WorldCat Identities

Karstoft, Kristian

Overview
Works: 12 works in 13 publications in 1 language and 184 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Author, Other, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Kristian Karstoft
Optimizing Exercise for the Prevention and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes by Jonathan Peter Little( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Optimizing exercise for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Interval training for subjects with type 2 diabetes : doctoral dissertation by Kristian Karstoft( Book )

2 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The association between renal function and structural parameters: a pig study by Anders B Lødrup( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

GLP-1 secretion is regulated by IL-6 signalling: a randomised, placebo-controlled study by Helga Ellingsgaard( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Criterion validity and reliability of a smartphone delivered sub-maximal fitness test for people with type 2 diabetes by Cecilie Fau Brinkløv( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impact of acute bouts of interval and continuous walking on energy-intake and appetite regulation in subjects with type 2 diabetes( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: In healthy subjects, it has been suggested that exercise may acutely suppress energy-intake and appetite, with peak intensity being an important determinant for this effect. In subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D), the effect of exercise on appetite-related variables is, however, virtually unknown. We aimed to assess the effects of two exercise interventions, differing with regards to peak intensity, on energy-intake, satiety and appetite-related hormones in subjects with T2D. Thirteen subjects with T2D completed three 60-min interventions with continuous measurement of oxygen consumption in a randomized and counterbalanced order: (1) Control, (2) Continuous walking (CW; intended 73% of VO2 peak), (3) Interval-walking (IW; repeated cycles of 3min slow [54% of VO2 peak] and 3min fast walking [89% of VO2 peak]). Forty-five minutes after completion of the intervention, a 3-h liquid mixed meal tolerance test (MMTT, 450kcal) with regular satiety assessments and blood samples for appetite-related hormones commenced. An adlibitum meal was served after the MMTT, with subsequent calculation of energy-intake. Moreover, free-living diet records were completed for the following ~32h. Exercise interventions were well-matched for mean oxygen consumption (CW=77±2% of VO2 peak; IW=76±1% of VO2 peak, P>0.05). No differences in appetite-related hormones or energy-intake were found (P>0.05 for all comparisons). IW increased fullness compared to Control shortly after the intervention (P <0.05) and tended to reduce hunger 2h into the MMTT compared to CW and Control (P <0.10). In conclusion, a single exercise session does not affect energy-intake during the following ~4-36h in subjects with T2D. However, satiety may be affected up to ~3h after the exercise session, dependent on peak intensity. Abstract : A single exercise session does not affect energy-intake during the following ~4-36h in subjects with type 2 diabetes. However, satiety may be affected up to ~3h after the exercise session, dependent on peak intensity
The immediate effects of a single bout of aerobic exercise on oral glucose tolerance across the glucose tolerance continuum( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract We investigated glucose tolerance and postprandial glucose fluxes immediately after a single bout of aerobic exercise in subjects representing the entire glucose tolerance continuum. Twenty-four men with normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or type 2 diabetes (T2D; age: 56±1years; body mass index: 27.8±0.7kg/m2, P>0.05) underwent a 180-min oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) combined with constant intravenous infusion of [6, 6-2H2]glucose and ingestion of [U-13C]glucose, following 1h of exercise (50% of peak aerobic power) or rest. In both trials, plasma glucose concentrations and kinetics, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon were measured. Rates (mgkg−1min−1) of glucose appearance from endogenous (RaEndo) and exogenous (oral glucose; RaOGTT) sources, and glucose disappearance (Rd) were determined. We found that exercise increased RaEndo, RaOGTT, and Rd (all P<0.0001) in all groups with a tendency for a greater (~20%) peak RaOGTT value in NGT subjects when compared to IGT and T2D subjects. Accordingly, following exercise, the plasma glucose concentration during the OGTT was increased in NGT subjects (P<0.05), while unchanged in subjects with IGT and T2D. In conclusion, while a single bout of moderate-intensity exercise increased the postprandial glucose response in NGT subjects, glucose tolerance following exercise was preserved in the two hyperglycemic groups. Thus, postprandial plasma glucose responses immediately following exercise are dependent on the underlying degree of glycemic control
Intermittent Standing but not a Moderate Exercise Bout Reduces Postprandial Glycemia( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study aimed to determine whether minimum recommended moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; 30-min bout of continuous moderate-intensity walking) is sufficient to counteract the detrimental effects of prolonged sitting on postprandial metabolism and if there are any effects of breaking up sitting with intermittent standing when achieving minimum recommended MVPA. Methods: Fourteen ( n = 14) physically inactive healthy adult males underwent four intrahospital 27-h interventions: 9-h continuous sitting (SIT), 15-min standing bouts every 30 min during the 9-h sitting (STAND), 30-min moderate-intensity walking bout followed by 8.5 h of sitting (MVPA), and 30-min moderate-intensity walking bout followed by 15-min standing bouts every 30 min during 8.5 h of sitting (MVPA + STAND). Three standardized meals on intervention day (day 1) and breakfast the following day (day 2) were served. Results: Cumulative postprandial glucose response (incremental area under the curve) was lower in STAND versus SIT (↓27%, P = 0.04, effect size [ES] = −0.7) because of decreases in postprandial glucose after breakfast on day 1 (STAND vs SIT: ↓40%, P = 0.01, ES = −0.7) and day 2 (STAND vs SIT: ↓33%, P = 0.06, ES = −0.6). STAND did not affect postprandial insulin responses. Cumulative postprandial insulin response was lower in MVPA versus SIT (↓18%, P = 0.03, ES = −0.3) and MVPA + STAND versus SIT (↓26%, P = 0.02, ES = −0.4) because of expected exercise-induced decreases in postprandial insulin after breakfast on day 1 only (MVPA vs SIT: ↓36%, P = 0.003, ES = −0.7; MVPA + STAND vs SIT: ↓43%, P = 0.0001, ES = −0.8). Conclusion: Breaking up prolonged sitting with nonambulatory standing across 9 h acutely reduced postprandial glycemic response during and the day after the intervention independent of insulin levels, whereas a 30-min MVPA bout did not. Abstract : Supplemental digital content is available in the text
 
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English (13)