WorldCat Identities

Vacher, Corinne

Overview
Works: 20 works in 20 publications in 2 languages and 64 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Author, Contributor, Opponent, Thesis advisor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Corinne Vacher
A Next-Generation of Biomonitoring to Detect Global Ecosystem Change by David Andrew Bohan( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This eBook is a collection of articles from a Frontiers Research Topic. Frontiers Research Topics are very popular trademarks of the Frontiers Journals Series: they are collections of at least ten articles, all centered on a particular subject. With their unique mix of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Frontiers Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author by contacting the Frontiers Editorial Office: frontiersin.org/about/contact
Forest tree genomics: 10 achievements from the past 10 years and future prospects by Christophe Plomion( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Retraite et croissance économique : un modèle de microsimulation appliquée à des données françaises by Corinne Vacher( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An evolutionary ecology perspective to address forest pathology challenges of today and tomorrow by Marie-Laure Desprez-Loustau( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Detection of structurally homogeneous subsets in graphs by Jean-Benoist Leger( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Phyllosphere Fungal Communities Differentiate More Thoroughly than Bacterial Communities Along an Elevation Gradient by Corinne Vacher( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ecological integration of alien species into a tree-parasitic fungus network by Corinne Vacher( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Vers une théorie spatiale des réseaux d'interaction en écologie : méthodes, concepts et applications by Marc Ohlmann( )

1 edition published in 2019 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This thesis focuses on the links between interaction networks, space and time. There is a paradigm shift in community ecology concerning the representation of a species community : from a collection of species towards species and their interactions, represented by an interaction network. We aim to build the bricks for a spatial network theory, by developing new methods, new models and applying it on ecological data. This manuscript contains four chapters. In a first chapter, we extend the diversity indices, built on Hill numbers, to network diversity indices. We define diversity indices across species aggregation levelsand show the interest of this method on a trophic network data set. In a second chapter, we develop a spatially explicit meta-community theory, with various kind of interactions. The theory contains a stochastic and a deterministic meta-community model. We then define the notion of meta-community persistence capacity. In a third chapter, we focus on network reconstruction from environmental DNA data along an environmental gradient.We show that the proposed method allows to evaluate the influence of environmental variables on community and infer a network in agreement with the literature on soil interactions. Finally, in a fourth chapter, we develop a method to combine environmental DNA data coming from different primers and show the efficiency of the method to better estimate plant abundances
Deciphering the Pathobiome: Intra- and Interkingdom Interactions Involving the Pathogen Erysiphe alphitoides by Boris Jakuschkin( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Avoid, attack or do both? Behavioral and physiological adaptations in natural enemies faced with novel hosts by Corinne Vacher( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microbiologie des plantes en coussin des milieux alpins : influence des facteurs biotiques et abiotiques dans l'assemblage des communautés microbiennes by Julien Roy( )

1 edition published in 2014 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Microorganisms are key component of Hearth biodiversity and ecosystem processes, especially in soils where they interact with plants. The objectives of the PhD was to caracterize the plant and abiotic respective influence on microbial spatial distribution. The work was based on a simplified soil biology model, the alpine cushion plants. We choose one species composed of variable morphotype, Silene acaulis,can ecosystem engineer species that creates de novo soil through growth. Sampling design includes soil within cushions and outside, spanning altitudinal and geological gradients. Molecular approachs were used to describe diversity and to genotype cushions.Cushions structures bacterial and fungal regional beta diversity through a local buffering of the influence of abiotic context, homogeneizing soil pH and by nutrient supply. This engineering effect increased in stressful conditions and varied according to plant genotype. Betadiversity differed between bacteria and fungi. Bacterial communities are mainly influenced by pH and converge within cushions while fungal communities correlate to cushion genetic, especially plant-associated biotrophs fungal clades. This work shows that plants act as a major biotic filter on microbial biogeography
Comparison and validation of Oomycetes metabarcoding primers for Phytophthora high throughput sequencing by Jean-Laurent Legeay( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Comparaison et évaluation d'approches bioinformatiques et statistiques pour l'analyse du pathobiome des plantes cultivées by Charlie Pauvert( )

