WorldCat Identities

Louviere, Jordan J.

Overview
Works: 43 works in 86 publications in 1 language and 2,521 library holdings
Roles: Author, Other, Contributor
Classifications: HF5415.32, 658.8342
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jordan J Louviere
Stated choice methods : analysis and applications by Jordan J Louviere( )

33 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 2,225 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Understanding and predicting the behavior of decision makers when choosing among discrete goods has been one of the most fruitful areas of applied research over the past thirty years. An understanding of individual consumer behavior can lead to significant changes in product or service design, pricing strategy, distribution channel and communication strategy selection, as well as public welfare analysis. This book is a reference work dealing with the study and prediction of consumer choice behavior, concentrating on stated preference (SP) methods -- placing decision makers in controlled experiments that evaluate hypothetical choices rather than actual choices in the market. It shows how SP methods can be implemented, from experimental design to econometric modeling, and suggests how to combine RP and SP data to get the best from each type. The book also presents an update of econometric approaches to choice modeling.--Back cover
Best-worst scaling : theory, methods and applications by Jordan J Louviere( Book )

11 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 253 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Best-worst scaling (BWS) is an extension of the method of paired comparison to multiple choices that asks participants to choose both the most and the least attractive options or features from a set of choices. It is an increasingly popular way for academics and practitioners in social science, business, and other disciplines to study and model choice. This book provides an authoritative and systematic treatment of best-worst scaling, introducing readers to the theory and methods for three broad classes of applications. It uses a variety of case studies to illustrate simple but reliable ways to design, implement, apply, and analyze choice data in specific contexts, and showcases the wide range of potential applications across many different disciplines. Best-worst scaling avoids many rating scale problems and will appeal to those wanting to measure subjective quantities with known measurement properties that can be easily interpreted and applied. --
Obtaining citizens' input for a new Canadian constitution : an application of tradeoff analysis by Adam Finn( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Valuing Preferences for the Process and Outcomes of Clinical Genetics Services: A Pilot Study by Ewan Gray( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The development of ORACLe: a measure of an organisation's capacity to engage in evidence-informed health policy by Steve R Makkar( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using conjoint analysis to develop a system to score research engagement actions by health decision makers by Steve R Makkar( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using conjoint analysis to develop a system of scoring policymakers' use of research in policy and program development by Steve R Makkar( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Choice experiments in health : the good, the bad, the ugly and toward a brighter future by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Compared to many applied areas of economics, health economics has a strong tradition in eliciting and using stated preferences (SP) in policy analysis. Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are one SP method increasingly used in this area. Literature on DCEs in health and more generally has grown rapidly since the mid-1990s. Applications of DCEs in health have come a long way, but to date few have been ‘best practice’, in part because ‘best practice’ has been somewhat of a moving target. The purpose of this paper is to briefly survey the history of DCEs and the state of current knowledge, identify and discuss knowledge gaps, and suggest potentially fruitful areas for future research to fill such gaps with the aim of moving the application of DCEs in health economics closer to best practice
Using best-worst scaling choice experiments to measure public perceptions and preferences for healthcare reform in Australia by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Results: A sample of 204 respondents participated in the survey (a participation rate of 85%). Quality and safety was the most important principle and a culture of reflective improvement and innovation was the least important. Public voice and community engagement was the second least important principle and was also understood by barely half the respondents
An introduction to the application of (case 1) best-worst scaling in marketing research by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We review and discuss recent developments in best–worst scaling (BWS) that allow researchers to measure items or objects on measurement scales with known properties. We note that BWS has some distinct advantages compared with other measurement approaches, such as category rating scales or paired comparisons. We demonstrate how to use BWS to measure subjective quantities in two different empirical examples. One of these measures preferences for weekend getaways and requires comparing relatively few objects; a second measures academics' perceptions of the quality of academic marketing journals and requires comparing a significantly large set of objects. We conclude by discussing some limitations and future research opportunities related to BWS
