.16-1.83). In contrast, older age (OR 0.97, 95%CI 0.96-0.98), lower educational level (OR 0.41, 95%CI 0.26-0.64) and being unemployed (OR 0.57, 95%CI 0.42-0.77) were negatively associated with reaching WHO recommendations. Conclusions: A significant proportion of patients with CHD did not reach the WHO physical activity recommendations. There was a large variation in physical activity level by country of origin. Based on identified predictors, vulnerable patients may be identified and offered specific behavioral interventions
Sense of coherence in adults with congenital heart disease in 15 countries Patient characteristics, cultural dimensions and quality of life by Philip Moons( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Previous studies have found that sense of coherence (SOC) is positively related to quality of life (QoL) in persons with chronic conditions. In congenital heart disease (CHD), the evidence is scant. Aims: We investigated (i) intercountry variation in SOC in a large international sample of adults with CHD; (ii) the relationship between demographic and clinical characteristics and SOC; (iii) the relationship between cultural dimensions of countries and SOC; and (iv) variation in relative importance of SOC in explaining QoL across the countries. Methods: APPROACH-IS was a cross-sectional, observational study, with 4028 patients from 15 countries enrolled. SOC was measured using the 13-item SOC scale (range 13â91) and QoL was assessed by a linear analog scale (range 0â100). Results: The mean SOC score was 65.5±13.2. Large intercountry variation was observed with the strongest SOC in Switzerland (68.8±11.1) and the lowest SOC in Japan (59.9±14.5). A lower SOC was associated with a younger age; lower educational level; with job seeking, being unemployed or disabled; unmarried, divorced or widowed; from a worse functional class; and simple CHD. Power distance index and individualism vs collectivism were cultural dimensions significantly related to SOC. SOC was positively associated with QoL in all participating countries and in the total sample, with an explained variance ranging from 5.8% in Argentina to 30.4% in Japan. Conclusion: In adults with CHD, SOC is positively associated with QoL. The implementation of SOC-enhancing interventions might improve QoL, but strategies would likely differ across countries given the substantial variation in explained variance. © The European Society of Cardiology 2020
Effect of respiration on cardiac filling at rest and during exercise in Fontan patients: A clinical and computational modeling study( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Due to the absence of a sub-pulmonary ventricle, the Fontan circulation is sensitive to respiration-induced changes in intrathoracic pressure. However, the importance of a 'respiratory pump' in creating forward flow remains controversial. We aimed at evaluating the effect of respiration on ventricular filling during exercise using clinical data and computational modeling predictions. Methods: Ten Fontan patients (6 male, 20 ± 4 years) underwent ungated cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging at rest and during supine bicycle exercise to evaluate systemic ventricular volumes (end-diastolic volume index (EDVi), end-systolic volume index (ESVi) and stroke volume index (SVi)) during normal respiration and a Valsalva maneuver. Respiratory-dependent SV was calculated. Clinical results were compared to predictions made by a closed-loop lumped-parameter (LPN) computational model of Fontan circulation. Results: Inspiration resulted in increased EDVi (98 ± 16 to 103 ± 15 mL; P = 0.001), SVi (55 ± 9 to 59 ± 9 mL; P = 0.001) and cardiac index (3.9 ± 0.7 to 4.2 ± 0.8 L/min; P = 0.002), whereas ESVi (P = 0.096) remained unchanged. The effect of inspiration on EDVi (mean effect + 6 ± 1 mL; P <0.0001) and SVi (+ 4 ± 1 mL; P <0.0001) was maintained during exercise. Respiratory-dependent SVi tended to increase during exercise (3 ± 2% to 5 ± 3%; P = 0.084). Valsalva resulted in decreased EDVi (P = 0.001), ESVi (P = 0.003) and SVi (P = 0.005). Computational modeling indicated higher EDV and SV at end-inspiration and expiration, showing a phased time delay between peak caval vein flow and peak SV. Conclusion: In Fontan patients, inspiration resulted in increased ventricular filling at rest and during exercise. Results were confirmed using a computational model indicating a phased time delay between peak SV and peak caval vein flow
Phenotypes of adults with congenital heart disease around the globe a cluster analysis by Edward Callus( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

OBJECTIVE: To derive cluster analysis-based groupings for adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) when it comes to perceived health, psychological functioning, health behaviours and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: This study was part of a larger worldwide multicentre study called APPROACH-IS; a cross sectional study which recruited 4028 patients (2013-2015) from 15 participating countries. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using Ward's method in order to group patients with similar psychological characteristics, which were defined by taking into consideration the scores of the following tests: Sense Of Coherence, Health Behavior Scale (physical exercise score), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Illness Perception Questionnaire, Satisfaction with Life Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale scores of the EQ-5D perceived health scale and a linear analogue scale (0-100) measuring QoL. RESULTS: 3768 patients with complete data were divided into 3 clusters. The first and second clusters represented 89.6% of patients in the analysis who reported a good health perception, QoL, psychological functioning and the greatest amount of exercise. Patients in the third cluster reported substantially lower scores in all PROs. This cluster was characterised by a significantly higher proportion of females, a higher average age the lowest education level, more complex forms of congenital heart disease and more medical comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that certain demographic and clinical characteristics may be linked to less favourable health perception, quality of life, psychological functioning, and health behaviours in ACHD. This information may be used to improve psychosocial screening and the timely provision of psychosocial care
Images of the Month - Large Bronchopleural Fistula After Surgical Resection: Secret to Success( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sense of Coherence in Young People with Congenital Heart Disease( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT: Objective: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have been found to play a role in the development of clinical complications. Hence, it is crucial to understand why some patients do well in terms of PROs and others do not and to identify these groups of patients. Sense of coherence (SOC), capturing a person's outlook on life, is associated with PROs in adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, we (1) examine how SOC develops in young people with CHD, (2) identify subgroups of SOC development, and (3) characterize subgroups in terms of demographic and clinical variables and PROs. Method: In this 4-wave longitudinal study, 429 adolescents with CHD (53.4% boys; median age = 16.3 years) completed assessments of SOC (SOC-13). PROs included quality of life (linear analog scale), loneliness (UCLA-8), depression (CES-D), and perceived health (PedsQL). Latent class growth analysis was used to identify clinically meaningful subgroups of SOC development. Results: Patients with CHD had a moderate SOC that slightly decreased over the first 18 months. Four subgroups of SOC development emerged: Consistently High (27%), Intermediate Stable (41%), Intermediate Decreasing (25%), and Chronically Low (7%). Subgroups differed in terms of sex and PROs, but not in terms of age, disease complexity, primary diagnosis, or surgical history. Conclusion: Patients with a strong and stable SOC over time showed a better adaptation than patients with a lower and/or decreasing SOC. Our results can guide the identification of patients at risk for adverse health outcomes and the development of interventions to enhance optimal living in patients with CHD
2016 ESC Guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation developed in collaboration with EACTS( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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