1 edition published in 2019 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Les interactions entre micro-organismes sous-tendent de nombreux services écosystémiques, y compris la régulation des maladies des plantes cultivées. Un acteur de cette régulation est le pathobiome, défini comme le sous-ensemble des micro-organismes associés à une plante hôte en interaction avec un agent pathogène. L'un des défis actuels consiste à reconstruire les pathobiomes à partir de données de metabarcoding, pour identifier des agents potentiels de biocontrôle et pour surveiller en temps réel leurs réponses aux changements environnementaux. Plusieurs verrous méthodologiques doivent cependant être levés pour atteindre ces objectifs. Tout d'abord, il n'existe pas de consensus concernant l'approche bioinformatique la plus fiable pour déterminer l'identité et l'abondance des micro-organismes présents dans les échantillons végétaux. De plus, les réseaux microbiens construits avec les méthodes actuellement disponibles sont des réseaux d'associations statistiques entre des comptages de séquences, non directement superposables aux réseaux d'interactions (ex : compétition, parasitisme) entre micro-organismes. L'objectif de la thèse était donc de déterminer les approches bioinformatiques et statistiques les plus pertinentes pour reconstruire des réseaux d'interactions microbiennes à partir de données de metabarcoding. Le modèle d'étude était la vigne (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Merlot noir) et l'oïdium de la vigne, Erysiphe necator. Nous avons tout d'abord déterminé l'approche bioinformatique la plus adaptée pour identifier la communauté fongique associée à ce pathogène, en comparant la capacité de 360 pipelines à retrouver la composition d'une communauté artificielle de 189 souches fongiques. DADA2 est apparu comme l'outil le plus performant. Nous avons ensuite évalué l'influence de la pratique culturale (viticulture conventionnelle vs. biologique) sur les communautés fongiques des feuilles et évalué le niveau de réplicabilité des réseaux microbiens construits avec une méthode d'inférence classique, SparCC. La réplicabilité était très faible, jetant ainsi un doute sur l'utilité de ces réseaux pour le biocontrôle et la biosurveillance. Nous avons donc utilisé une nouvelle approche statistique, le modèle PLN, qui permet de prendre en compte la variabilité environnementale, pour explorer finement le pathobiome d'Erysiphe necator. Les interactions microbiennes prédites par le modèle sont en cours de comparaison avec des expériences de confrontations de levures en co-cultures. Une approche alternative, HMSC, a également été testée sur un autre modèle biologique et certaines prédictions ont été confrontées avec succès aux données de la littérature. Les réseaux microbiens, sous réserve d'amélioration des méthodes de reconstruction, pourraient donc être utilisés pour capturer les signaux des interactions biotiques dans le pathobiome
Impact of Interspecific Hybridization between Crops and Weedy Relatives on the Evolution of Flowering Time in Weedy Phenotypes by Corinne Vacher( )

1 edition published in 2011 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

BackgroundLike conventional crops, some GM cultivars may readily hybridize with their wild or weedy relatives. The progressive introgression of transgenes into wild or weedy populations thus appears inevitable, and we are now faced with the challenge of determining the possible evolutionary effects of these transgenes. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the impact of interspecific hybridization between transgenic plants and weedy relatives on the evolution of the weedy phenotype.Methodology/Principal FindingsExperimental populations of weedy birdseed rape (Brassica rapa) and transgenic rapeseed (B. napus) were grown under glasshouse conditions. Hybridization opportunities with transgenic plants and phenotypic traits (including phenological, morphological and reproductive traits) were measured for each weedy individual. We show that weedy individuals that flowered later and for longer periods were more likely to receive transgenic pollen from crops and weed×crop hybrids. Because stem diameter is correlated with flowering time, plants with wider stems were also more likely to be pollinated by transgenic plants. We also show that the weedy plants with the highest probability of hybridization had the lowest fecundity.Conclusion/SignificanceOur results suggest that weeds flowering late and for long periods are less fit because they have a higher probability of hybridizing with crops or weed×crop hybrids. This may result in counter-selection against this subset of weed phenotypes, and a shorter earlier flowering period. It is noteworthy that this potential evolution in flowering time does not depend on the presence of the transgene in the crop. Evolution in flowering time may even be counter-balanced by positive selection acting on the transgene if the latter was positively associated with maternal genes promoting late flowering and long flowering periods. Unfortunately, we could not verify this association in the present experiment
Impact of Interspecific Hybridization between Crops and Weedy Relatives on the Evolution of Flowering Time in Weedy Phenotypes by Corinne Vacher( )

