WorldCat Identities

Lima de Miranda, Katharina

Overview
Works: 14 works in 19 publications in 2 languages and 40 library holdings
Roles: Author, Other
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Katharina Lima de Miranda
Social Comparison and Gender Differences in Risk Taking by Ulrich Schmidt( )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mindfulness, preferences and well-being : Mindfulness predicts adolescents' field behaviour by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Can gender quotas prevent risky choice shifts? The effect of gender composition on group decisions under risk by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study contributes to the public debate on gender quotas and the literature on gender and risk taking by analysing how the level of risk taking within a group is influenced by its gender composition. In particular we look at the shift of risk taking between group and individual decisions and analyse to which extent this shift depends on the gender composition. We derive a gender-specific polarization hypothesis which states that compared to individual preferences, male dominated groups will shift towards higher risk taking than female dominated ones. Our experimental tests reveal a systematic impact of gender composition on group shifts which supports our hypothesis and points into the direction that a higher share of females may prevent excessive risk taking
Recoupling economic and social prosperity by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

4 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper explores a new theoretical and empirical approach to the assessment of human well-being, relevant to current challenges of social fragmentation in the presence of globalization and technological advance. We present two indexes of well-being - solidarity (S) and agency (A) - to be considered alongside the standard indexes of material gain (G) and environmental sustainability (E). The four indexes - SAGE - form a balanced dashboard for evaluating well-being. The solidarity index covers the needs of humans as social creatures, living in societies that generate a sense of social belonging. The agency index involves people's need to influence their fate through their own efforts. While "economic prosperity" (material gain) is conventionally measured through GDP per capita, "social prosperity" can be measured through our solidarity and agency indexes, alongside environmental sustainability that is measured through the Environmental Performance Index. The SAGE dashboard is meant to provide a "sage" approach to assessing well-being, since it aims to denote sagacity in the pursuit and satisfaction of fundamental human needs and purposes. Many of the prominent challenges of the twenty-first century, including the dissatisfaction of population groups who feel left behind by globalization and technological advance, may be viewed in terms of a "decoupling" of economic prosperity from social prosperity. We present a theoretical model that provides a new perspective on the welfare effects of globalization and automation. The dashboard is meant to provide an empirical basis for mobilizing action in government, business and civil society to promote a recoupling of economic and social prosperity
Overconfidence and hygiene non-compliance in hospitals by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

1 edition published in 2020 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Among measures to fight hospital acquired infections, an emerging epidemic in many countries around the world, adoption of appropriate hand hygiene practices by healthcare workers is considered a priority. Despite their simplicity and effectiveness, healthcare workers' compliance is poor, with most empirical studies finding compliance rates well below 50% in many countries. Management strategies to increase compliance are often based on the notion that non-compliance is a moral hazard problem, characterized by asymmetric information between hospital management and healthcare workers. In this study, we provide empirical evidence that an individual behavioral characteristic, known as overconfidence, induces many healthcare workers to overestimate their hand hygiene compliance and hence to underperform unknowingly and unintentionally
Risk taking and economic outcomes : the role of social context by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Exploiting behavioural insights to foster global cooperation by Gianluca Grimalda( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Risk Preferences and Predictions about Others : No Association with 2D:4D Ratio by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The societal responses to COVID-19 : evidence from the G7 countries by Katharina Lima de Miranda( )

2 editions published in 2021 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper provides a new picture of how countries have responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by examining the effects of the pandemic in terms of normative foundations for societal wellbeing. Social prosperity depends primarily on the functioning of four domains: the economy, the state, civil society and the environment. We use the Recoupling Dashboard -- composed of four main indexes: Solidarity (S), Agency (A), GDP (material Gain, G) and Environmental sustainability (E) -- to uncover the divergent experiences of countries in 2020. This paper focuses on the G7 countries -- Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States -- as the first step towards a wider appraisal. In all countries under review we see a sharp drop in GDP due to the pandemic and a corresponding drop in CO2 emissions. The uniformity of response in the economic and environmental domains stands in sharp contrast to the diversity of social responses to the challenge of cooperation that the coronavirus posed. The only clear pattern that emerges from cross-country comparisons is that Inward Solidarity, important for social cohesion in close social networks, and Outward Solidarity, important for the will to cooperate with other nations and cultures, have drifted apart in all G7 countries except Japan. Otherwise the movements in solidarity are highly idiosyncratic. In addition, the responses of Agency to the pandemic are diverse and are not noticeably correlated with the changes in Solidarity. The discrepancies in the social responses to the pandemic may be expected to have potentially important implications for how these countries fare during the pandemic and how well they come out of this crisis
Are Economic Preferences Shaped by the Family Context? The Impact of Birth Order and Siblings' Sex Composition on Economic Preferences by Lena Detlefsen( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The formation of economic preferences in childhood and adolescence has long-term consequences for life-time outcomes. We study in an experiment with 525 teenagers how both birth order and siblings' sex composition affect risk, time and social preferences. We find that second born children are typically less patient, less risk averse, and more trusting. However, siblings' sex composition interacts importantly with birth order effects. Second born children are more risk taking only with same-sex siblings. For trust and trustworthiness, birth order effects are larger with mixed-sex siblings than in the single-sex case. Only for patience, siblings' sex composition does not matter
Are Economic Preferences Shaped by the Family Context? The Impact of Birth Order and Siblings' Sex Composition on Economic Preferences by Lena Detlefsen( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The formation of economic preferences in childhood and adolescence has long-term consequences for life-time outcomes. We study in an experiment with 525 teenagers how both birth order and siblings' sex composition affect risk, time and social preferences. We find that second born children are typically less patient, less risk averse, and more trusting. However, siblings' sex composition interacts importantly with birth order effects. Second born children are more risk taking only with same-sex siblings. For trust and trustworthiness, birth order effects are larger with mixed-sex siblings than in the single-sex case. Only for patience, siblings' sex composition does not matter
Are economic preferences shaped by the family context? the impact of birth order and siblings' sex composition on economic preferences by Lena Detlefsen( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The formation of economic preferences in childhood and adolescence has long-term consequences for life-time outcomes. We study in an experiment with 525 teenagers how both birth order and siblings' sex composition affect risk, time and social preferences. We find that second born children are typically less patient, less risk averse, and more trusting. However, siblings' sex composition interacts importantly with birth order effects. Second born children are more risk taking only with same-sex siblings. For trust and trustworthiness, birth order effects are larger with mixed-sex siblings than in the single-sex case. Only for patience, siblings' sex composition does not matter
Insurance Demand and Social Comparison : an Experimental Analysis by Andreas Friedl( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  General Special  
Audience level: 0.89 (from 0.72 for Insurance ... to 0.97 for Overconfid ...)

Alternative Names
Beyerlein, Katharina 1985-

Miranda, Katharina Lima de 1985-

Languages
English (18)

German (1)