WorldCat Identities

Tafforeau, Paul

Overview
Works: 22 works in 26 publications in 2 languages and 32 library holdings
Roles: Thesis advisor, Other, Opponent, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Paul Tafforeau
Wing bone geometry reveals active flight in Archaeopteryx by Dennis F. A. E Voeten( )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Archaeopteryx is an iconic fossil taxon with feathered wings from the Late Jurassic of Germany that occupies a crucial position for understanding the early evolution of avian flight. After over 150 years of study, its mosaic anatomy unifying characters of both non-flying dinosaurs and flying birds has remained challenging to interpret in a locomotory context. Here, we compare new data from three Archaeopteryx specimens obtained through phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography to a representative sample of archosaurs employing a diverse array of locomotory strategies. Our analyses reveal that the architecture of Archaeopteryx 's wing bones consistently exhibits a combination of cross-sectional geometric properties uniquely shared with volant birds, particularly those occasionally utilising short-distance flapping. We therefore interpret that Archaeopteryx actively employed wing flapping to take to the air through a more anterodorsally posteroventrally oriented flight stroke than used by modern birds. This unexpected outcome implies that avian powered flight must have originated before the latest Jurassic
Khoratpithecus et la radiation des hominoïdes en Asie du Sud-Est au Miocène by Edouard-Georges Emonet( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recent discovery of fossil hominoids in Thailand and Myanmar unveiled new episodes of the evolutionary history of this group. Those fossils were unearthed in three distinct sites: Chiang Muan in north-western Thailand, Khorat plateau in north-eastern Thailand and the Irrawaddy formation in Central Myanmar. These sites have been geologically characterized and precisely dated between 8.8 and 13 Ma. The descriptions of those fossils allowed an attribution to Khoratpithecus. Within this genus, three species have been recognized. Morphologically, Khoratpithecus display clear affinities to extant Pongo and, to a lesser extend, Sivapithecus from Siwaliks. The morphology of dental roots within hominoids has been studied using inner anatomy imaging techniques. This morphology displays high taxonomical value, and can be used in phylogenetical studies. Morphometrical analyses of dental crowns, along with virtual reconstruction of shattered or distorted fossils, have been performed using X-ray microtomography. Phylogenetical analyses integrating new specimens and new data confirmed Khoratpithecus as a sister-group of orang-utans. On the other hand, the genus Lufengpithecus, despite classically attributed to Pongo clade, appears closer to Dryopithecus than to Pongo. Such a phylogeny strengthens the hypothesis of a West-East migration through the South of Himalaya for Pongo clade, and a migration from Europe through the North of Himalaya fot Lufengpithecus
Disentangling isolated dental remains of Asian Pleistocene hominins and pongines by Tanya M Smith( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Neurocranial development of the coelacanth and the evolution of the sarcopterygian head by Hugo Dutel( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Synchrotron imaging of dentition provides insights into the biology of Hesperornis and Ichthyornis, the "last" toothed birds by Maitena Dumont( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The buccohypophyseal canal is an ancestral vertebrate trait maintained by modulation in sonic hedgehog signaling by Roman H Khonsari( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Détection et imagerie d'embryons fossilisés in ovo par microtomographie synchroton : étude des embryons énigmatiques de Phu Phok (Crétacé inférieur, Thaïlande) by Vincent Fernández( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Imaging by Malvina Lak( )

2 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Erratum to: the buccohypophyseal canal is an ancestral vertebrate trait maintained by modulation in sonic hedgehog signaling by Roman H Khonsari( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

3D Microstructural Architecture of Muscle Attachments in Extant and Fossil Vertebrates Revealed by Synchrotron Microtomography by Sophie Sanchez( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: Firm attachments binding muscles to skeleton are crucial mechanical components of the vertebrate body. These attachments (entheses) are complex three-dimensional structures, containing distinctive arrangements of cells and fibre systems embedded in the bone, which can be modified during ontogeny. Until recently it has only been possible to obtain 2D surface and thin section images of entheses, leaving their 3D histology largely unstudied except by extrapolation from 2D data. Entheses are frequently preserved in fossil bones, but sectioning is inappropriate for rare or unique fossil material. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we present the first non-destructive 3D investigation, by propagation phase contrast synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SR mu CT), of enthesis histology in extant and fossil vertebrates. We are able to identify entheses in the humerus of the salamander Desmognathus from the organization of bone-cell lacunae and extrinsic fibres. Statistical analysis of the lacunae differentiates types of attachments, and the orientation of the fibres, reflect the approximate alignment of the muscle. Similar histological structures, including ontogenetically related pattern changes, are perfectly preserved in two 380 million year old fossil vertebrates, the placoderm Compagopiscis croucheri and the sarcopterygian fish Eusthenopteron foordi. Conclusions/Significance: We are able to determine the position of entheses in fossil vertebrates, the approximate orientation of the attached muscles, and aspects of their ontogenetic histories, from PPC-SRmCT data. Sub-micron microtomography thus provides a powerful tool for studying the structure, development, evolution and palaeobiology of muscle attachments
The Mesozoic terminated in boreal spring by Melanie A. D During( )

