WorldCat Identities

Hans R.A., Koster

Overview
Works: 33 works in 44 publications in 2 languages and 81 library holdings
Roles: Author, Contributor, htt, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Koster Hans R.A.
Seeing the City : Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Study of the Urban( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The city is a complex object. Some researchers look at its shape, others at its people, animals, ecology, policy, infrastructures, buildings, history, art, or technical networks. Some researchers analyse processes of in- or exclusion, gentrification, or social mobility; others biological evolution, traffic flows, or spatial development. Many combine these topics or add still more topics beyond this list. Some projects cross the boundaries of research and practice and engage in action research, while others pursue knowledge for the sake of curiosity. This volume embraces this variety of perspectives and provides an essential collection of methodologies for studying the city from multiple, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary perspectives. We start by recognizing that the complexity of the urban environment cannot be understood from a single vantage point. We therefore offer multiple methodologies in order to gather and analyse data about the city, and provide ways to connect and integrate these approaches. The contributors form a talented network of urban scholars and practitioners at the forefront of their fields. They offer hands-on methodological techniques and skills for data collection and analysis. Furthermore, they reveal honest and insightful reflections from behind the scenes. All methodologies are illustrated with examples drawn from the authors own research applying them in the city of Amsterdam. In this way, the volume also offers a rich collection of Amsterdam-based research and outcomes that may inform local urban practitioners and policy makers. Altogether, the volume offers indispensable tools for and aims to educate a new generation of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary-minded urban scholars and practitioners
Seeing the city : interdisciplinary perspectives on the study of the urban by Nanke Verloo( )

1 edition published in 2021 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The city is a complex object. Some researchers look at its shape, others at its people, animals, ecology, policy, infrastructures, buildings, history, art, or technical networks. Some researchers analyse processes of in- or exclusion, gentrification, or social mobility; others biological evolution, traffic flows, or spatial development. Many combine these topics or add still more topics beyond this list. Some projects cross the boundaries of research and practice and engage in action research, while others pursue knowledge for the sake of curiosity. This volume embraces this variety of perspectives and provides an essential collection of methodologies for studying the city from multiple, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary perspectives. We start by recognizing that the complexity of the urban environment cannot be understood from a single vantage point. We therefore offer multiple methodologies in order to gather and analyse data about the city, and provide ways to connect and integrate these approaches. The contributors form a talented network of urban scholars and practitioners at the forefront of their fields. They offer hands-on methodological techniques and skills for data collection and analysis. Furthermore, they reveal honest and insightful reflections from behind the scenes. All methodologies are illustrated with examples drawn from the authors own research applying them in the city of Amsterdam. In this way, the volume also offers a rich collection of Amsterdam-based research and outcomes that may inform local urban practitioners and policy makers. Altogether, the volume offers indispensable tools for and aims to educate a new generation of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary-minded urban scholars and practitioners
The impact of mixed land use on residential property values by Hans R.A Koster( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contemporary European urban planning policies aim to mix land uses in compact neighbourhoods. It is presumed that mixing land uses yields socio-economic benefits and therefore has a positive effect on housing values. In this paper, we investigate the impact of mixed land use on housing values using semiparametric estimation techniques. We demonstrate that a diverse neighbourhood is positively valued by households. There are various land use types which positively affect house prices, e.g. business services and leisure. Land uses that are incompatible with residential land use are, among others, manufacturing and wholesale. It appears that households are willing to pay up to 6 percent more for a house in a mixed neighbourhood than for an otherwise comparable house in a monofunctional area. We also show that there is substantial heterogeneity in willingness to pay for mixed land use. For example, apartment occupiers are willing to pay almost 25 percent more for diversity than households living in detached housing
Amenities and the social structure of cities by Carl Gaigné( Book )

