WorldCat Identities

Bratt, Ewa-Lena

Overview
Works: 11 works in 11 publications in 2 languages and 17 library holdings
Roles: Other, Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ewa-Lena Bratt
Adolescents with congenital heart disease: their opinions about the preparation for transfer to adult care by Åsa Burström( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Övergångar i hälso- och sjukvård : ett livsloppsperspektiv och organisatoriska aspekter( Book )

1 edition published in 2021 in Swedish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Livsförändringar eller övergångar i livet kan ibland innebära att en person behöver söka kontakt med eller ta hjälp av hälso- och sjukvårdens verksamheter
Assessing the level of evidence on transfer and transition in young people with chronic conditions: protocol of a scoping review by Mariela Acuña Mora( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Health care providers' attitudes towards transfer and transition in young persons with long term illness- a web-based survey by Carina Sparud-Lundin( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in asymptomatic children and adolescents psychosocial consequensces and impact on quality of life and physical activity by Ewa-Lena Bratt( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Parent's experiences of counselling and their need for support following a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease - a qualitative study in a Swedish context by Ewa-Lena Bratt( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mechanisms of impact and experiences of a person-centred transition programme for adolescents with CHD the Stepstones project by Markus Saarijärvi( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

BACKGROUND: During the past decade there has been some evaluation of transition programmes for adolescents with chronic conditions. However, this has rarely involved process evaluations focusing on mechanisms leading to outcomes, thus hampering implementation of these complex interventions. Our aim was to (I) describe adolescents' and parents' experiences of participating in a person-centred transition programme aiming to empower them in transition to adulthood and (II) explore the mechanisms of impact. METHODS: A qualitative process evaluation was performed, embedded in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a transition programme for adolescents with congenital heart disease in Sweden. A purposive sample of 14 adolescents and 12 parents randomized to the intervention group were interviewed after participation in the programme. Data were analysed deductively and inductively in NVivo v12. RESULTS: Experiences of participation in the transition programme were generally positive. Meeting a transition coordinator trained in person-centred care and adolescent health and embarking on an educational process based on the adolescents' prerequisites in combination with peer support were considered key change mechanisms. However, support to parents were not sufficient for some participants, resulting in ambivalence about changing roles and the unmet needs of parents who required additional support. CONCLUSIONS: Participants experienced increased empowerment in several dimensions of this construct, thus demonstrating that the transition programme was largely implemented as intended and the evidence-based behaviour-change techniques used proved effective in reaching the outcome. These findings can inform future implementation of transition programmes and illuminate challenges associated with delivering a complex intervention for adolescents with chronic conditions
Discontinuation of follow-up care for young people with complex chronic conditions conceptual definitions and operational components by Sandra Skogby( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: A substantial proportion of young people with Complex Chronic Conditions (CCCs) experience some degree of discontinuation of follow-up care, which is an umbrella term to describe a broken chain of follow-up. Discontinuation of follow-up care is not clearly defined, and the great plethora of terms used within this field cannot go unnoticed. Terms such as "lost to follow-up", "lapses in care" and "care gaps", are frequently used in published literature, but differences between terms are unclear. Lack of uniformity greatly affects comparability of study findings. The aims of the present study were to (i) provide a systematic overview of terms and definitions used in literature describing discontinuation of follow-up care in young people with CCC's; (ii) to clarify operational components of discontinuation of follow-up care (iii); to develop conceptual definitions and suggested terms to be used; and (iv) to perform an expert-based evaluation of terms and conceptual definitions. Methods: A systematic literature search performed in PubMed was used to provide an overview of current terms used in literature. Using a modified summative content analysis, operational components were analysed, and conceptual definitions were developed. These conceptual definitions were assessed by an expert panel using a survey. Results: In total, 47 terms and definitions were retrieved, and a core set of operational components was identified. Three main types of discontinuation of follow-up care emerged from the analysis and expert evaluation, conceptually defined as follows: Lost to follow-up care: "No visit within a defined time period and within a defined context, and the patient is currently no longer engaged in follow-up care";Gap in follow-up care: "Exceeded time interval between clinic visits within a defined context, and the patient is currently engaged in follow-up care"; andUntraceability: "Failure to make contact due to lack of contact information". Conclusion: By creating a common vocabulary for discontinuation of follow-up care, the quality of future studies could improve. The conceptual definitions and operational components provide guidance to both researchers and healthcare professionals focusing on discontinuation of follow-up care for young people with CCCs
