WorldCat Identities

Brock, Paul

Overview
Works: 115 works in 210 publications in 3 languages and 2,112 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  Oral histories  Internet videos 
Roles: Author, Creator, Composer, Performer
Classifications: E185.97, 973.04960730092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Paul Brock
 
Most widely held works by Paul Brock
Der Strom fließt : Roman vom Memelland by Paul Brock( Book )

15 editions published between 1937 and 1979 in German and Swedish and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The HistoryMakers video oral history with Suzan-Lori Parks( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Theatrical playwright Suzan-Lori Parks was born on May 10, 1963 in Fort Knox, Kentucky. She attended college at Mount Holyoke, where she graduated with her B.A. degree in English and German literature in 1985. She moved to London and began her career as a playwright. In 1987, her script Betting on the Dust Commander was produced in New York, and two years later, her play Imperceptible Mutabilities in the Third Kingdom was awarded an Obie Award for Best Off-Broadway Play. In 1994, her script for The American Play was produced. In 2001, Parks’ play Topdog/Underdog was released to critical acclaim. She became the first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize. The following year, she was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship of $500,000. In 2003, Parks published Getting Mother’s Body, her first novel. Her 2014 play, Father Comes Home From the Wars, Parts 1, 2 & 3, was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize Award
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Acel Moore( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Journalism professor and newspaper columnist Acel Moore was born on October 5, 1940 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Moore attended Charles Morris Price School of Advertising and Journalism. He worked at the Philadelphia Inquirer as a copy boy in 1962. In 1964, he became an editorial clerk, also working as a staff writer. In 1970, Moore won the Pennsylvania Bar Association’s Scale of Justice Award for his series on the juvenile court system. In 1974, Moore and Reggie Bryant hosted a television show called Black Perspectives on the News. In 1977, Moore won the Pulitzer Prize for local investigative reporting for his series on abuse of inmates at Farview State Hospital. In the 1980s, Moore served on the faculty of University of California at Berkeley for the summer program for minority journalists. Moore lectured and wrote and trained staff for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Moore passed away on February 12, 2016 at age 75
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Robert Hooks( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Actor and theatre company founder Robert Hooks was born Bobby Dean Hooks on April 18, 1937 in Washington D.C. Hooks performed in his first play, The Pirates of Penzance, at the age of nine. Hooks attended and graduated from Francis Junior High School. He moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and attended his first integrated school at West Philadelphia High. Hooks soon joined the drama club and began acting in plays by playwrights including William Shakespeare and Samuel Beckett. Hooks moved to New York in 1959 to become an actor. His television career began in 1963 on the television series East Side/West Side. Some of his other television credits include The White Shadow, A Different World, and Seinfeld. Hooks’ film credits include movies by his son, Kevin Hooks’, Passenger 57 (1992) and Fled (1996). Along with Douglas Turner Ward, Hooks founded The Negro Ensemble Company, credited with launching the careers of many major black artists
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Reverend Cecil L. "Chip" Murray( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Community activist and pastor Cecil L. “Chip” Murray was born on September 26, 1929 in Lakeland, Florida. Murray earned his B.A. degree from Florida A&M University, but joined the United States Air Force after graduation. After leaving the Air Force, Murray attended the School of Theology at Claremont in California and earned his Rel.D. degree in religion. After working in Pomona, Kansas City and Seattle, Murray became leader of Los Angeles’ First African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1977. Under Murray, the congregation grew from several hundred members to roughly 18,000, and he became a nationally known figure in the wake of the 1992 Los Angeles riots. Under Murray’s leadership, the church became involved in job-training, homeownership loans, affordable housing and HIV/AIDS awareness. Murray retired as senior pastor on September 25, 2004 and began working as a senior fellow at the Center for Religion and Civic Culture in the School of Religion at the University of Southern California
