WorldCat Identities

Stillman, Steven

Overview
Works: 61 works in 119 publications in 2 languages and 478 library holdings
Genres: Longitudinal studies 
Roles: Author, Contributor
Classifications: HN930.5, 304.893
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Steven Stillman
How important is selection? : experimental versus non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration by David McKenzie( )

7 editions published between 2006 and 2010 in English and held by 77 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The authors also conducted a survey of individuals who did not apply for the lottery. Comparing this non-applicant group with the migrants enables assessment of the degree to which non-experimental methods can provide an unbiased estimate of the income gains from migration. They find evidence of migrants being positively selected in terms of both observed and unobserved skills. As a result, non-experimental methods are found to overstate the gains from migration, by 9 to 82 percent. A good instrumental variable works best, while difference-in-differences and bias-adjusted propensity-score matching also perform comparatively well
The Impacts of International Migration on Remaining Household Members Omnibus Results from a Migration Lottery Program by John Gibson( )

9 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impacts of international migration on development in the sending countries, and especially the effects on remaining household members, are increasingly studied. However, comparisons of households in developing countries with and without migrants are complicated by a double-selectivity problem: households self-select into migration, and among households involved in migration, some send a subset of members with the rest remaining while other households migrate en masse. The authors address these selectivity issues using the randomization provided by an immigration ballot under the Pacific Access Category of New Zealand?s immigration policy. They survey applicants to the 2002-05 ballots in Tonga and compare outcomes for the remaining household members of emigrants with those for members of similar households that were unsuccessful in the ballots. The immigration laws determine which household members can accompany the principal migrant, providing an instrument to address the second selectivity issue. Using this natural experiment, the authors examine the myriad impacts that migration has on remaining household members, focussing on labor supply, income, durable assets, financial service usage, diet, and physical and mental health. The analysis uses multiple hypothesis testing procedures to examine which impacts are robust. The findings indicate that the overall impact on households left behind is largely negative. The findings also reveal evidence that both sources of selectivity matter, leading studies that fail to adequately address them to misrepresent the impact of migration
Migrant youths educational achievement : the role of institutions by Deborah A Cobb-Clark( )

9 editions published in 2011 in English and German and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We use 2009 Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) data to link institutional arrangements in OECD countries to the disparity in reading, math, and science test scores for migrant and native-born students. We find that achievement gaps are larger for those migrant youths who arrive later and for those who do not speak the test language at home. Institutional arrangements often serve to mitigate the achievement gaps of some migrant students while leaving unaffected or exacerbating those of others. For example, earlier school starting ages help migrant youths in some cases, but by no means in all. Limited tracking on ability appears beneficial for migrants' relative achievement, while complete tracking and a large private school sector appear detrimental. Migrant students' achievement relative to their native-born peers suffers as educational spending and teachers' salaries increase, but is improved when examination is a component of the process for evaluating teachers. -- migrant youths ; PISA test scores ; schools ; institutions ; academic achievement
The long-term impact of international migration on economic decision-making evidence from a migration lottery and lab-in-the-field experiments by John Gibson( )

4 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We study how migration from a poor to a rich country affects key economic beliefs, preference parameters, and transnational household decision-making efficiency. Our setting is the migration of Tongans to New Zealand through a migration lottery program. In a ten-year follow-up survey of individuals applying for this program we elicit risk and time preferences and pro-market beliefs. We also link migrants and potential migrants to a partner household consisting of family members who would stay behind if they moved. We play lab-in-the-field games designed to measure the degree of intra-family trust and the efficiency of intra-family decision-making. Migration provides a large and permanent positive shock to income, a large change in economic institutions, and a reduction in interactions with partner household members. Despite these changes, we find no significant impacts of migration on risk and time preferences, pro-market beliefs, or in the decision-making efficiency of transnational households. This stability in the face of such a large and life-changing event lends credence to economic models of migration that treat these determinants of decision-making as time-invariant, and contrasts with recent evidence on preference changes after negative shocks
Immigration and innovation by David Christopher Maré( )

5 editions published in 2011 in English and German and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We combine firm-level innovation data with area-level Census data to examine the relationship between local workforce characteristics, especially the presence of immigrants and local skills, and the likelihood of innovation by firms. We examine a range of innovation outcomes, and test the relationship for selected subgroups of firms. We find a positive relationship between local workforce characteristics and average innovation outcomes in labour market areas, but this is accounted for by variation in firm characteristics such as firm size, industry, and research and development expenditure. Controlling for these influences, we find no systematic evidence of an independent link between local workforce characteristics and innovation
The importance of heterogeneity when examining immigrant education-occupation mismatch : evidence from New Zealand by Jacques Poot( )