Consumer assessment of social product features : an empirical investigation using choice experiments( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Does it all come out in the wash? : tales from the laundry room by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The survey was based on several discrete choice experiments (DCEs) with additional questions designed to measures environmental attitudes, opinions and values, as well as sociodemographic and similar questions consistent with those asked in the Census of Population. We designed and implemented several between-subjects conditions associated with the DCEs to test several policy-relevant behavioural hypotheses about the role of social norms and engaging individuals as part of their community. We estimated an implied rate of time preference from the DCEs, and found that rates of time preference vary only marginally under various informational conditions. Our results suggest that (for the Australian market at least) there are distinct market segments who are more likely to respond to messages about community norms. In turn, this suggests that particular communication strategies might be more effective for certain market segments, and that one must focus not only on product features and prices, but also message and information framing to produce desired and desirable behavioural responses and outcomes
Discrete choice experiments are not conjoint analysis by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We briefly review and discuss traditional conjoint analysis (CA) and discrete choice experiments (DCEs), widely used stated preference elicitation methods in several disciplines. We pay particular attention to the origins and basis of CA, and show that it is generally inconsistent with economic demand theory, and is subject to several logical inconsistencies that make it unsuitable for use in applied economics, particularly welfare and policy assessment. We contrast this with DCEs that have a long-standing, well-tested theoretical basis in random utility theory, and we show why and how DCEs are more general and consistent with economic demand theory. Perhaps the major message, though, is that many studies that claim to be doing conjoint analysis are really doing DCE
Using discrete choice modelling to investigate breast screening participation by Karen Gerard( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Formal choice models of informal choices : what choice modeling research can (and can't) learn from behavioral theory by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this paper we illustrate the benefits of forging a better alliance among behavioral, economic, and statistical approaches to modeling consumer choice behavior. We focus on the problems that arise when building descriptive models of choice in evolving markets, where consumers are likely to have poorly developed preferences and be influenced by beliefs about future market changes. We illustrate how understanding the actual process that is driving preferences can provide analysts with both better a priori insights into the model structures that are likely to provide the best descriptive account of choices in such settings, as well as how stable these structures are likely to be over time. We show, for example, that analogical reasoning heuristics—a common strategy for making decisions under preference uncertainty—can produce choice patterns that resemble the output of complex nonlinear, nonadditive, multi-attribute utility rules. Likewise, because novice consumers are likely to display strong individual differences in the variance of unobserved components of utility, methods that fail to recognize such differences will tend to overstate the actual extent of taste heterogeneity that exists in a population. We also illustrate the benefits of a reverse dialogue, examining how economic theory can lead behavioral researchers to more parsimonious explanations for apparent anomalies in choice tasks where preferences are uncertain. We show, for example, that some ad hoc models that have been used to statistically describe the compromise effect in choice can be deduced from first principles of rational risky decision making
Relating stated preference measures and models to choices in real markets: calibration of CV responses by Jordan Louviere( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Consumer social beliefs : an international investigation using best-worst scaling methodology( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Benefit assessment for cost-benefit analysis studies in health care using discrete choice experiements : estimating welfare in a health care setting by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the idea of using stated preference discrete choice experiments (SPDCEs) for valuation and welfare estimation. We begin by discussing SPDCEs and the random utility theory-based choice models that underlie their analysis. Given the purpose of this handbook, this naturally then leads to a discussion of how to use choice models estimated from SPDCEs to carry out valuation and welfare analysis
Modeling the choices of individual decision-makers by combining efficient choice experiment designs with extra preference information by Jordan Louviere( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We show how to combine statistically efficient ways to design discrete choice experiments based on random utility theory with new ways of collecting additional information that can be used to expand the amount of available choice information for modeling the choices of individual decision makers. Here we limit ourselves to problems involving generic choice options and linear and additive indirect utility functions, but the approach potentially can be extended to include choice problems with non-additive utility functions and non-generic/labeled options/attributes. The paper provides several simulated examples, a small empirical example to demonstrate proof of concept, and a larger empirical example based on many experimental conditions and large samples that demonstrates that the individual models capture virtually all the variance in aggregate first choices traditionally modeled in discrete choice experiments
Simple ways to estimate choice models for single consumers by Bart Frischknecht( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Stated choice methods : analysis and applications
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Alternative Names
Jordan Louviere wetenschapper

Louviere, J.

Louviere, J. J.

Louviere, Jordan

Languages
English (62)