WorldCat Identities

Nakashima, Ichiro

Overview
Works: 21 works in 23 publications in 2 languages and 45 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: B138.N52, 100
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ichiro Nakashima
Die intelligible Welt; drei philosophische Abbandlungen by Kitarō Nishida( Book )

3 editions published in 1943 in German and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oral history interview with Uto Uyeyama : November 5, 1988 ; December 13, 1988 ; January 18, 1989 by Ichiro Nakashima( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oral history interview with George Miyao : April 29 and May 3, 1993, Sacramento, California by George Miyao( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Oral history interview with Chiyo Yogi : February 1, 1990 by Chiyo Yogi( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Association of cognitive impairment with magnetic resonance imaging findings and social activities in patients with multiple sclerosis( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and social activity with cognitive function in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods The Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological tests (BRB‐N) was carried out in 184 Japanese patients with MS, and 163 controls matched for age, sex and education. MRI findings of cerebral, brainstem, and cerebellar lesions and social activities of MS patients were further examined. Results MS patients with higher numbers of cerebral lesions on MRI had lower scores in most BRB‐N tests. BRB‐N scores in the majority of tests were significantly lower in patients with brainstem and cerebellar lesions. Data from an analysis of variance model in which only the main effects of cerebral, brainstem and cerebellar lesions were hypothesized showed an association of cerebral lesions with decreased scores in all BRB‐N tests, except symbol digit modalities test (SDMT) and paced auditory serial addition test (PASAT). In contrast, cerebellar lesions were associated with decreased SDMT and PASAT scores. Patients categorized as "unemployed because of MS" had lower BRB‐N scores than other social activity groups. Lower SDMT scores had an effect on the "unemployed because of MS" group, whereas the Expanded Disability Status Scale had a significantly greater negative impact on patients in this social category. Conclusions Higher numbers of brain lesions on MRI could have an impact on cognitive function in patients with MS, and impairment of information processing appears significantly associated with cerebellar lesions. Cognitive impairment affects the employment status of patients with MS
Anti‐myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody in demyelinating diseases( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Anti‐myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody, which is specifically detected using a cell‐based assay (CBA), has been identified in various demyelinating diseases, including neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), acute idiopathic optic neuritis (ON), and pediatric multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis. Although its pathogenic role has not been established, antibody seropositive cases appear to share several characteristic features, such as a preferable response to steroid therapy and a good prognosis. Antibody detection at the onset of a demyelinating disease is important to predict the prognosis. Further analysis of the clinical features and investigation of the pathogenic roles of the antibody are required to establish the disease spectrum associated with the antibody. Although the associated diseases appear to have a relatively good prognosis, treatment recommendations are offered for patients with severe symptoms or frequent relapses
Patient with relapsing anti‐N‐methyl‐d‐aspartate receptor encephalitis and a family history of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : We report a rare case of an adult male with anti‐NMDAR encephalitis and multiple relapses whose mother had been diagnosed with typical sCJD
Boundary between multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders are often indistinguishable by their clinical features. Recently, anti‐myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody was found in the serum of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders patients without anti‐aquaporin‐4 antibody. This finding suggests a new category of central nervous system demyelinating diseases. However, even with the information provided by these serum antibody results, the diagnoses of some patients remain problematic. In the present article, two cases that appeared to be at the boundary between multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica are presented. The first case was a 57‐year‐old woman with past histories of rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. She developed myelitis after participating in a clinical trial of anti‐BAFF monoclonal antibody and discontinued it. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging showed findings typical of multiple sclerosis, and she was negative for anti‐aquaporin‐4 antibody. Her disease was stabilized after monthly cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. The second case was a 41‐year‐old woman who developed relapsing myelitis. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging showed a relatively long lesion. She had not developed brain lesions on routine magnetic resonance imaging for more than 5years. She was negative for anti‐aquaporin‐4 antibody, and oral prednisolone could not prevent her relapses. However after fingolimod administration, she became stable and Expanded Disability Status Scale gradually improved
