WorldCat Identities

Liozon, Eric

Overview
Works: 19 works in 19 publications in 2 languages and 28 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals 
Roles: Thesis advisor, Other, Author
Classifications: RC900.9, 616.047
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Eric Liozon
Pronostic et suivi de l'artérite giganto-cellulaire : analyse sur 387 cas by François Thouy( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most frequently occurring form of vasculitis in the elderly. Previous studies have underlined the importance of its mortality and morbidity rates in this population. The Hortolim cohort is a monocentric retrospective study conducted by the Department of Internal Medicine of the University Hospital in Limoges, France. 387 patients were included between 1976 and 10/30/2011. Our objective was to first determine the mortality rate in GCA, and to identify the predicting factors of morbidity, including those linked to the arteritis itself as well as those associated with the corticosteroid treatment, disease recurrences and relapses. The survival median is at 72 months. The SMR is estimated at 1.12(1.09-1.16). The mean causes are cardiovascular and neoplastic events. Contributing factors include an elevated CRP (OR 0.29), advanced age (OR 1.15), a clinical temporal arteritis (OR 0,52) and the highest doses of corticosteroids after three months of treatment (OR 1.06). Arteritis-related morbidity is attributed to ischemic cardiopathy, for which arterial hypertension remains the risk factor. Ischemic strokes have as factor tabacco (OR 3,52), diabetes de-novo (OR 3,35) and cephalalgia (OR 0,33). No identifiable risk factors emerged as predictors of the visual complications. Corticosteroid-induced diabetes, arterial hypertension, osteoporosis and infections are also frequent. With regard to recurrences, corticosteroid-induced diabetes is shown to be a predicting factor (OR 3.12). Excess mortality in GCA appears to be minimal. Our findings suggest different risk factors for principal complications than those previously reported in existing literature
Giant cell arteritis presenting as isolated inflammatory response and/or fever of unknown origin: a case-control study by Hubert de Boysson( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Giant-cell arteritis: concordance study between aortic CT angiography and FDG-PET/CT in detection of large-vessel involvement by Hubert De Boysson( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Artérite des membres supérieurs au cours de la maladie de Horton by Emmanuel Savignac( )

1 edition published in 2000 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Toxocarose de l'adulte en médecine interne : à propos de 30 observations by Freddy Hiribarren( )

1 edition published in 1998 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Facteurs prédictifs des complications céphaliques ischémiques irréversibles dans la maladie de Horton : étude prospective sur 178 patients by Kim Heang Ly( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fièvres prolongées d'évolution intermittente : à propos de 22 observations by Stéphane Rabet( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maladie de Horton : formes oedémateuses by Marie Laure Portal( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

LES LYMPHOMES O.R.L. : A PROPOS DE 20 CAS by Eric Liozon( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Manifestations coronaires au cours de la maladie de Horton : étude prospective de 200 cas by Corinne Lafforgue( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in French and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