1 edition published in 2011 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

BackgroundLike conventional crops, some GM cultivars may readily hybridize with their wild or weedy relatives. The progressive introgression of transgenes into wild or weedy populations thus appears inevitable, and we are now faced with the challenge of determining the possible evolutionary effects of these transgenes. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the impact of interspecific hybridization between transgenic plants and weedy relatives on the evolution of the weedy phenotype.Methodology/Principal FindingsExperimental populations of weedy birdseed rape (Brassica rapa) and transgenic rapeseed (B. napus) were grown under glasshouse conditions. Hybridization opportunities with transgenic plants and phenotypic traits (including phenological, morphological and reproductive traits) were measured for each weedy individual. We show that weedy individuals that flowered later and for longer periods were more likely to receive transgenic pollen from crops and weed×crop hybrids. Because stem diameter is correlated with flowering time, plants with wider stems were also more likely to be pollinated by transgenic plants. We also show that the weedy plants with the highest probability of hybridization had the lowest fecundity.Conclusion/SignificanceOur results suggest that weeds flowering late and for long periods are less fit because they have a higher probability of hybridizing with crops or weed×crop hybrids. This may result in counter-selection against this subset of weed phenotypes, and a shorter earlier flowering period. It is noteworthy that this potential evolution in flowering time does not depend on the presence of the transgene in the crop. Evolution in flowering time may even be counter-balanced by positive selection acting on the transgene if the latter was positively associated with maternal genes promoting late flowering and long flowering periods. Unfortunately, we could not verify this association in the present experiment
Impact de l'essence forestière sur les processus de dégradation et d'assimilation des polysaccharides végétaux par la communauté fongique des sols forestiers by Florian Barbi( )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The degradation of plant biomass is an essential process for the proper functioning of forest soils and terrestrial carbon cycling. Mechanisms involved in these processes are strongly controlled by saprotrophic fungi which secrete several hydrolytic enzymes to access at their primary nutrient sources found under the form of polysaccharides (cellulose and hemicelluloses). Enzymatic hydrolysis of plant polymers releases a high diversity of low molecular weight compounds (mono- and oligosaccharides). These molecules enter in fungal cell using transmembrane transporter systems. Consequently, the presence/absence and the substrate specificity of these transporters might contribute to the metabolic versatility of soil fungi. Several studies have demonstrated that tree species strongly affect diversity and composition of fungal communities. In this context, we hypothesized that the fungal communities selected by the different tree species expressed specific lignocellulolytic enzymes and sugar transporters; and thereby each fungal community was specifically adapted to the nature of litter produced by the tree species considered. We assessed, by the high-throughput sequencing of gene-fragments amplified from soil cDNA, the impact of tree species (Beech vs Spruce) on the diversity of genes encoding either lignocellulolytic enzymes or sugar porters expressed by soil fungi in two mono-specific forests. Our results revealed that most detected genes, encoding either lignocellulolytic enzymes or sugar transporters, have an unknown origin and are specifically found (for more than 80% of them) in one of the two forest soils. This work showed a significant “tree species effect” on the composition of functional genes expressed by soil fungi and suggests that beyond the species level, functional diversity of fungal communities must be addressed to better understand ecosystem functioning. Moreover, by using a functional metatranscriptomic approach, we identified functional transporter sequences differing with respect to their substrate specificities. From a spruce cDNA library, and for the first time, we identified high affinity or mannose specific transporters. Coincidently, as opposed to beech, spruce is indeed a tree species with a large proportion of mannose in its hemicelluloses
Structure des assemblages fongiques de la phyllosphère des arbres forestiers et effet potentiel du changement climatique by Tristan Cordier( )