2 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We develop a new model of a "featureful" city in which locations are differentiated by two attributes, that is, the distance to employment centers and the accessibility to given amenities, and we show how heterogeneous households in income are sorted out across the urban space. Under Stone-Geary preferences, the spatial income distribution is governed by a location-quality index which reflects the interaction between the amenity and commuting cost functions. The residential equilibrium typically involves the spatial separation of households sharing similar incomes. Using data on Dutch cities, we show that there is a causal relationship between the amenity level and consumer income, suggesting that richer households sort themselves into high amenity locations. We do not find strong evidence that employment accessibility leads to income segregation, suggesting that the standard monocentric city model without amenities is a poor predictor of the social structure of cities
Estimating the benefits of improved rail access; geographical range and anticipation effects by Hans R. A Koster( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Estimating firms' demand for agglomeration by Hans R.A Koster( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Knooppuntontwikkeling in Nederland : (hoe) moeten we Transit-Oriented Development implementeren?( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in Dutch and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The internal structure of cities : the economics of agglomeration, amenities and accessibility by Hans Robert Aernout Koster( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rocketing rents the magnitude and attenuation of agglomeration economies in the commercial property market by Hans Koster( )

2 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper I measure the impact of urbanisation and localisation economies on commercial rents (offices and industrial buildings) using unique micro-data on both commercial property transactions, as well as all firm (establishment) locations. I add to the literature in three important ways. First, I use measures of urbanisation and localisation that are continuous over space to overcome the modifiable areal unit problem. More specifically, I estimate kernel employment densities that are continuous over space. Second, to distinguish agglomeration economies from unobserved endowments, I include postcode fixed effects (about the size of a census block) and use temporal variation in densities to measure the impact of urbanisation and localisation economies on commercial property values, assuming that unobserved endowments are time-invariant. To relax the latter assumption I also test robustness by including time-variant endowments (e.g. new station openings, changes in land use) and region-year fixed effects. This is arguably preferable over standard IV approaches using on long-lagged instruments, which may be invalid. Third, I determine the spatial extent of agglomeration economies. Using a cross-validation procedure, the spatial decay parameter is estimated within the model. The results show that urbanisation economies, rather than localisation economies, have a considerable impact on rents: a standard deviation increase in employment density leads to an increase in rents of about 10 percent. This effect is larger in magnitude than estimates of agglomeration economies using wages, suggesting that agglomeration economies mainly capitalise in rents. The geographical extent of these benefits is about 15 kilometres and very robust across different specifications. So, urbanisation economies seem to mainly take place at a city or municipality-level, rather than at a more aggregate level. I furthermore show that the bias of ignoring unobserved endowments seems to be rather small
Renewable energy and negative externalities the effect of wind turbines on house prices by Martijn I Droes( )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In many countries, wind turbines are constructed as part of a strategy to reduce fossil fuel dependence. In this paper, we measure the external effect of wind turbines on the transaction prices of nearby properties. Using a unique transaction price dataset covering the period 1985-2011 and the exact location of all wind turbines built in the Netherlands, we find that property prices within a 2 km radius of a wind turbine, after it has been constructed, are on average 1.4 percent lower than property prices in comparable neighborhoods. We provide further evidence that the external costs of wind turbines are at least 10 percent of construction costs
Historic amenities, income and sorting of Households by Hans R. A Koster( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Commuters' preferences for fast and reliable travel by Paul Köster( )