La maladie de Horton est une panartérite inflammatoire subaiguë à cellules géantes du sujet âgé, de topographie segmentaire et plurifocale, prédominant dans le territoire céphalique mais capable de diffuser à toutes les artères de gros et de moyen calibre dont les artères coronaires. La fréquence de cette atteinte coronaire, souvent asymptomatique cliniquement est estimée sur le plan histo-pathologique à 42% des patients autopsiés atteints d'une maladie de Horton. Nous avons réalisé une étude prospective portant sur 200 patients hospitalisés ou suivis dans le service de Médecine interne du CHRU de Limoges de janvier 1976 au premier mai 2001 afin d'établir la fréquence de cette atteinte, les critères d'imputabilité des manifestations coronaires à une coronarite, la chronologie de survenue de ces manifestations coronaires par rapport à la date de découverte de la maladie de Horton et à celle du début de la corticothérapie et la prise en charge thérapeutique spécifique de cette atteinte. Dans notre série la fréquence de l'atteinte coronaire symptomatique est de 3%. Ces manifestations coronaires sont très rarement inaugurales, pour 2/3 des patients elles sont apparues pendant les 15 premiers jours de la corticothérapie. La prise en charge thérapeutique spécifique de cette localisation coronaire doit se faire sous corticoïdes à fortes doses et sous anti-agrégants plaquettaires. Une corticothérapie à la dose initiale de 1 mg/kg/j serait la plus adaptée à cette atteinte
Steroid-sparing effect and toxicity of dapsone treatment in giant cell arteritis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Abstract: Although a glucocorticoid (GC)-sparing strategy is needed for patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffering from refractory disease or serious treatment-related complications, evidence of efficacy in this setting of immunosuppressive drugs and biotherapies is lacking. Herein, we evaluated the GC-sparing effects and tolerability of addition of dapsone (DDS) to prednisone therapy in patients with GCA. We retrospectively assessed data on 18 GCA patients who received DDS as a first-line treatment (DDS-1 group) and 52 patients who received it as a second- or third-line treatment for refractory GCA, with or without excessive GC-related toxicity (DDS-2 group). Of these 70 patients, 63 belonged to an inception cohort of 478 patients, whereas the remaining 7 were referred to our department for resistant GCA. In all, 52 patients were assessable for DDS efficacy. The baseline characteristics of the DDS-1 patients were similar to those of 395 GCA patients (control group) who received prednisone alone. DDS-1 patients had a more sustained decrease in GC dose with a lower mean prednisone dose at 12 months, and they comprised higher proportions who achieved GC withdrawal within the first year, who stopped prednisone treatment, and who recovered from GCA (P <0.001 for each variable). Patients in the DDS-2 group achieved a mean rate of prednisone reduction of 65% and a prednisone dose reduction of 16.9 ± 13.3 mg/d. The monthly decreases in the prednisone dose were 2.4 and 1.25 mg in DDS-1 and DDS-2 patients, respectively. DDS-induced side effects were recorded in 44 (64%) assessable patients. These side effects led to lowering of the DDS dose by 25 mg/d in 11 (16%) patients and permanent cessation of DDS in 14 patients (20%), due to allergic skin rash in 7, agranulocytosis in 2, icteric hepatitis in 2, and excessive hemolysis in 2 patients. DDS is a potent GC-sparing agent in GCA that should be evaluated in prospective studies. However, DDS use should be restricted to refractory GCA patients due to its toxicity, and close clinical and laboratory monitoring for 3 months is necessary
Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Abstract: Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9-250] mg/L vs 120 [3-120] mg/L; P <0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also a lower rate of disease relapse (12/31 (39%) vs 67/112 (60%); P = 0.04). Our results suggest that patients without cranial symptoms/signs are prone to lower inflammatory laboratory parameters, fewer relapses, and more large-vessel involvement than those displaying cardinal cranial manifestations. Further studies are therefore required in order to determine whether these 2 subgroups of patients have a different prognosis, and therefore warrant different therapeutic and monitoring regimens
Determinants of Hydroxychloroquine Blood Concentration Variations in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Objective Blood concentrations of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) vary widely among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship has been found in different situations, and a very low blood concentration of HCQ is a simple marker of nonadherence to treatment. Therefore, interest in blood HCQ concentration measurement has increased, but little is known about factors that influence blood HCQ concentration variability. This study was undertaken to analyze determinants of blood HCQ concentrations. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patient data, including data from the Plaquenil Lupus Systemic (PLUS) study, to determine the association of epidemiologic, clinical, and biologic factors with blood HCQ concentrations. Data for nonadherent patients (blood HCQ concentration <200 ng/ml) were excluded. Results To examine homogeneous pharmacologic data, we restricted the analyses of the PLUS data to the 509 SLE patients receiving 400 mg/day. We found no association of ethnicity or smoking with blood HCQ concentrations and no pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction with antacids or with inhibitors or inducers of cytochrome P450 enzymes. On multivariate analysis, high body mass index (P = 0.008), no treatment with corticosteroids (P = 0.04), increased time between the last tablet intake and measurement of blood HCQ concentrations (P = 0.017), low platelet count (P <0.001), low neutrophil count (P <0.001), and high estimated creatinine clearance (P <0.001) were associated with low blood HCQ concentrations. In 22 SLE patients with chronic renal insufficiency (median serum creatinine clearance 52 ml/minute [range 23-58 ml/minute]) who received 400 mg/day HCQ, the median blood HCQ concentration was significantly higher than that in the 509 patients from the PLUS study (1, 338 ng/ml [range 504-2, 229 ng/ml] versus 917 ng/ml [range 208-3316 ng/ml]) (P <0.001). Conclusion We provide a comprehensive analysis of determinants of blood HCQ concentrations. Because this measurement is increasingly being used, these data might be useful for clinicians