1 edition published in 2012 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Phyllosphere is the habitat provided by the leaves of living plants. Many microbial species -pathogens, saprophytes or mutualists of plants - inhabit this environment. These microbes therefore influence the dynamics and structure of plant communities. The main objective was to study the potential effects of climate change on the structure of phyllosphere fungal assemblages, and on the ecological niche of pathogenic fungal species of forest trees. We used two approaches, i) the study of altitudinal gradients and ii) the construction of bioclimatic niche models. Since phyllosphere fungal assemblages of forest trees are still poorly known, we first described their diversity and quantified their spatial variability at the scale of a forest stand.Our results show that the phyllosphere of a forest tree houses hundreds of fungal species, with few dominant species and many rare species. Factors structuring these assemblages include both abiotic and biotic factors: the temperature appears as the most explanatory variable along an elevation algradient. At the scale of a forest stand, the genetic proximity between trees is more important than the geographic distance. Analysis of the bioclimatic niche models of pathogenic fungi forest at the French scale highlights some climatic limitations, and the summer rainfall is an important explanatory variable. However, many introduced species already occupy the distribution of their host, without apparent climatic limitation. The effects of climate change on most pathogens will be exercised indirectly by very important depressive effects on the abundance of their host trees. Only pathogens adapted to the Mediterranean biotope would increase their impact
Functions, transmission and emission of the canopy microbiota by Tania Fort( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trees interact with diverse microbial communities that influence their fitness and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Unlike microorganisms associated with roots and soil, microorganisms that colonize the forest canopy are still poorly understood. The objective of this thesis is to better understand the functions of microorganisms associated with the aerial parts of trees (leaves, stems, seeds) as well as their vertical (from the plant to its offspring) and horizontal (emission from the plant to the atmosphere) transmission dynamics, by combining molecular ecology and plant ecophysiology analyses. The first chapter [P1] shows a vertical stratification of fungal and foliar bacterial communities within the beech canopy (Fagus sylvatica). This stratification is more pronounced for epiphytic microorganisms than for endophytes. It also decreases during the growing season in bacteria and appears to be related to morphology rather than foliar physiology. Vertical stratification of microbial functions is being analyzed. The second chapter [P2] highlights the presence of fungi in the internal tissues of the acorns of sessile oak (Quercus petraea), including the embryo, suggesting that the microbiota can be transmitted vertically from the mother tree to its offsprings and influence forest regeneration. Acorns contain in particular several fungal pathogens, in association with their mycoparasites. These fungal communities vary significantly depending on the mother tree and the oak population. Finally, the third chapter [P3] tests a prototype for measuring bacterial emission fluxes over plant cover. It shows that half of the species captured in the atmosphere are present on the leaf surface and suggests that the composition of bioaerosols is strongly influenced by the locally dominant cultivated plant, the grapevine (Vitis vinifera). Complementary measures, including a wider range of forest and non-forestry habitats, will have to be carried out to better understand the origin of emissions, which are known to influence the water cycle. This thesis therefore provides elements for modelling the dynamics and evolution of the tree-microbiota-atmosphere system, which will need to be strengthened and integrated into knowledge of the soil system in order to respond to the challenges raised by climate change
Effet du paysage sur la structure des communautés fongiques foliaires by Thomas Fort( )

1 edition published in 2016 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Plant leaves host a large diversity of microorganisms. Among the factors shaping foliar microbial community structure, the effect of the dispersal process remain understudied. Landscape elements, such as edges or landscape heterogenity, influence migration and dispersal of many macro-organism species. However, the effect of such factors on foliar microbial communities has never been studied. We hypothesized that forests are a source of foliar fungi for adjacent vineyards. We compared foliar and airborne fungal communities in vineyard and adjacent forests along a vegetative season, we examined the effect of a forest edge on these communities in a vineyard, and weassessed the effect of landscape composition on these communities. Fungal communities were characterized with a metabarcoding method. Foliar fungal communities in vineyards and forests diverge over the course of the vegetative season. Neither the distance to the edge nor the proportion of forest in the landscape affect foliar fungal communities in vineyards, while airborne communities change with the distance to the forest edge. These results suggest that dispersal is not dominant in shaping foliar fungal communities. Instead, many selective pressures such as agricultural practices seem to shape strongly these communities. Further investigations are required in order to estimate the relative contribution of those processes, and the potential ecosystem service provided by the forest to crops
 
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Alternative Names
Corinne Vacher wetenschapper

Languages
English (10)

French (8)