2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Traffic congestion contributes to longer travel times and increased travel time variability. We account for the dynamic nature of travellers' choices, by deriving a closed-form solution for the costs of travel time variability. The resulting travel delay cost function is linear in the mean travel delay. Then, we use a semiparametric estimation approach to analyse observed and unobserved heterogeneity in the value of travel time and reliability. Using data from a stated choice experiment, we show that there is substantial heterogeneity in the willingness to pay for fast and reliable travel. About 5-25 percent of the heterogeneity in the value of time and reliability is attributable to observed characteristics of individuals, implying that unobserved heterogeneity is much more important than heterogeneity related to observable characteristics. It is furthermore shown that schedule delay costs are on average 24 percent of the total costs of travel delays
Shopping externalities and retail concentration: Evidence from Dutch shopping streets by Hans R. A. Koster( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Congestible goods and hoarding a test based on students' use of university computers( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A world divided refugee centers, house prices, and household preferences by Martijn Dröes( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The number of refugees around the world has increased substantially in the last decade. To cope with refugee flows, many countries have built refugee centers (RCs) for refugees to await the outcome of their asylum procedure. The opening of such centers often leads to considerable opposition from the local population. Using detailed housing transactions data from the Netherlands over the period 1990-2015, we examine locals' attitudes towards immigration by investigating households' willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid living near RCs. Comparing the price developments of opened RCs and those that are planned, we show that the opening of an RC decreases house prices within 2km by 3-6%. Using micro-data on home buyers' characteristics and employing a non-parametric hedonic pricing method, we identify households' individual preferences. We show that attitudes of higher income households towards RCs tend to be more negative, while those of foreign-born households are more positive. The WTP is also more negative for larger RCs. These results imply that when opening RCs, it is advisable to keep them relatively small and locate them in more ethnically diverse areas
Estimating firms' demand for agglomeration by Hans Koster( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The market for commercial properties is characterised by extreme heterogeneity in demand. In this paper, we aim to gain more insight in the heterogeneity in demand for employment agglomeration and size of the rental property using a two-stage hedonic approach following Bajari and Benkard (2005). We use unique micro-data of properties' attributes as well as of firm characteristics. Given assumptions on the functional form of the production function, we identify firm-specific parameters using a nonparametric control function approach that corrects for endogeneity. The results show that agglomeration benefits are capitalised in rents: a one standard deviation increase in agglomeration leads to an increase in the annual rents of about 6 percent. It is found that larger and business services firms are willing to pay (substantially) more for agglomeration. Furthermore, for office buildings a 10 percent increase in number of employees increases the marginal willingness to pay for floor space with 8 percent, which suggests that internal returns to scale are present
Car ownership and residential parking subsidies evidence from Amsterdam by Jesper de Groote( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Many cities around the world have introduced paid parking but implicitly subsidize parking for example by providing residential parking permits for street parking. We study the welfare effects of residential parking subsidies through changes in car ownership for Amsterdam. We employ a boundary-discontinuity design that exploits spatial variation in the length of waiting lists for permits and therefore in the size of the parking subsidy. In the city center, the waiting time for a permit is up to four years. Our results indicate that one additional year of waiting for a parking permit reduces car ownership with 2 percentage points corresponding to a price elasticity of car demand of -0.8. We demonstrate that subsidizing residential parking induces a substantial welfare loss. On average, a parking permit induces an annual deadweight loss of € 270. Furthermore, we show that the provision of parking permits is an income-regressive policy: rich households are five times more likely than poor households to receive these (implicit) parking subsidies
Is the sky the limit? : an analysis of high-rise office buildings by Hans R. A Koster( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Historic amenities and housing externalities evidence from the Netherlands by Hans R.A Koster( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

It has been argued that the growth of cities is increasingly determined by the presence of amenities. We study the economic effects of large scale subsidised investments in historic amenities, by looking at their impact on house prices. We aim to distinguish between the direct and indirect effect of investments. The latter implies a change in the behaviour of neighbours via changes in the level of maintenance of the house. We use a large nationwide dataset with housing transactions from 1985-2011 and data on investments in cultural heritage. To control for the fact that these investments are non-randomly distributed over space we use repeat sales. Furthermore, we construct an instrument based on yearly fluctuations in the size of national subsidy programmes to maintain cultural heritage. We show that a one million euro per square kilometre increase in investments in cultural heritage leads to a price increase of 1.5-3.0 percent of non-targeted buildings. We do not find evidence that the maintenance state of properties that are not eligible for subsidies are improved, suggesting that any price effect due to investments in cultural heritage is a direct effect of investments
Historic Amenities and Housing Externalities: Evidence from the Netherlands( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : We study the economic effects of public investments in historic amenities by looking at their impact on house prices. We distinguish between direct and indirect effects of investments. A nationwide housing transaction is used as well as data on investments in cultural heritage. A 1 million euro per square kilometre increase in investments in cultural heritage leads to a price increase of 1.5-3.0% of non-targeted buildings. We do not find evidence that the maintenance state of non-eligible properties is improved, suggesting that any price effect due to investments in cultural heritage is a direct effect of investments
 
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Audience level: 0.83 (from 0.52 for Historic A ... to 0.96 for Amenities ...)

WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Alternative Names
Hans Koster econoom

Koster, H.R.A. 1987-

Koster, Hans

Koster, Hans 1987-

Koster, Hans R. A. 1987-

Koster, Hans Robert Aernout

Koster, Hans Robert Aernout 1987-

Languages
English (29)

Dutch (2)