WorldCat Identities

Donker, Tara

Overview
Works: 16 works in 18 publications in 2 languages and 37 library holdings
Roles: Author, Contributor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Tara Donker
Handboek online hulpverlening : met internet Zorg en Welzijn verbeteren by Frank Schalken( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in Dutch and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Deze onderwijseditie bevat de delen Oriëntatie en Uitvoering Het Handboek online hulpverlening is geschreven op basis van ruim tien jaar ervaring met online hulpverlening en bevat alle relevante aspecten van het vakgebied. Deze geheel vernieuwde en voordelige editie beschrijft alle nieuwe ontwikkelingen en actuele inzichten omtrent wetenschappelijk onderzoek, blended hulpverlening, mHealth, therapietrouw, leerstijlen én de zeven kenmerken van een competente online hulpverlener. Deze Onderwijseditie bestaat uit: Deel I Oriëntatie Deel II Uitvoering Toegankelijkheid, kwaliteit en gebruikersgemak verbeteren, regie en zelfredzaamheid stimuleren en kosten besparen: hulpverlening via internet verbetert hulp bij psychische, sociale of maatschappelijke problemen. Steeds meer organisaties bieden dan ook online hulp. Wat maakt hulpverlening via internet zo waardevol? Wat is nodig voordat een instelling online hulp (grootschalig) kan aanbieden? Het Handboek online hulpverlening (onderwijseditie) is tot stand gekomen op basis van meer dan tien jaar ervaring met online hulpverlening en bevat alle relevante aspecten van dit vakgebied. Deze geheel vernieuwde editie beschrijft alle nieuwe ontwikkelingen en actuele inzichten omtrent wetenschappelijk onderzoek, blended hulpverlening, mHealth, therapietrouw, leerstijlen én de zeven kenmerken van een competente online hulpverlener. Naast een uitgebreide beschrijving van de methodiek komen de kenmerken, voor- en nadelen en verschillende online hulpvormen aan bod. Door het hele boek heen staan voorbeelden van bestaande onlineen blended interventies. Dit handboek is zowel geschikt voor studenten die zich oriënteren op online hulpverlening als voor onderwijsinstellingen die hun online hulp aanbod willen uitbreiden of verbeteren. Dit handboek is zowel geschikt voor hulpverleners die zich oriënteren op het aanbieden van online hulp als voor onderwijsinstellingen die hun online hulpaanbod willen uitbreiden of verbeteren
Low-intensity screening and treatment for common mental disorders by T Donker( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Addressing missing data in randomized clinical trials: a causal inference perspective by Ilja Cornelisz( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Background<br>The importance of randomization in clinical trials has long been acknowledged for avoiding selection bias. Yet, bias concerns re-emerge with selective attrition. This study takes a causal inference perspective in addressing distinct scenarios of missing outcome data (MCAR, MAR and MNAR).<br><br>Methods<br>This study adopts a causal inference perspective in providing an overview of empirical strategies to estimate the average treatment effect, improve precision of the estimator, and to test whether the underlying identifying assumptions hold. We propose to use Random Forest Lee Bounds (RFLB) to address selective attrition and to obtain more precise average treatment effect intervals.<br><br>Results<br>When assuming MCAR or MAR, the often untenable identifying assumptions with respect to causal inference can hardly be verified empirically. Instead, missing outcome data in clinical trials should be considered as potentially non-random unobserved events (i.e. MNAR). Using simulated attrition data, we show how average treatment effect intervals can be tightened considerably using RFLB, by exploiting both continuous and discrete attrition predictor variables.<br><br>Conclusions<br>Bounding approaches should be used to acknowledge selective attrition in randomized clinical trials in acknowledging the resulting uncertainty with respect to causal inference. As such, Random Forest Lee Bounds estimates are more informative than point estimates obtained assuming MCAR or MAR
Consensus statement on the problem of terminology in psychological interventions using the internet or digital components by Ewelina Smoktunowicz( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Since the emergence of psychological interventions delivered via the Internet they have differed in numerous ways. The wealth of formats, methods, and technological solutions has led to increased availability and cost-effectiveness of clinical care, however, it has simultaneously generated a multitude of terms. With this paper, we first aim to establish whether a terminology issue exists in the field of Internet-delivered psychological interventions. If so, we aim to determine its implications for research, education, and practice. Furthermore, we intend to discuss solutions to mitigate the problem; in particular, we propose the concept of a common glossary. We invited 23 experts in the field of Internet-delivered interventions to respond to four questions, and employed the Delphi method to facilitate a discussion. We found that experts overwhelmingly agreed that there were terminological challenges, and that it had significant consequences for conducting research, treating patients, educating students, and informing the general public about Internet-delivered interventions. A cautious agreement has been reached that formulating a common glossary would be beneficial for the field to address the terminology issue. We end with recommendations for the possible formats of the glossary and means to disseminate it in a way that maximizes the probability of broad acceptance for a variety of stakeholders
INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY BASED INTERVENTIONS FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF COMMON MENTAL DISORDERS by Tara Donker( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A systematic review of psychosocial suicide prevention interventions for youth by Alison L Calear( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and psychological distress: a meta-analysis by Tara Donker( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Implementation of Internet-based preventive interventions for depression and anxiety: role of support? The design of a randomized controlled trial by Tara Donker( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cost-effectiveness of blended vs. face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy for severe anxiety disorders: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial by Geke Romijn( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Psychosocial interventions for suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts: A database of randomised controlled trials by Helen Christensen( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Trial for the Prevention of Depression (TriPoD) in final-year secondary students: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial by Yael Perry( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Suicide prevention in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and psychosis: a systematic review by Tara Donker( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Analysis of usage data from a self-guided app-based virtual reality cognitive behavior therapy for acrophobia: a randomized controlled trial by Tara Donker( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: This study examined user engagement with ZeroPhobia, a self-guided app-based virtual reality (VR) Cognitive Behavior Therapy for acrophobia symptoms using cardboard VR viewers. Dutch acrophobic adults (n = 96) completed assessments at baseline and immediately following treatment. Primary outcome measures were the Acrophobia Questionnaire (AQ) and the Igroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ). Usage data consisted of number of VR sessions practiced, practice time, and fear ratings directly after practicing. Results show that of the 66 participants who played at least one level, the majority continued to finish all levels, spending on average 24.4 min in VR. Self-reported fear consistently decreased between the start and finish of levels. Post-test AQ scores depended quadratically on time spent in VR. Higher pre-test AQ scores were significantly associated with subjective anxiety after the first level and a reduction of post-test AQ scores, but not with number of sessions, suggesting it might be more beneficial to play one level for a longer time period instead of practicing many VR levels. Results also show an optimum exposure level at which increasing practice time does not result in increased benefit. Self-guided VR acrophobia treatment is effective and leads to consistent reductions in self-reported anxiety both between levels and after treatment. Most participants progressed effectively to the highest self-exposure level, despite the absence of a therapist
Effectiveness of a psycho-educational intervention for expecting parents to prevent postpartum parenting stress, depression and anxiety: a randomized controlled trial by Marjolein Missler( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Self-Guided Psychological Treatment for Depressive Symptoms: A Meta-Analysis by Pim Cuijpers( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background: A number of trials have examined the effects of self-guided psychological intervention, without any contact between the participants and a therapist or coach. The results and sizes of these trials have been mixed. This is the first quantitative meta-analysis, aimed at organizing and evaluating the literature, and estimating effect size. Method: We conducted systematic literature searches in PubMed, PsycINFO and Embase up to January 2010, and identified additional studies through earlier meta-analyses, and the references of included studies. We identified seven randomized controlled trials that met our inclusion criteria, with a total of 1,362 respondents. The overall quality of the studies was high. A post-hoc power calculation showed that the studies had sufficient statistical power to detect an effect size of d = 0.19. Results: The overall mean effect size indicating the difference between self-guided psychological treatment and control groups at post-test was d = 0.28 (pless than0.001), which corresponds to a NNT of 6.41. At 4 to 12 months follow-up the effect size was d = 0.23. There was no indication for significant publication bias. Conclusions: We found evidence that self-guided psychological treatment has a small but significant effect on participants with increased levels of depressive symptomatology
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Handboek online hulpverlening : met internet Zorg en Welzijn verbeteren
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Alternative Names
Donker, Tara

Languages
English (16)

Dutch (2)