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Samuel C. Thompson, Jr( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Academic administrator, professor, and lawyer Samuel C. Thompson, Jr. was born on October 25, 1943 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Thompson received his B.S. degree from West Chester University; his M.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School in 1969. Returning from the Vietnam War in 1971, Thompson received his J.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1972, Thompson earned his L.L.M. degree in taxation from New York University. He served as an assistant and associate professor of law at Northwestern University. Thompson was a partner-in-charge of the tax department at the law firm of Schiff Hardin & Waite in Chicago until 1990, when he joined the UCLA law school faculty. In 1994, Thompson left UCLA’s Law School to become the Dean of the University of Miami School of Law and then returned to UCLA’s Law School. Thompson has published numerous books throughout his career including Federal Income Taxation of Domestic and Foreign Business Transactions
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Florence LaRue( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Singer Florence LaRue was born on February 4, 1942 in Plainfield, New Jersey. LaRue earned her A.A. degree from Los Angeles City College and her B.A. degree in education from California State College in Los Angeles. After LaRue won the Miss Bronze California Contest, a photographer named Lamont McLemore offered her a place in his musical group, The Versatiles, which also included Marilyn McCoo, Billy Davis and Ron Townson. In 1967, the group was renamed the 5th Dimension and recorded the popular single “Go Where You Wanna Go,” which won a Grammy. The group continued releasing chart-topping singles throughout the 1960s and 1970s, including the hit song “Age of Aquarius.” Despite several lineup changes, they continued to record into the 1980s and 1990s, eventually appearing as The 5th Dimension Featuring Florence LaRue. In 1995 the group released In the House, which contained the track “Say (U Love Me),” penned by LaRue
The HistoryMakers video oral history with George White( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Journalist George White was born on December 3, 1953 in Detroit, Michigan. He received a scholarship to attend Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, where he graduated with honors and his B.S. degree in journalism and history in 1975. He went on to obtain his M.A. degree in African history in 1981, also from Michigan State University. He worked for a variety of media outlets, including the Minneapolis Tribune, the Detroit Bureau of U.S. News & World Report and the Detroit Free Press, until 1988, when White worked as a reporter at the Los Angeles Times, where he would remain until 1999. While at the Los Angeles Times, White received numerous accolades, including two Pulitzers, for his work covering the L.A. riots, the Northridge, California Earthquake, and sweatshop slavery in El Monte, California. White was assistant director of the Center for Communications and Community
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Lt. Col. Lucius P. Gregg( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aircraft commander and corporate executive Lucius Perry Gregg, Jr. was born on January 16, 1933, in Henderson, North Carolina. Gregg received his B.S. degree from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1955, and his M.S. degree in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1961. Gregg served as a pilot in the U.S. Air Force from 1956 to 1959. In 1961, Gregg worked in the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research as a project director in space technology until 1965. Gregg then became the associate dean of science at Northwestern University. In 1972, he was appointed vice president of the First Chicago University Finance Corporation. In 1985, Gregg moved to the New York Daily News as vice president of public affairs before accepting a position in corporate communications at Hughes Aircraft Company/Hughes Electronics in Los Angeles. Gregg served on several technological and scientific boards, received many commendations and awards for his achievements
The HistoryMakers video oral history with John J. Johnson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Association executive John Jay Johnson was born on February 10, 1945 in Louisville, Kentucky. Johnson was involved in the NAACP Youth Council and as a member of student government, and at age seventeen, he became the youngest president of any Kentucky chapter of the NAACP. In the 1980s, Johnson received his B.S. degree in community development and public administration from Sojourner-Douglass College in Baltimore. Johnson worked for the Kentucky Institute on Human Development. He worked with War on Poverty programs before becoming assistant director of the Louisville Human Rights Commission, and was promoted to director of community services for the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights. In 1984, he became director of the Louisville and Jefferson County Community Action Agency. Johnson joined the staff of the NAACP in Baltimore and was chief programs officer, before becoming the NAACP’s chief executive of operations, where he oversaw the executive office of the president and CEO