Autoimmune and inflammatory diseases associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A series of 26 cases and literature review( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: Vasculitis are the most frequent autoimmune diseases associated with CMML. CMML features are worse when associated to SAIDs. Hypomethylating agents may represent an alternative therapy after steroids. Abstract: We wanted to describe the characteristics, treatment and outcome of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases (SAIDs) associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and conducted a French multicenter retrospective study and a literature review. We included 26 cases of CMML (median age 75 years, 54% female), 80% with CMML-1. CPSS score was low (0 or 1) in 75% of cases. SAIDS was systemic vasculitis in 54%. Diagnosis of the 2 diseases was concomitant in 31% cases, and CMML was diagnosed before SAIDs in 12 cases (46%). First line treatment for SAIDs consisted mostly of steroid, with 85% of response. Second-line treatment was needed in 40% cases. Six patients received hypomethylating agents, with 66% response on SAIDs. A literature review found 49 cases of CMML-associated SAIDs, in whom SAIDs was systemic vasculitis in 29% cases. Hence, vasculitis is the most frequent SAIDs associated with CMML. After initial response to steroids, recurrence and steroid-dependence were frequent. Hypomethylating agents may be interesting in this context
120 diagnostics à ne pas manquer by Élisabeth Vidal-Cathala( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Si l'erreur de diagnostic n'est pas une faute pénale en soi, les conditions dans lesquelles le médecin a été conduit à faire cette erreur, peuvent par contre être retenues comme constitutives de fautes. La tendance actuelle à la judiciarisation de la relation médecin-malade et la surcharge de travail obligent encore davantage tous les praticiens à optimiser la prise en charge d'un patient, qui commence évidemment par un diagnostic juste. Ce diagnostic se doit donc d'être précis et rapide et s'appuie sur des signes cliniques ou des symptômes évoqués par le patient. Il repose
Adding Azathioprine to Remission-Induction Glucocorticoids for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss), Microscopic Polyangiitis, or Polyarteritis Nodosa Without Poor Prognosis Factors( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Objective: In most patients with nonsevere systemic necrotizing vasculitides (SNVs), remission is achieved with glucocorticoids alone, but one-third experience a relapse within 2 years. This study was undertaken to determine whether the addition of azathioprine (AZA) to glucocorticoids could achieve a higher sustained remission rate of newly diagnosed nonsevere eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), or polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). Methods: All patients included in this double-blind trial received glucocorticoids, gradually tapered over 12 months, and were randomized to receive AZA or placebo for 12 months, with stratification according to SNV (EGPA or MPA/PAN). The primary end point was the combined rate of remission induction failures and minor or major relapses at month 24. Results: Ninety-five patients (51 with EGPA, 25 with MPA, and 19 with PAN) met the inclusion criteria, were randomized, and received at least 1 dose of AZA (n = 46) or placebo (n = 49). At month 24, 47.8% of the patients receiving AZA versus 49% of the patients receiving placebo had remission induction failures or relapses (P = 0.86). Secondary end points were comparable between the AZA and placebo arms. These included initial remission rate (95.7% versus 87.8%), total relapse rate (44.2% versus 40.5%), and glucocorticoid use. Two patients in the placebo arm died; 22 patients in the AZA arm (47.8%) and 23 patients in the placebo arm (46.9%) experienced e" severe adverse event. For EGPA patients, the primary end point (48% in the AZA arm versus 46.2% in the placebo arm) and the percent of patients who experienced asthma/rhinosinusitis exacerbations (24% in the AZA arm versus 19.2% in the placebo arm) were comparable between treatment arms. Conclusion: Addition of AZA to glucocorticoids for the induction of remission of nonsevere SNVs does not improve remission rates, lower relapse risk, spare steroids, or diminish the EGPA asthma/rhinosinusitis exacerbation rate
18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and the risk of subsequent aortic complications in giant-cell arteritis( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : Abstract: Previous studies reported a 2- to 17-fold higher risk of aortic complications (dilation or dissection) in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We aimed to determine whether or not GCA patients with large-vessel involvement demonstrated by positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) have a higher risk of aortic complications. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study between 1995 and 2014. Patients were included if they fulfilled at least 3 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with extratemporal biopsy-proven giant-cell vasculitis; they underwent at least 1 FDG-PET/CT scan at diagnosis or during follow-up; and the morphology of the aorta was assessed by medical imaging at diagnosis. Patients with an aortic complication at the time of diagnosis were excluded. Of the 130 patients included [85 women (65%), median age 70 (50-86)], GCA was biopsy proven in 77 (59%). FDG-PET/CT was performed at diagnosis in 63 (48%) patients and during the follow-up period in the 67 (52%) remaining patients. FDG-PET/CT was positive in 38/63 (60%) patients at diagnosis and in 31/67 (46%) patients when performed during follow-up (P = NS). One hundred four patients (80%) underwent at least 1 morphological assessment of the aorta during follow-up. Nine (9%) patients developed aortic complications (dilation in all and dissection in 1) at a median time of 33 (6-129) months after diagnosis. All of them displayed large-vessel inflammation on previous FDG-PET/CT. A positive FDG-PET/CT was significantly associated with a higher risk of aortic complications (P = 0.004). In our study, a positive FDG-PET/CT was associated with an increased risk of aortic complications at 5 years
Efficacy of Azacitidine in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders associated with myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: AID associated to MDS/CMML is difficult to manage. Azacitidine can improve the control of AID associated with MDS/CMML. Azacitidine allows to reduce steroid dose in most MDS patients with concurrent AID. Azacitidine can be beneficial on AID, even when inactive on the underlying MDS/CMML. Abstract: This retrospective study describes efficacy of Azacitidine on autoimmune disorders (AID) associated with MDS/CMML in 22 patients. Response of AID to Azacitidine was observed in 19 patients (86%). Reduction or discontinuation of steroids and/or immunosuppressive therapy (IST) was possible in 16 cases (73%). Hematologic response was seen in 55% of the patients. MDS/CMML and AID evolution was concordant in 13 cases (59%): both favorable (n = 11), both unfavorable (n = 2), but AID improved while MDS/CMML worsened (n = 8) and vice versa (n = 1). Azacitidine frequently seems effective in controlling steroid-dependent AID associated with MDS/CMML, but prospective studies are necessary to confirm those findings
Pronostic et suivi de l'artérite giganto-cellulaire analyse sur 387 cas by François Thouy( )