1 edition published in 2022 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Cretaceous-Palaeogene mass extinction around 66 million years ago was triggered by the Chicxulub asteroid impact on the present-day Yucatán Peninsula. This event caused the highly selective extinction that eliminated about 76% of species, including all non-avian dinosaurs, pterosaurs, ammonites, rudists and most marine reptiles. The timing of the impact and its aftermath have been studied mainly on millennial timescales, leaving the season of the impact unconstrained. Here, by studying fishes that died on the day the Mesozoic era ended, we demonstrate that the impact that caused the Cretaceous-Palaeogene mass extinction took place during boreal spring. Osteohistology together with stable isotope records of exceptionally preserved perichondral and dermal bones in acipenseriform fishes from the Tanis impact-induced seiche deposits reveal annual cyclicity across the final years of the Cretaceous period. Annual life cycles, including seasonal timing and duration of reproduction, feeding, hibernation and aestivation, vary strongly across latest Cretaceous biotic clades. We postulate that the timing of the Chicxulub impact in boreal spring and austral autumn was a major influence on selective biotic survival across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary
Scales and Tooth Whorls of Ancient Fishes Challenge Distinction between External and Oral 'Teeth' by Qingming Qu( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The debate about the origin of the vertebrate dentition has been given fresh fuel by new fossil discoveries and developmental studies of extant animals. Odontodes (teeth or tooth-like structures) can be found in two distinct regions, the 'internal' oropharyngeal cavity and the 'external' skin. A recent hypothesis argues that regularly patterned odontodes is a specific oropharyngeal feature, whereas odontodes in the external skeleton lack this organization. However, this argument relies on the skeletal system of modern chondrichthyans (sharks and their relatives), which differ from other gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) groups in not having dermal bones associated with the odontodes. Their external skeleton is also composed of monoodontode 'placoid scales', whereas the scales of most early fossil gnathostomes are polyodontode, i.e. constructed from several odontodes on a shared bony base. Propagation phase contrast X-ray Synchrotron microtomography (PPC-SRmCT) is used to study the polyodontode scales of the early bony fish Andreolepis hedei. The odontodes constructing a single scale are reconstructed in 3D, and a linear and regular growth mechanism similar to that in a gnathostome dentition is confirmed, together with a second, gap-filling growth mechanism. Acanthodian tooth whorls are described, which show that ossification of the whorl base preceded and probably patterned the development of the dental lamina, in contrast to the condition in sharks where the dental lamina develops early and patterns the dentition. The new findings reveal, for the first time, how polyodontode scales grow in 3D in an extinct bony fish. They show that dentition-like odontode patterning occurs on scales and that the primary patterning unit of a tooth whorl may be the bony base rather than the odontodes it carries. These results contradict the hypothesis that oropharyngeal and external odontode skeletons are fundamentally separate and suggest that the importance of dermal bone interactions to odontode patterning has been underestimated
The developmental relationship between teeth and dermal odontodes in the most primitive bony fish Lophosteus by Donglei Chen( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The ontogenetic trajectory of a marginal jawbone of Lophosteus superbus (Late Silurian, 422 Million years old), the phylogenetically most basal stem osteichthyan, visualized by synchrotron microtomography, reveals a developmental relationship between teeth and dermal odontodes that is not evident from the adult morphology. The earliest odontodes are two longitudinal founder ridges formed at the ossification center. Subsequent odontodes that are added lingually to the ridges turn into conical teeth and undergo cyclic replacement, while those added labially achieve a stellate appearance. Stellate odontodes deposited directly on the bony plate are aligned with the alternate files of teeth, whereas new tooth positions are inserted into the files of sequential addition when a gap appears. Successive teeth and overgrowing odontodes show hybrid morphologies around the oral-dermal boundary, suggesting signal cross-communication. We propose that teeth and dermal odontodes are modifications of a single system, regulated and differentiated by the oral and dermal epithelia
Dynamics and evolution of dental replacement in Amniota by Thomas Bertin( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dental replacement consists in the formation of a new tooth which will come take the place of a former tooth, allowing for a renewal of the dental tissues as well as their environment (periodontium). To understand the evolution and the dynamics of tooth replacement, it is necessary to search for a relevant biological model. Because of the strong link between the replacement of teeth and periodontal tissues, I searched the diversity and evolutionary history of tooth replacement, attachment and implantation in extant and fossil amniotes. This work presented two objectives: clarify the terminology associated with replacement, implantation and attachment and review the current knowledges and hypothesis concerning the diversity and the evolution of the three features. In a second part, I studied continuous tooth replacement in archosaurians which present a continuous tooth replacement. First I investigated the teeth of the last groups of toothed-birds. To study the developmental mechanisms of continuous replacement, I studied the mechanisms of dental replacement in the Nile crocodile, through X-ray MicroCT. Nile crocodile's embryos present two type of teeth. The study of the genetic expression of the Notch pathway revealed that surface teeth and submerged teeth present a very similar development, and the main difference is the interruption of the development in the earliest. The Notch pathway also seems to be involved in tooth replacement in this species. In a third part, I studied one alternative to tooth replacement in group which lost the continuous tooth replacement. To do so, I studied the common warthog and the different adaptations of its dentition to highly abrasive diet. I mainly focused of the process of mesial drift, and all the physiological processes associated with drift to understand and recognize this phenomenon