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Antwone Fisher( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Screenwriter and author Antwone Quenton Fisher was born on August 3, 1959, outside of Cleveland, Ohio. He grew up in several foster homes while not knowing his biological parents. He lived with the Picketts, a foster family who physically, sexually and emotionally abused him, for fourteen years. The Picketts then kicked him out of their house and he attended George Junior Republic School in Pennsylvania. After graduation, Fisher returned to Cleveland. He then spent eleven years in the U.S. Navy, after that as a federal corrections officer, and then he was hired as a security guard for Sony Pictures. After rediscovering his biological family, Fisher wrote his autobiography, Finding Fish. He sold the film rights to his story to 20th Century Fox; and, in 2002, the film Antwone Fisher was released. After that, Fisher worked as a screenwriter, director, author, and poet. His book A Boy Should Know How to Tie a Tie: And Other Lessons for Succeeding in Life was published in 2010
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Evelyn Freeman Roberts( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Musician Evelyn Freeman Roberts, born on February 13, 1919, grew up in Cleveland, Ohio in a musical family. In high school, Roberts saw Duke Ellington perform and decided to become a bandleader. She formed a group in high school and led it through her tenure as a student of the Cleveland Institute of Music. The Evelyn Freeman Swing Band played with great success throughout Cleveland in the 1940s. During World War II, the band was drafted as a unit, making it the first all-black band in the U.S. Navy. After the war ended, Freeman met and married bandleader Tommy Roberts. Moving to New York, Freeman continued to work in music, composing and arranging for television and for notable recording artists. In the 1970s, she moved to California, forming the Young Saints, who would perform at the White House. With her husband, she co-founded and administered the Young Saints Scholarship Foundation
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Julie Dash( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Filmmaker and author Julie Dash was born on October 22, 1952, in Manhattan, New York City. Dash received her B.A. degree from the City College of New York in 1974; and her MFA in motion picture and television production from the UCLA Film School. She produced a documentary for the New York Urban League, Working Models for Success. She was an American Film Institute Conservatory Fellow. Dash also studied film at the Studio Museum of Harlem in 1969. In 1977, she directed Diary of an African Nun, which won a Director’s Guild Award. In 1991, Dash produced, and directed Daughters of the Dust, becoming the first African American woman to have a full-length general theatrical release in the United States. In 1997, Dash wrote Daughters of the Dust: A Novel, a sequel to the film set 20 years later. Her television work includes the CBS television movie, The Rosa Parks Story
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Dick Gregory( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Comedian and social activist Dick Gregory was born on October 12, 1932 in St. Louis, Missouri. Gregory attended Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, on a track scholarship. His college education was interrupted when he was drafted into the U.S. Army where he first worked as a stand-up comedian. In 1961, Gregory was hired to work at the Chicago Playboy Club. In 1964, Gregory released his autobiography Nigger, which sold seven million copies. In the mid-1960s, Gregory became involved in the Civil Rights Movement and ran unsuccessfully in elections against Chicago Mayor Richard Daley in 1967 and against President Richard Nixon in 1968. A nutrition guru, Gregory was the creator of the Bahamian Diet Nutrition Drink. He ranked eighty-first on Comedy Central’s list of the 100 Greatest Stand-Up Comedians of All Time. Gregory published the following several books. Gregory passed away on August 19, 2017
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Angeles Echols( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Actress and nonprofit executive Angeles Echols was born on January 11, 1957, in Memphis, Tennessee. She attended Georgia Elementary School, Hamilton Middle School and graduated from Hamilton High School in 1975. She earned her B.A. degree in psychology from Cornell University in 1979 and her M.A. degree in counseling, marriage and family child therapy in 2007, also studying drama in graduate school. In 1989, she was cast in the film, She Knows Too Much. In 2005, Echols portrayed the title character in Sojourner, a play about activist Sojourner Truth. Echols pursued her interest and belief in the transformative power of combining dramatic arts and therapy. Beginning with 2 students in her apartment, she built Educating Young Minds, a learning environment for inner city youth. EYM also provides college scholarships for EYM high school graduates. Echols received awards from Yvonne Braithwaite-Burke, the City of Los Angeles, the California State Assembly and the U.S. Senate
