WorldCat Identities

Stillman, Steven

Overview
Works: 20 works in 39 publications in 3 languages and 240 library holdings
Roles: Author, Contributor
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 304.82
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Steven Stillman
Migration and mental health : evidence from a natural experiment by Steven Stillman( )

12 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and held by 140 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

People migrate to improve their well-being, whether through an expansion of economic and social opportunities or a reduction in persecution. Yet a large literature suggests that migration can be a stressful process, with potentially negative impacts on mental health, reducing the net benefits of migration. However, to truly understand the effect of migration on mental health one must compare the mental health of migrants to what their mental health would have been had they stayed in their home country. The existing literature is not able to do this and typically settles for comparing the mental health of migrants to that of natives in the destination country, which takes no account of any preexisting differences between these groups. This paper overcomes the selection problems afffecting previous studies of the effect of migration on mental health by examining a migrant lottery program. New Zealand allows a quota of Tongans to immigrate each year with a lottery used to choose amony the excess number of applicants. A unique survey conducted by the authors in these two countries allows experimental estimates of mental health of migrants who were successful applicants in the lottery to the mental health of those who applied to migrate under the quota, but whose names were not drawn in the lottery. Migration is found to lead to improvements in mental health, particularly for women and those with poor mental health in their home country
Youth minimum wage reform and the labour market by Dean Robert Hyslop( )

2 editions published in 2004 in German and English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effect of economic crises on nutritional status : evidence from Russia by Steven Stillman( )

2 editions published in 2004 in German and English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The long-run impact of New Zealand's structural reform on local communities by Steven Stillman( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economic liberalisation and the mobility of minority groups : evidence from Māori in New Zealand by Isabelle Sin( Book )

4 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Between 1984 and 2003, New Zealand undertook comprehensive market-oriented economic reforms. In this paper, we use Census data to examine how the internal mobility of Maori compares to that of Europeans in New Zealand in the period after these reforms. It is often suggested that Maori are less mobile than other ethnic groups because of attachment to particular geographical locations. If this were the case, Maori may have been disadvantaged in the post-reform period because they were more likely to be living in adversely affected areas and less likely to move to pursue better employment opportunities. In contrast to the anecdotal evidence, we find that Maori are more mobile on average than similar Europeans. However, Maori who live in areas with strong networks of their iwi are slightly less mobile than Europeans. The difference between Maori who live locally to their iwi and those who do not is even more pronounced when we consider responsiveness to local labour market shocks. Non-local Maori are considerably more responsive to changes in economic opportunities than are Europeans, whereas local Maori are almost entirely unresponsive."--Author abstract
The labour market adjustment of immigrants in New Zealand by Steven Stillman( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sérénade (Trio en ré) pour violon, alto & violoncelle by S Stillman( )

1 edition published in 1927 and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How important is selection? : experimental vs non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration by David McKenzie( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Land of Milk and Honey with Streets Paved with Gold Do Emigrants Have Over-Optimistic Expectations about Incomes Abroad? by David McKenzie( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Millions of people emigrate every year in search of better economic and social opportunities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that emigrants may have over-optimistic expectations about the incomes they can earn abroad, resulting in excessive migration pressure, and in disappointment among those who do migrate. Yet there is almost no statistical evidence on how accurately these emigrants predict the incomes that they will earn working abroad. In this paper the authors combine a natural emigration experiment with unique survey data on would-be emigrants' probabilistic expectations about employment and incomes in the migration destination. Their procedure enables them to obtain moments and quantiles of the subjective distribution of expected earnings in the destination country. The authors find a significant underestimation of both unconditional and conditional labor earnings at all points in the distribution. This underestimation appears driven in part by potential migrants placing too much weight on the negative employment experiences of some migrants, and by inaccurate information flows from extended family, who may be trying to moderate remittance demands by understating incomes
How Important is Selection? Experimental versus Non-Experimental Measures of the Income Gains from Migration by David McKenzie( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Measuring the gain in income from migration is complicated by non-random selection of migrants from the general population, making it difficult to obtain an appropriate comparison group of non-migrants. This paper uses a migrant lottery to overcome this problem, providing an experimental measure of the income gains from migration. New Zealand allows a quota of Tongans to immigrate each year with a lottery to choose among the excess number of applicants. A unique survey conducted by the authors in these two countries allows experimental estimates of the income gains from migration by comparing the incomes of migrants to those who applied to migrate, but whose names were not drawn in the lottery, after allowing for the effect of non-compliance among some of those whose names were drawn. The authors also conducted a survey of individuals who did not apply for the lottery. Comparing this non-applicant group with the migrants enables assessment of the degree to which non-experimental methods can provide an unbiased estimate of the income gains from migration. They find evidence of migrants being positively selected in terms of both observed and unobserved skills. As a result, non-experimental methods are found to overstate the gains from migration, by 9 to 82 percent. A good instrumental variable works best, while difference-in-differences and bias-adjusted propensity-score matching also perform comparatively well
Sérénade (trio en ré) pour violino, viola & violoncello by S Stillman( )