Synchrotron X-ray imaging contribution to the study of animal mummification in ancient Egypt : archaeozoological study of crocodile mummies (Ptolemaic and Roman periods) by Camille Berruyer( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The ancient Egyptians mummified millions of animals. Few of these animal mummies have made it to our museums. The first analyses carried out on these artefacts led most of them to destruction or to a very poor conservation. Today, it seems essential to protect these precious archaeological objects. Non-destructive and non-invasive techniques are now used, such as Propagation Phase Contrast Synchrotron X-ray Microtomography (PPC-SRµCT). This technique was applied to a corpus of 55 animal mummies (49 crocodiles, five birds, one dog) from three different museums. The application of archaeozoological methods to the virtual microtomography images allowed the formulation of new hypotheses concerning, on the one hand, the management and preparation of crocodile mummies, and on the other hand, to propose an interpretation of this production within the ancient Egyptian calendar
Multiscale 3D Virtual Dissections of 100-Million-Year-Old Flowers Using X-Ray Synchrotron Micro- and Nanotomography( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Secondary ossification center induces and protects growth plate structure by Meng Xie( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Growth plate and articular cartilage constitute a single anatomical entity early in development but later separate into two distinct structures by the secondary ossification center (SOC). The reason for such separation remains unknown. We found that evolutionarily SOC appears in animals conquering the land - amniotes. Analysis of the ossification pattern in mammals with specialized extremities (whales, bats, jerboa) revealed that SOC development correlates with the extent of mechanical loads. Mathematical modeling revealed that SOC reduces mechanical stress within the growth plate. Functional experiments revealed the high vulnerability of hypertrophic chondrocytes to mechanical stress and showed that SOC protects these cells from apoptosis caused by extensive loading. Atomic force microscopy showed that hypertrophic chondrocytes are the least mechanically stiff cells within the growth plate. Altogether, these findings suggest that SOC has evolved to protect the hypertrophic chondrocytes from the high mechanical stress encountered in the terrestrial environment
Relations phylogénétiques des groupes majeurs de chondrichthyens paléozoïques et radiation des premiers gnathostomes : étude par microtomographie de l'anatomie interne du neurocrâne by Alan Pradel( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Recent gnathostomes are comprised of two major clades, the chondrichthyans, or cartilaginous fishes, and osteichthyans, or bony fishes and tetrapods. The chondrichthyans are represented by two clades, the Elasmobranchii (sharks, rays and skates) and Holocephali (chimaeroids). Modern holocephalans only represent about 4% of the total chondrichthyan species, but an important radiation of chondrichthyans took place in the Carboniferous (360-300 Ma), and generated an important diversity of taxa that are considered as related to extant holocephalans. Nevertheless, the relationships between these taxa and the two extant chondrichthyan clades, and even to other major extinct or extant Palaeozoic gnathostome taxa (acanthodians, placoderms, chondrichthyans, and osteichthyans), are still controversed. The neurocranial characters of extant and fossil chondrichthyans have been poorly studied until now, and recent phylogenetic analyses only consider few of them, because of their anatomical complexity, their a priori presumed evolutionary conservatism, the absence of clear landmarks for defining them, and their generally poor preservation in fossils. The material studied here, from the Upper Carboniferous of Kansas and Oklahoma (USA), consists of neurocrania, which are remarkably well preserved in three dimensions, and belong to two widely different taxa. These fossils were studied by means of computed microtomography scanning using X ray and synchrotron radiation X ray with phase contrast. A phylogenetic analysis, based on neurocranial characters only and including some other paleozoic and modern chondrichthyans taxa, and Palaeozoic acanthodian, placoderm and osteichthyan species, was performed. The result is that one of the two taxa studied here belongs to the iniopterygian family Sibyrhynchidae and is most closely related to the extant holocephalans. No other three-dimensionally preserved skull of any fossil holocephalan was known to date, contrary to fossil elasmobranchs. This provides means for a comparative study of skull anatomy in Palaeozoic representatives of the main two chondrichthyan clades. The other taxon studied here possesses a neurocranium which is morphologically closest to that of the Symmoriiformes. Nevertheless, many of its features also recall those of the Iniopterygidae, the other iniopterygian family, and the relationship between the iniopterygians, Symmoriiformes, and holocephalans are therefore discussed. The neurocranium appears as providing significant phylogenetic signals that are relevant to the characterization of the major chondrichthyan clades, even in the Paleozoic. Yet the deep relationships between the major clades of gnathostomes are still relatively controversial, and further investigation of three-dimensionally preserved braincases of various early gnathostomes, notably placoderms and acanthodians is needed for providing a clear-cut pattern of the morphotypic gnathostome braincase. The new techniques of computed microtomography scanning appears as powerful tools for studying these taxa. Thanks to these new techniques, notably Synchrotron Radiation holotomography, a probable case of exceptional preservation of the brain due to microbially induced authigenic phosphatization is described in one of the iniopterygian specimens, and points to future paleo-neuroanatomical investigations
Khoratpithecus et la radiation des hominoïdes en Asie du Sud-Est au Miocène by Edouard-Georges Emonet( )