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Paul Brock( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Journalist Paul Brock was born on February 10, 1932, in Washington, D.C. After graduating from Howard University, he spent eighteen years as a radio journalist before joining station WBNB in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Next, Brock was news director at WETA where he was credited with the first live coverage of a congressional committee hearing. He was also the originator of the NAACP Nightly Convention Highlights program that aired on PBS from 1978 to 1983. He was producer, writer, editor and national distributor of the NAACP Voter Education public service announcements. He joined the NAACP in 1948 and became an active member of the organization. He was media coordinator of the Village Foundation in 1994 where he remained until 2002. In 1975, Jet and Ebony magazines recognized Brock as Man of the Year. In 1975, He was a founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Malvyn Johnson( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Media consultant, television and radio correspondent Malvyn Johnson was born on July 4, 1924 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She earned her B.A. degree at Temple University. After graduation, she worked as a teacher. She attended Springfield University in Massachusetts where she received her M.A. degree in intergroup relations and community dynamics. When her husband passed away in the early 1960s, Johnson became involved in the Civil Rights Movement. In 1964, Johnson became director of community affairs for WKBS-TV. In 1969, Johnson began working at Cox Radio and Television News Bureau in Washington, D.C. where she stayed for twenty-seven years. She was the first female White House correspondent, covering five United States presidents, Capitol Hill, and the State Department. In 2000, she left Cox to create her own media consulting firm, Medialinx International. Johnson passed away on November 7, 2007 at age 83
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Simeon Booker( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Magazine and newspaper reporter Simeon Saunders Booker, Jr., was born August 27, 1918, in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1942, after receiving his B.A. degree in English from Virginia Union University, Booker worked at the Baltimore's Afro American Newspaper. In 1945, he began working for the Call and Post in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1950, Booker was awarded the Nieman Fellowship in journalism from Harvard University. He became the Washington Post's first full-time black reporter in 1951. Booker made history with unflinching coverage of the Emmett Till tragedy in 1955. In 1961, Booker rode with the Congress on Racial Equality Freedom Riders through the South. He was Washington bureau chief for Johnson Publishing for fifty-three years, covering every presidential election after Eisenhower's re-election and traveling abroad extensively. In 1982, Booker received the National Press Club's Fourth Estate Award. In 2013, he published Shocking the Conscience: A Reporter's Account of the Civil Rights Movement
The HistoryMakers video oral history with The Honorable Vaino Spencer( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Judge Vaino Hassan Spencer was born on July 22, 1920 in Los Angeles, California. Spencer graduated from Polytechnic High School in 1938 and received her A.A. degree from Los Angeles City College in 1949. Spencer obtained her L.L.B. degree from Southwestern University School of Law in 1952. In 1961, Spencer worked as a general practice attorney of law in Los Angeles. Spencer served as a municipal court judge for the Los Angeles Judicial District until 1976. She was appointed to the Los Angeles County Superior Court and served until 1980. This distinction marked Spencer the first African American woman to sit on the bench in California. In 1979, Spencer and Presiding Justice Joan Dempsey Klein, founded the National Association of Women Judges. In 1980, Spencer began serving as the Presiding Judge of the Division One California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, a position she held for over twenty years
The HistoryMakers video oral history with Juliet Dobbs Blackburn-Beamon( Visual )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Foundation executive and humanities professor Juliet Dobbs Blackburn-Beamon, was born on October 3, 1937, in Atlanta, Georgia. She grew up in Jackson, Mississippi, where her mother taught at Jackson College for Negro Teachers, now Jackson State University. Graduating from Spelman College in 1958, she earned her M.S. degree from New York University in 1959 and her Ph.D. from Clark Atlanta in 1996. Before her academic career, Blackburn-Beamon worked for Lane Bryant and later for the State of New York Department of Labor. In 1996, she became chair of the Art and Architectural Studies Department at Morris Brown College, in addition to teaching at Spelman and Clark Atlanta Universities. In 2004, Blackburn-Beamon created the John W. Dobbs Foundation in honor of her maternal grandfather. She also served on the board of Atlanta’s Center for Puppetry Arts. Blackburn-Beamon received numerous awards and honors, including the Leadership Atlanta Award in 1994
 
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Audience level: 0.52 (from 0.49 for The Histor ... to 0.88 for Der Strom ...)

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Alternative Names
Brock, Peter Paul.

Brock, Peter Paul 1900-1986

Brokas Paulius

Paul Brock Duits schrijver (1900-1986)

Paul Brock écrivain allemand

Paul Brock German writer (1900-1986)

Брок, Пауль

Languages
English (20)

German (13)

Swedish (2)