2 editions published in 1927 and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Development of a 0.5° global monthly raining day product from 1901 to 2010( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: While several long-term global data sets of monthly precipitation amount (P) are widely available, only the Climate Research Unit (CRU) provides long-term global monthly raining day number (N) data (i.e., daily precipitation frequency in a month), with P / N representing the daily precipitation intensity. However, because CRU N is based on a limited number of gauges, it is found to perform poorly over data sparse regions. By combining the CRU method with a short-term gauge-satellite merged global daily precipitation data set (Climate Prediction Center morphing technique) and a global long-term monthly precipitation data set (Global Precipitation Climatology Centre) with far more gauges than used in CRU, a new 0.5° global N data set from 1901 to 2010 is developed, which differs significantly from CRU N . Compared with three independent regional daily precipitation products over the U.S., China, and South America based on much denser gauge networks than used in CRU, the new product shows significant improvement over CRU N . Key Points: Number of raining days per month (N) is needed for characterizing intensity and frequency of daily precipitation The only long-term global N data set (CRU) performs poorly over data sparse regions Our new global N data set shows a large improvement over the CRU product based on three regional data sets
How important is selection? : experimental vs. non-experimental measures of the income gains from migration by David McKenzie( Recording )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Measuring the gain in income from migration is complicated by non-random selection of migrants from the general population, making it hard to obtain an appropriate comparison group of non-migrants. This paper uses a migrant lottery to overcome this problem, providing an experimental measure of the income gains from migration. New Zealand allows a quota of Tongans to immigrate each year with a lottery used to choose amongst the excess number of applicants. A unique survey conducted by the authors in these two countries allows experimental estimates of the income gains from migration to be obtained by comparing the incomes of migrants to those who applied to migrate, but whose names were not drawn in the lottery, after allowing for the effect of noncompliance among some of those whose names were drawn. We also conducted a survey of individuals who did not apply for the lottery. Comparing this non-applicant group to the migrants enables assessment of the degree to which non-experimental methods can provide an unbiased estimate of the income gains from migration. We find evidence of migrants being positively selected in terms of both observed and unobserved skills. As a result, non-experimental methods are found to overstate the gains from migration, by 9 to 82 percent. A good instrumental variable works best, while difference-in-differences and bias-adjusted propensity-score matching also perform comparatively well"--Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit web site
Youth minimum wage reform and the labour market by Dean Robert Hyslop( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Accounting for selectivity and duration-dependent heterogeneity when estimating the impact of emigration on incomes and poverty in sending areas by John Gibson( Recording )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The impacts of international migration on remaining household members : omnibus results from a migration lottery program by John Gibson( Recording )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Accounting for Selectivity and Duration-Dependent Heterogeneity When Estimating the Impact of Emigration on Incomes and Poverty in Sending Areas by Steven Stillman( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The impacts of international emigration and remittances on incomes and poverty in sending areas are increasingly studied with household survey data. But comparing households with and without emigrants is complicated by a triple-selectivity problem: first, households self-select into emigration; second, in some emigrant households everyone moves while others leave members behind; and third, some emigrants choose to return to the origin country. Allowing for duration-dependent heterogeneity introduces a fourth form of selectivity -- one must now worry not just about whether households migrate, but also when they do so. This paper clearly sets out these selectivity issues and their implications for existing migration studies, and then addresses them by using survey data designed specifically to take advantage of a randomized lottery that determines which applicants to the over-subscribed Samoan Quota may immigrate to New Zealand. The analysis compares incomes and poverty rates among left behind members in households in Samoa that sent Samoan Quota emigrants with those for members of similar households that were unsuccessful in the lottery. Policy rules control who can accompany the principal migrant, providing an instrument to address the second selectivity problem, while differences among migrants in which year their ballot was selected allow for estimation of duration effects. The authors find that migration reduced poverty among former household members, but they also find suggestive evidence that this effect may be short-lived as both remittances and agricultural income are negatively related to the duration that the migrant has been abroad
A land of milk and honey with streets paved with gold : do emigrants have over-optimistic expectations about incomes abroad? by David McKenzie( Recording )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Serenade (trio en re) pour violino, alto, violoncello by S Stillman( Book )

1 edition published in 1927 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Migration and mental health : evidence from a natural experiment by Steven Stillman( Recording )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.77 (from 0.39 for Accounting ... to 0.92 for A Land of ...)

Languages
English (33)

German (2)

French (1)