1 edition published in 2011 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The recent discovery of fossil hominoids in Thailand and Myanmar unveiled new episodes of the evolutionary history of this group. Those fossils were unearthed in three distinct sites: Chiang Muan in north-western Thailand, Khorat plateau in north-eastern Thailand and the Irrawaddy formation in Central Myanmar. These sites have been geologically characterized and precisely dated between 8.8 and 13 Ma. The descriptions of those fossils allowed an attribution to Khoratpithecus. Within this genus, three species have been recognized. Morphologically, Khoratpithecus display clear affinities to extant Pongo and, to a lesser extend, Sivapithecus from Siwaliks. The morphology of dental roots within hominoids has been studied using inner anatomy imaging techniques. This morphology displays high taxonomical value, and can be used in phylogenetical studies. Morphometrical analyses of dental crowns, along with virtual reconstruction of shattered or distorted fossils, have been performed using X-ray microtomography. Phylogenetical analyses integrating new specimens and new data confirmed Khoratpithecus as a sister-group of orang-utans. On the other hand, the genus Lufengpithecus, despite classically attributed to Pongo clade, appears closer to Dryopithecus than to Pongo. Such a phylogeny strengthens the hypothesis of a West-East migration through the South of Himalaya for Pongo clade, and a migration from Europe through the North of Himalaya fot Lufengpithecus
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Alternative Names
Paul Tafforeau Frans paleontoloog

Paul Tafforeau französischer Paläontologe

Paul Tafforeau French paleontologist

Paul Tafforeau paleontòleg francès

Paul Tafforeau paleontólogo francês

Paul Tafforeau paleontologo francese

Paul Tafforeau paleontologo frantziarra

Paul Tafforeau paleontólogu francés

Paul Tafforeau paléontologue français (1977-)

Languages
English (19)

French (5)