6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many immigrants are overqualified in their first job after arrival in the host country. Education-occupation mismatch can affect the economic integration of immigrants and the returns to education and experience. The extent of this problem has been measured in recent years by means of micro level data in Australia, North America and Europe. However, these papers have typically ignored the importance of allowing for heterogeneity, in particular by qualification level and years in the destination country. In this paper, we use micro data from the 1996, 2001 and 2006 New Zealand censuses to examine differences between each migrants actual years of education and the estimated typical years of education in the narrowly defined occupation in which they work. We find that migrants living in New Zealand for less than 5 years are on average overeducated, while earlier migrants are on average undereducated. However, once accounting for heterogeneity, we find that both overeducated and undereducated migrants become, with increasing years of residence in New Zealand, more similar to comparable native born. Convergence from overeducation is stronger than from undereducation
Accounting for Selectivity and Duration-Dependent Heterogeneity When Estimating the Impact of Emigration on Incomes and Poverty in Sending Areas by Steven Stillman( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impacts of international emigration and remittances on incomes and poverty in sending areas are increasingly studied with household survey data. But comparing households with and without emigrants is complicated by a triple-selectivity problem: first, households self-select into emigration; second, in some emigrant households everyone moves while others leave members behind; and third, some emigrants choose to return to the origin country. Allowing for duration-dependent heterogeneity introduces a fourth form of selectivity -- one must now worry not just about whether households migrate, but also when they do so. This paper clearly sets out these selectivity issues and their implications for existing migration studies, and then addresses them by using survey data designed specifically to take advantage of a randomized lottery that determines which applicants to the over-subscribed Samoan Quota may immigrate to New Zealand. The analysis compares incomes and poverty rates among left behind members in households in Samoa that sent Samoan Quota emigrants with those for members of similar households that were unsuccessful in the lottery. Policy rules control who can accompany the principal migrant, providing an instrument to address the second selectivity problem, while differences among migrants in which year their ballot was selected allow for estimation of duration effects. The authors find that migration reduced poverty among former household members, but they also find suggestive evidence that this effect may be short-lived as both remittances and agricultural income are negatively related to the duration that the migrant has been abroad
The impact of immigration on the labour market outcomes of New Zealanders by David C Maré( Book )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The geographical mobility of Māori in New Zealand by Isabelle Sin( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper describes the geographical location and internal mobility of the Maori ethnic group in New Zealand between 1991 and 2001. It is often suggested that Maori are less mobile than other ethnic groups because of attachment to particular geographic locations. This paper compares the mobility of Maori in particular locations to the mobility of similar Europeans in those same locations
Emigration and the age profile of retirement among immigrants( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper analyzes the relationship between immigrants' retirement status and the prevalence of return migration from the host country to their country of origin. We develop a simple theoretical model to illustrate that under reasonable conditions the probability of return migration is maximized at retirement. Reduced-form models of retirement status which control for the rate of return migration are then estimated using unique data on emigration rates matched to individual-level data for Australia. We find that immigrants, particularly immigrant women, are more likely to be retired than are native-born men and women with the same demographic, human capital, and family characteristics. Moreover, within the immigrant population, there is a negative relationship between the propensity to be retired and the return migration rate of one's fellow countrymen, particularly amongst men. This link is strongest for those individuals who are at (or near) retirement age and among those with the highest cost of return migration. These results suggest that the fiscal pressures associated with aging immigrant populations vary substantially across origin countries. -- Retirement ; immigrants ; return migration ; emigration ; Australia
Settlement patterns and the geographic mobility of recent migrants to New Zealand by David C Maré( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What explains the wealth gap between immigrants and the New Zealand born? by John Gibson( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The response of consumption in Russian households to economic shocks by Steven Stillman( Book )

5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the extent to which consumption in Russian households responds to exogenous income shocks. During the time period studied in this paper (1994-1998), Russia experienced two major economic crises. Both featured extreme movements in the real ruble-dollar exchange rate. The price of oil, which is typically thought to have a strong effect on the Russian economy, was also quite volatile during this time period. This paper exploits these large changes in oil prices and exchange rates, as well as community-level variations in wage and pension arrears, to identify exogenous shocks to household income. Using representative panel data on urban households from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, I find that a household which experiences an exogenous shock of 10% of its total income changes both its food and total non-durable expenditure by 7-11%. Most evidence indicates that these shocks are transitory in nature and thus the traditional Life Cycle/Permanent Income Hypothesis model is firmly rejected as describing the behavior of Russian households. Additional results indicate that changes in household savings are negatively related to exogenous income shocks, with this relationship strongest for low wealth households. Only models of consumption which include precautionary savings motives can explain why poorer households both reduce their consumption and increase their savings in response to an exogenous decline in income
The labour market adjustment of immigrants in New Zealand by Steven Stillman( Book )

4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impact of immigration on the geographic mobility of New Zealanders by Steven Stillman( Book )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Where should I live? : the locational choices of Australians and New Zealanders by Mathias Sinning( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Can immigrants insure against shocks as well as the native-born? by Asadul Islam( )

3 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impact that an unforeseen event has on household welfare depends on the extent to which household members can take actions to mitigate the direct impact of the shock. In this paper, we use nine years of longitudinal data from the Household Income Labour Dynamics of Australia (HILDA) survey to examine the impact of job displacement and serious health problems on: individual labour supply and incomes, household incomes and food expenditure. We extend on the previous literature by examining whether mitigation strategies and their effectiveness differs for the native-born and immigrants. Immigrants make up nearly one-quarter of the Australian population and there are a number of reasons to suspect that they may be less able to mitigate adverse shocks than the native-born
Housing markets and migration : evidence from New Zealand( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The labour market adjustment of immigrants in New Zealand by Steven Stillman( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Steven Stillman economist (Libera Università di Bolzano)

Steven Stillman econoom

Steven Stillman Wirtschaftswissenschaftler/in (Tätig bei Motu Economic and Public Policy Research, Wellington, New Zealand; Tätig am am New Zealand Dep. of Labour, Wellington, New Zealand; Tätig am am Inst. zur Zukunft der Arbeit (IZA), Bonn, Germany; Tätig an d...)

Languages
English (74)

German (2)