Reversible paraspinal muscle hyperintensity in anti-MOG antibody–associated transverse myelitis( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Case of anti‐myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody‐associated demyelinating disease with atopic dermatitis( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Anti‐myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies occur in a small group of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. However, the clinical significance of this autoantibody has not been fully established. Case presentation: An 18‐year‐old woman with a history of depression and atopic disease developed left‐side dominant diffuse muscle weakness and numbness with bilateral ankle pseudoclonus along with deterioration of atopic dermatitis, which suggested the possibility of central nerve system damage, although there were no abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging. During hospitalization, her neurological symptoms naturally improved, so a wait‐and‐see approach was chosen. After discharge, she developed temporal blurred vision, and then a modest elevation in anti‐MOG antibodies (1:128) was observed. We subsequently diagnosed the patient with possible anti‐MOG antibody‐associated disease. After intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was started, her pseudoclonus and gait disturbance were improved. Conclusions: This case suggests that atopic dermatitis is possibly a trigger for developing anti‐MOG antibody‐associated disorder, and that some instances of possible central nerve system‐demyelinating disease associated with anti‐MOG antibodies could be poorly identifiable using magnetic resonance imaging. Anti‐MOG antibody test might be worthwhile when a patient develops neurological symptoms without apparent magnetic resonance imaging lesions. Abstract : We experienced a case of 18years old female with atopic dermatitis, anti‐myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody‐associated acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and without imaging abnormality. After 3days‐glucocorticoid therapy, anti‐MOG antibody turned to be negative
Prognosis and severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein‐immunoglobulinG‐related diseases( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein‐immunoglobulinG‐related demyelinating disease is part of a relatively new disease spectrum that differs from multiple sclerosis. A recent European study showed that adult onset myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein‐immunoglobulinG‐related demyelinating disease might have frequent relapses and a poor prognosis similar to anti‐aquaporin4 antibody‐positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders
Results of patient‐reported outcome in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis: Evaluation of the severity and progression of gait disability( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Objective To evaluate the degree of severity and disability progression in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using descriptive study methods. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent to patients through three Japanese MS patients' associations. Survey participants were asked to evaluate their disability and MS severity based on two scales: the Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) and the Short Form‐8 Health Survey. Results A total of 789 MS patients were surveyed. Approximately 45% of patients had gait disability (PDDS score of 3) or higher. Patients with a higher age of MS onset had rapid progression of disease. The mean duration from first symptom of MS to treatment initiation was 4.5years. The time to treatment initiation was longer for the younger onset group, ≤29years‐of‐age, than that of the older onset group, ≥40years‐of‐age (6.2years vs 2.2years, respectively). The PDDS showed two‐stage disability progression: while progression time to a PDDS score of 2 varied, progression time from a PDDS score of 2 to a score of 4 was similar across the participants. Conclusions Based on the patient‐reported disability progression of MS, we showed that the possibility of severity and MS disease progression between Japanese and Western countries might be similar. The PDDS could be a useful alternative to assess MS disability
Inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with nephrotic syndrome: Report of a case and review of the literature( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract An association between the acute or chronic form of inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (IDP) and nephrotic syndrome has occasionally been reported. However, the clinical pictures in IDP of these cases have attracted little attention to date. In the present report, we describe a 50‐year‐old man with IDP who developed quadriplegia with respiratory impairment followed by a remitting and relapsing course for several months with complete recovery, in which nephrotic syndrome appeared at the nadir and subsided in parallel with the neurological improvement. We also searched for the English‐language literature from 1946 to 2012 April and found 32 cases of Guillain–Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with nephrotic syndrome. We analyzed the 33 cases including the present case, and found such features as: (i) male preponderance (84.8%); (ii) motor dominant impairments with favorable final outcomes; and (iii) proteinuria occurring simultaneously with neurological symptoms and ameliorating along with neurological improvement in the majority of the cases. Available data of nerve conduction studies consistently showed demyelinating neuropathy. These findings suggest that IDP with nephrotic syndrome might be a distinctive clinical entity possibly caused by immune reactions to antigen(s) shared by peripheral nerves and the glomerulus. As nephrotic syndrome is asymptomatic or transient in some cases, IDP with nephrotic syndrome might be more prevalent than we think