Qualitative study of facilitators and barriers for continued follow-up care as perceived and experienced by young people with congenital heart disease in Sweden by Sandra Skogby( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In-depth understanding of factors perceived by young people with congenital heart disease (CHD) to affect continued follow-up care is needed to tailor preventive strategies for discontinuation of follow-up care. To identify facilitating factors, low-prevalence settings in terms of discontinuation should be investigated. Objective: This qualitative study describes factors affecting continued follow-up as perceived and experienced by young adults with CHD. Participants: Using a mixed purposive sampling technique, 16 young adults with CHD were included. Three participants had discontinued follow-up care and 13 had continued follow-up care after transfer. Setting: Participants were recruited from all seven university hospitals in Sweden, which is considered a low-prevalence setting in terms of discontinuation. Design: Individual interviews were performed and subjected to qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis resulted in three main categories, illuminating factors affecting continued follow-up: (1) motivation for follow-up care; (2) participation in care and sense of connectedness with healthcare provider (HCP) and (3) care accessibility. The choice of continuing follow-up or not was multifactorial. Knowledge of your CHD and the importance of continuing follow-up care was a central factor, as well as experiencing CHD-related symptoms and having ongoing or planned medical treatment or interventions. Sensing a clear purpose with follow-up care was facilitating, as was feeling well treated and cared for by HCPs. Practical aspects, such as travel distance was also stressed, as well as active invitations and reminders for visits. Conclusion: Factors on both patient, hospital and healthcare system level were raised by participants, stressing the importance of holistic approaches when developing preventive strategies for discontinuation. There is a need for improved skills and competencies among HCPs, as well as a person-centred approach to follow-up care. In addition, specific healthcare needs and remaining transitional needs after transfer to adult care require careful consideration to prevent discontinuation
Process evaluation of complex cardiovascular interventions How to interpret the results of my trial? by Markus Saarijarvi( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Complex interventions of varying degrees of complexity are commonly used and evaluated in cardiovascular nursing and allied professions. Such interventions are increasingly tested using randomized trial designs. However, process evaluations are seldom used to better understand the results of these trials. Process evaluation aims to understand how complex interventions create change by evaluating implementation, mechanisms of impact, and the surrounding context when delivering an intervention. As such, this method can illuminate important mechanisms and clarify variation in results. In this article, process evaluation is described according to the Medical Research Council guidance and its use exemplified through a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a transition program for adolescents with chronic conditions
Factors affecting adolescents' participation in randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare interventions the case of the STEPSTONES project by Markus Saarijärvi( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

BACKGROUND: Recruitment of adolescents to intervention studies is a known challenge. For randomized controlled trials (RCT) to be generalizable, reach must be assessed, which means ascertaining how many of the intended population actually participated in the trial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reach and representativeness of an RCT evaluating the effectiveness of a complex intervention for adolescents with chronic conditions. METHODS: A mixed methods sequential explanatory design was employed. Firstly, quantitative cross-sectional data from the RCT, patient registries and medical records were collected and analysed regarding baseline differences between participants and non-participants in the trial. Secondly, qualitative data on their reasons for participating or not were collected and analysed with content analysis to explain the quantitative findings. RESULTS: Participants showed larger differences in effect sizes and a significantly more complex chronic condition than non-participants. No other statistically significant differences were reported, and effect sizes were negligible. Reasons for declining or accepting participation were categorized into three main categories: altruistic reasons, personal reasons and external reasons and factors. CONCLUSIONS: Integration of quantitative and qualitative findings showed that participation in the RCT was affected by disease complexity, the perceived need to give back to healthcare and research and the adolescents' willingness to engage in their illness. To empower adolescents with chronic conditions and motivate them to participate in research, future intervention studies should consider developing tailored recruitment strategies and communications with sub-groups that are harder to reach
 
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