WorldCat Identities

Habre, Walid

Overview
Works: 14 works in 14 publications in 2 languages and 47 library holdings
Roles: Contributor, Author, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Walid Habre
Anesthésie sur terrains pédiatriques à risques by Bernard J Dalens( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in French and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cardiorespiratory effects of recruitment maneuvers and positive end expiratory pressure in an experimental context of acute lung injury and pulmonary hypertension by Camille Doras( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lung volume assessments in normal and surfactant depleted lungs: agreement between bedside techniques and CT imaging by Gergely Albu( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prevention of airway hyperresponsiveness induced by left ventricular dysfunction in rats by Ferenc Peták( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prevention of bronchial hyperreactivity in a rat model of precapillary pulmonary hypertension by Walid Habre( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Optimal crystalloid volume ratio for blood replacement for maintaining hemodynamic stability and lung function: an experimental randomized controlled study by Gergely H Fodor( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prevention of hyperoxia-induced bronchial hyperreactivity by sildenafil and vasoactive intestinal peptide: impact of preserved lung function and structure by Dorottya Czövek( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The role of endothelin-1 in hyperoxia-induced lung injury in mice by Walid Habre( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effect of PEEP and I:E ratio on cerebral oxygenation in ARDS: an experimental study in anesthetized rabbit by Federica Lovisari( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pressure-regulated volume control vs. volume control ventilation in healthy and injured rabbit lung( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : BACKGROUND: It is not well understood how different ventilation modes affect the regional distribution of ventilation, particularly within the injured lung. OBJECTIVES: We compared respiratory mechanics, lung aeration and regional specific ventilation ( ) distributions in healthy and surfactant-depleted rabbits ventilated with pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) mode with a decelerating inspiratory flow or with volume control (VC) mode. DESIGN: Randomised experimental study. ANIMALS AND INTERVENTIONS: New Zealand white rabbits ( n = 8) were anaesthetised, paralysed and mechanically ventilated either with VC or PRVC mode (tidal volume: 7 ml kg −1 ; rate: 40 min −1 ; positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP): 3 cmH2 O), at baseline and after lung injury induced by lung lavage. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Airway resistance (Raw), respiratory tissue damping (G) and elastance (H) were measured by low-frequency forced oscillations. Synchrotron radiation computed tomography during stable xenon wash-in was used to measure regional lung aeration and specific ventilation and the relative fraction of nonaerated, trapped, normally, poorly and hyperinflated lung regions. RESULTS: Lung lavage significantly elevated peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) ( P < 0.001). PIP was lower on PRVC compared with VC mode (−12.7 ± 1.7%, P < 0.001). No significant differences in respiratory mechanics, regional ventilation distribution, strain or blood oxygenation could be detected between the two ventilation modes. CONCLUSION: A decelerating flow pattern (PRVC) resulted in equivalent regional ventilation distribution, respiratory mechanics and gas exchange, in both normal and mechanically heterogeneous lungs with, however, a significantly lower peak pressure. Our data suggest that the lower PIP on PRVC ventilation was because of the decelerating flow pattern rather than the ventilation distribution
Anesthésie pédiatrique by Bernard J Dalens( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Assessing anaesthesia practice in the vulnerable age group: NECTARINE( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Assessing anaesthesia practice in the vulnerable age group( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Fluid replacement and respiratory function( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : BACKGROUND: Fluid replacement with blood products, colloids and crystalloids is associated with morbidity and mortality. Despite this, the consequences of fluid administration on airway and respiratory tissue properties are not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: Comparison of respiratory effects of fluid replacement with autologous blood (Group B), colloid (HES 6% 130/0.4, Group CO) or crystalloid solution (NaCl 0.9%, Group CR) after haemorrhage with separate assessments of airway resistance and respiratory tissue mechanics. DESIGN: A randomised study. SETTING: An experimental model of surgical haemorrhage and fluid replacement in rats. PARTICIPANTS: Anaesthetised, ventilated rats randomly allocated into three groups (Group B: n = 8, Group CO: n = 8, Group CR: n = 9). INTERVENTION: Animals were bled in six sequential steps, each manoeuvre targeting a loss of 5% of total blood volume. The blood loss was then replaced stepwise in a 1 : 1 ratio with one of the three fluids. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: After each step, airway resistance (Raw), tissue damping and elastance (H) were determined by forced oscillations. Oedema indices from lung weights and histology were also measured. RESULTS: Raw (mean ± SD) decreased in all groups following blood loss (−20.3 ± 9.5% vs. baseline, P < 0.05), and remained low following blood replacement (−21.7 ± 14.5% vs. baseline, P < 0.05), but was normalised by colloid (5.5 ± 10.7%, NS). Crystalloid administration exhibited an intermediate reversal effect (−8.4 ± 14.7%, NS). Tissue viscoelasticity increased following both blood loss and replacement, with no evidence of a significant difference in H between Groups CO and CR. More severe oedema was observed in Groups CR and CO than in Group B ( P < 0.05), with no difference between the colloid and crystalloid solutions. CONCLUSION: This model, which mimics surgical haemorrhage, yields no evidence of a difference between colloids and crystalloids with regard to the pulmonary consequences of blood volume restoration. Functional changes in the lung should not be a key concern when choosing fluid replacement therapy with these solutions
 
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English (12)

French (2)