WorldCat Identities

Mitchell, Edward A. D.

Overview
Works: 23 works in 24 publications in 4 languages and 31 library holdings
Roles: Author, Contributor, Creator
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Edward A. D Mitchell
Etat de la biodiversité en Suisse en 2014 : une analyse scientifique( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in French and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Testate amoebae and other micro-organisms in Sphagnum peatlands : ecology, paleoecology and impact of carbon dioxide enrichment by Edward A. D Mitchell( Book )

2 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Response of forest soil euglyphid testate amoebae (Rhizaria: Cercozoa) to pig cadavers assessed by high-throughput sequencing by Christophe V. W Seppey( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Decomposition and insect colonization patterns of pig cadavers lying on forest soil and suspended above ground by Nina Feddern( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Historia rozwoju dwóch torfowisk mszarnych w Borach Tucholskich by Mariusz Lamentowicz( )

1 edition published in 2006 in Polish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Soil chemistry changes beneath decomposing cadavers over a one-year period( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: Decomposing cadavers affected below ground soil chemistry. Cadavers caused significant increases of ammonium, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium in the first two months. Nitrate significantly increased after eight months. pH increased significantly at first and then decreased significantly at the end of the experiment. Chemical markers could be assigned to groups and may have the potential to date the time since death (post-mortem interval). Abstract: Decomposing vertebrate cadavers release large, localized inputs of nutrients. These temporally limited resource patches affect nutrient cycling and soil organisms. The impact of decomposing cadavers on soil chemistry is relevant to soil biology, as a natural disturbance, and forensic science, to estimate the postmortem interval. However, cadaver impacts on soils are rarely studied, making it difficult to identify common patterns. We investigated the effects of decomposing pig cadavers (Sus scrofa domesticus) on soil chemistry (pH, ammonium, nitrate, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and carbon) over a one-year period in a spruce-dominant forest. Four treatments were applied, each with five replicates: two treatments including pig cadavers (placed on the ground and hung one metre above ground) and two controls (bare soil and bags filled with soil placed on the ground i.e. "fake pig" treatment). In the first two months (15-59 days after the start of the experiment), cadavers caused significant increases of ammonium, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium (p <0.05) whereas nitrate significantly increased towards the end of the study (263-367 days; p <0.05). Soil pH increased significantly at first and then decreased significantly at the end of the experiment. After one year, some markers returned to basal levels (i.e. not significantly different from control plots), whereas others were still significantly different. Based on these response patterns and in comparison with previous studies, we define three categories of chemical markers that may have the potential to date the time since death: early peak markers (EPM), late peak markers (LPM) and late decrease markers (LDM). The marker categories will enhance our understanding of soil processes and can be highly useful when changes in soil chemistry are related to changes in the composition of soil organism communities. For actual casework further studies and more data are necessary to refine the marker categories along a more precise timeline and to develop a method that can be used in court
Mille ans d'extension urbaine à Neuchâtel : évolution des paysages et des sols by Joël Amossé( )

1 edition published in 2014 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Premier recensement des types de sols urbains de l'agglomération neuchâteloise : rapport final de mandat, mars 2011 by Alessandro Staehli( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in French and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The performance of single- and multi-proxy transfer functions (testate amoebae, bryophytes, vascular plants) for reconstructing mire surface wetness and pH by Edward A. D Mitchell( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Changes in testate amoebae (Protists) communities in a small raised bog : a 40-year study by Keiko Kishaba( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Functional responses of multitaxa communities to disturbance and stress gradients in a restored floodplain( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trait-based approaches can reveal the mechanisms through which disturbances or stress impact communities, allowing comparisons of the role of different mechanisms in shaping communities among taxonomic groups. Such information can lead to higher comparability, transferability and predictability of the outcome of restoration projects. However, multitaxa trait-based approaches were rarely used in the context of ecosystem restoration. We investigated the responses to environmental gradients of seven taxa (vascular plants, staphylinid and carabid beetles, spiders, isopods, diplopods and earthworms) in a restored floodplain using a species traits approach. We assessed the impact of flood disturbances and soil hydric stress on the functional diversity (FD) and community-weighted mean (CWM) response of traits for each taxon. Ordination of hydrological variables revealed two main gradients. The first was related to the spatiotemporal dynamics of flood disturbances and the second to the average changes in soil hydric conditions. The analysis of CWM revealed that larger, poorly mobile species with narrow ecological tolerances were filtered by regular floods and/or changes in soil hydric conditions. Functional diversity patterns differed between the two gradients: decreasing with increasing flood disturbance, but increasing along the soil hydric stress gradient. This suggests that the mechanisms shaping community composition differ between the two gradients with environmental filtering being dominant with increasing flood disturbances and competition decreasing with more soil hydric stress. Synthesis and applications. Our study shows that the impact of restored flood disturbances and soil hydric stress on plant and invertebrate functional diversity and community-weighted mean can be positive, negative or more complex depending on the taxonomic group and environmental gradient considered. The patterns can to some extent be explained by the specific characteristics of each group. Larger, poorly mobile species with narrow ecological tolerances were particularly vulnerable to changes in disturbance and stress regime following floodplain restoration. These species may therefore be lost in the initial phases of restoration projects, but other more characteristic species of dynamic floodplains will be favoured. Understanding the consequences of these contrasted responses for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning constitutes the next challenge for ecosystem restoration
The postglacial developmental history of the Praz-Rodet bog, Vallée de Joux, Swiss Jura by Edward A.D Mitchell( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Die Vielfalt an Arten in der Schweiz wird deutlich unterschätzt( )

1 edition published in 2013 in German and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Can pollution bias peatland paleoclimate reconstruction? by Richard J Payne( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Ultra-trace level determination of neonicotinoids in honey as a tool for assessing environmental contamination( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Relationship between atmospheric pollution characterized by NO2 concentrations and testate amoebae density and diversity( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

CBOL Protist Working Group Barcoding Eukaryotic Richness beyond the Animal, Plant, and Fungal Kingdoms by Jan Pawlowski( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Environmental filtering and phylogenetic clustering correlate with the distribution patterns of cryptic protist species( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: The community composition of any group of organisms should theoretically be determined by a combination of assembly processes including resource partitioning, competition, environmental filtering, and phylogenetic legacy. Environmental DNA studies have revealed a huge diversity of protists in all environments, raising questions about the ecological significance of such diversity and the degree to which they obey to the same rules as macroscopic organisms. The fast-growing cultivable protist species on which hypotheses are usually experimentally tested represent only a minority of the protist diversity. Addressing these questions for the lesser known majority can only be inferred through observational studies. We conducted an environmental DNA survey of the genus Nebela, a group of closely related testate (shelled) amoeba species, in different habitats within Sphagnum -dominated peatlands. Identification based on the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene, allowed species-level resolution as well as phylogenetic reconstruction. Community composition varied strongly across habitats and associated environmental gradients. Species showed little overlap in their realized niche, suggesting resource partitioning, and a strong influence of environmental filtering driving community composition. Furthermore, phylogenetic clustering was observed in the most nitrogen-poor samples, supporting phylogenetic inheritance of adaptations in the group of N.guttata . This study showed that the studied free-living unicellular eukaryotes follow to community assembly rules similar to those known to determine plant and animal communities; the same may be true for much of the huge functional and taxonomic diversity of protists
 
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Languages
English (16)

French (3)

German (1)

Polish (1)