Pregabalin attenuates dysautonomia as well as painful dysesthesia caused by Guillain–Barré syndrome( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Congress report of the 9th Pan‐Asian Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chaos theory for clinical manifestations in multiple sclerosis( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease which characteristically shows repeated relapses and remissions irregularly in the central nervous system. At present, the pathological mechanism of MS is unknown and we do not have any theories or mathematical models to explain its disseminated patterns in time and space. In this paper, we present a new theoretical model from a viewpoint of complex system with chaos model to reproduce and explain the non-linear clinical and pathological manifestations in MS. First, we adopted a discrete logistic equation with non-linear dynamics to prepare a scalar quantity for the strength of pathogenic factor at a specific location of the central nervous system at a specific time to reflect the negative feedback in immunity. Then, we set distinct minimum thresholds in the above-mentioned scalar quantity for demyelination possibly causing clinical relapses and for cerebral atrophy. With this simple model, we could theoretically reproduce all the subtypes of relapsing-remitting MS, primary progressive MS, and secondary progressive MS. With the sensitivity to initial conditions and sensitivity to minute change in parameters of the chaos theory, we could also reproduce the spatial dissemination. Such chaotic behavior could be reproduced with other similar upward-convex functions with appropriate set of initial conditions and parameters. In conclusion, by applying chaos theory to the three-dimensional scalar field of the central nervous system, we can reproduce the non-linear outcome of the clinical course and explain the unsolved disseminations in time and space of the MS patients
Severe demyelination but no astrocytopathy in clinically definite neuromyelitis optica with anti-myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We report a patient with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) presenting anti-myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-seropositive, in whom biomarkers of demyelination and astrocyte damage were measured during an acute attack. A 31-year-old man developed right optic neuritis followed by longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, fulfilling the criteria for definite NMO. He was anti-MOG-seropositive and anti-aquaporin-4 seronegative. The myelin basic protein level was markedly elevated whereas glial fibrillary acidic protein was not detectable in cerebrospinal fluid during an acute attack. His symptoms quickly improved after high-dose methylprednisolone therapy. This case suggests that NMO patients with anti-MOG may have severe demyelination in the absence of astrocyte injury
Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein immunoglobulin G‐associated disease: An overview( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is localized at the outermost layer of the myelin sheath and is accessible for autoantibodies. Although experimental autoimmune encephalitis induced with MOG immunization has been studied for 30years, the results of previous reports on MOG immunoglobulin G (IgG) detection with enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot are confusing. However, after the development of human MOG‐transfected cell‐based assay to detect conformational‐sensitive MOG‐IgG, unique groups of patients have been found seropositive, and MOG‐IgG‐associated disease has become a hot topic in clinical neuroimmunology. Currently, the clinical spectrum of MOG‐IgG‐associated disease includes idiopathic optic neuritis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, encephalitides (brainstem and cerebral cortical), idiopathic myelitis, atypical multiple sclerosis, aquaporin‐4 IgG‐negative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders and others. MOG‐IgG‐associated disease occurs in both children and adults, and the female:male ratio is almost 1:1. Pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluids during acute exacerbation is often seen, but oligoclonal IgG bands are usually negative. T helper cell 17, B cells and neutrophil‐related cytokines appear to be upregulated intrathecally. The pathology of acute lesions is characterized by active inflammation demyelination with deposition of immunoglobulins and complements. Just like aquaporin 4 IgG‐positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, some disease‐modifying drugs for multiple sclerosis seem to be inefficacious in MOG‐IgG‐associated disease, and chronic immunosuppression is required to prevent relapse, especially in patients persistently positive for MOG‐IgG. Our understanding of this newly recognized disease remains insufficient, and the progress of research is much expected
 
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Languages
English (19)

German (3)