1 edition published in 2012 in French and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most frequently occurring form of vasculitis in the elderly. Previous studies have underlined the importance of its mortality and morbidity rates in this population. The Hortolim cohort is a monocentric retrospective study conducted by the Department of Internal Medicine of the University Hospital in Limoges, France. 387 patients were included between 1976 and 10/30/2011. Our objective was to first determine the mortality rate in GCA, and to identify the predicting factors of morbidity, including those linked to the arteritis itself as well as those associated with the corticosteroid treatment, disease recurrences and relapses. The survival median is at 72 months. The SMR is estimated at 1.12(1.09-1.16). The mean causes are cardiovascular and neoplastic events. Contributing factors include an elevated CRP (OR 0.29), advanced age (OR 1.15), a clinical temporal arteritis (OR 0,52) and the highest doses of corticosteroids after three months of treatment (OR 1.06). Arteritis-related morbidity is attributed to ischemic cardiopathy, for which arterial hypertension remains the risk factor. Ischemic strokes have as factor tabacco (OR 3,52), diabetes de-novo (OR 3,35) and cephalalgia (OR 0,33). No identifiable risk factors emerged as predictors of the visual complications. Corticosteroid-induced diabetes, arterial hypertension, osteoporosis and infections are also frequent. With regard to recurrences, corticosteroid-induced diabetes is shown to be a predicting factor (OR 3.12). Excess mortality in GCA appears to be minimal. Our findings suggest different risk factors for principal complications than those previously reported in existing literature
 
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120 diagnostics à ne pas manquer
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French (9)