WorldCat Identities

Popov, Vladimir 1954-

Overview
Works: 27 works in 38 publications in 2 languages and 134 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: HC51, 330.904
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Vladimir Popov
Mapping a new world order : the rest beyond the West( Book )

9 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 93 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

China is in the process of overtaking the US as the world's largest economy, and a few other East and South Asian countries are steadily increasing their presence in global markets. The authors of this book agree that the contours of a 'different' economic and political order are emerging as the West is effectively struggling to hold on to its global pre-eminence. Meanwhile, the torch is slowly (albeit uncertainly) passing to a new generation of international players. Some version of a new multilateral order is emerging; an order that is both different from the previous one, but also marked by multiple and significant continuities. This book identifies possible factors responsible for the recent rise of many developing countries. It examines how robust these trends actually are and speculatively predicts the implications and consequences that may result from a continuation of these trends. It also suggests possible scenarios of future development. Ultimately, it argues that the rise of 'the Rest' would not only imply geopolitical shifts, but could lead to the proliferation of the new growth models in the global South and to profound changes in international economic relations
Mixed fortunes : an economic history of China, Russia, and the West by V. V Popov( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The rise of the West is often attributed the presence of certain features in Western countries from the sixteenth century onwards such as the abolition of serfdom and protestant ethics, the protection of property rights, and free universities; elements that were absent in more traditional societies. The problem with this reasoning is that, before the 16th century, there were many countries with social structures that possessed these same features that didn't experience rapid productivity growth. This book offers a new interpretation of the 'Great Divergence' and 'Great Convergence' stories. It explores how Western countries grew rich and why parts of the developing world (South and East Asia and Middle East) did not catch up during the period 1500-1950 but began to prosper after 1950, whereas others (Latin America, South Africa, and Russia) thrived from 1500 to 1950 but have experienced relative slowdown since 1950. Mixed Fortunes offers a novel interpretation of the rise of the West and of the subsequent development of 'the rest' and China and Russia, important examples of these two groups of developing countries, are examined in greater detail
The long road to normalcy : where Russia now stands by Vladimir Popov( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The goal of this study is to reveal the long-term trajectory of Russian economic development and to make predictions for the future. The study starts with a much discussed question: why Russia did worse economically during transition than most other countries in Europe and Asia? It is argued that it was partly caused by objective circumstances before transition (distortions in industrial structure and in trade patterns accumulated during the era of central planning), but mostly by the weakening of the institutional capacity of the state during transition. -- economic transition ; institutional trajectories ; Russia ; China
Ėkonomičeskoj cikl i norma pribyli v SŠa by Vladimir V Popov( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in Russian and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lessons from the transition economies : putting the success stories of the postcommunist world into a broader perspective by Vladimir Popov( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why many transition economies succeeded by pursuing policies that are so different from the radical economic liberalization (shock therapy) that is normally credited for the economic success of central European countries? First, optimal policies are context dependent, they are specific for each stage of development and what worked in Slovenia cannot be expected to work in Mongolia. Second, even for countries at the same level of development, reforms needed to stimulate growth are different; they depend on the previous history and on the path chosen. The reduction of government expenditure as a share of GDP did not undermine significantly the institutional capacity of the state in China, but in Russia and other CIS states it turned out to be ruinous. It is the growth diagnostics that should reveal the missing ingredient for economic growth. Finally, and most important, introducing this "missing ingredient" should not result in the destruction of other preconditions for growth. The art of the policymaker is to create markets without causing the government failure, as happened in many CIS countries. -- transition ; growth diagnostics ; path dependence
Resource abundance : a curse or blessing? by V. M Polterovich( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Global imbalances : non-conventional view by Vladimir V Popov( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

To devalue or not to devalue? how East European countries responded to the outflow of capital in 1997-99 and in 2008-09 by Vladimir Popov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

If there is a negative terms of trade or financial shock leading to the deterioration in the balance of payments, there are two basic options for a country that has limited foreign exchange reserves. First, a country can maintain a fixed exchange rate (or even a currency board) and wait until the reduction of foreign exchange reserves leads to the reduction of money supply: this will drive domestic prices down and stimulate exports, raise interest rates and stimulate the inflow of capital, and finally will correct the balance of payments. Second, the country can allow the devaluation of national currency - flexible exchange rate will automatically bring the balance of payments back into the equilibrium. Because national prices are less flexible than exchange rates, the first type of adjustment is associated with the greater reduction of output. The empirical evidence on East European countries and other transition economies for 1998-99 period (outflow of capital after the 1997 Asian and 1998 Russian currency crises and slowdown of output growth rates) suggests that the second type of policy response (devaluation) was associated with smaller loss of output than the first type (monetary contraction). 2008-09 developments provide additional evidence for this hypothesis
To devaluate or not to devalue? How East European Countries responded to the outflow of capital in 1997-99 and in 2008-09 by Vladimir V Popov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Shock therapy versus gradualism reconsidered: lessons from transition economies after 15 years of reforms( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper starts by separating the transformational recession (reduction of output in most transition economies in the first half of the 1990s) from the process of economic growth (recovery from the transformational recession) in 28 transition economies (including China, Vietnam and Mongolia). It is argued that the former (the collapse of output during transition) can be best explained as adverse supply shock caused mostly by a change in relative prices after their deregulation due to distortions in industrial structure and trade patterns accumulated during the period of central planning, and by the collapse of state institutions during transition period, while the speed of liberalization, to the extent it was endogenous, i.e. determined by political economy factors, had an adverse effect on performance. In contrast, at the recovery stage the ongoing liberalization starts to affect growth positively, whereas the impact of pre-transition distortions disappears. Institutional capacity and reasonable macroeconomic policy, however, continue to be important prerequisites for successful performance
Macroeconomic policies in countries of the global south( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Do we need to protect intellectual property rights? by Vladimir V Popov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Life cycle of the centrally planned economy: why soviet growth rates peaked in the 1950s( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The highest rates of growth of labor productivity in the Soviet Union were observed not in the 1930s (3% annually), but in the 1950s (6%). The TFP growth rates by decades increased from 0.6% annually in the 1930s to 2.8% in the 1950s and then fell monotonously becoming negative in the 1980s. The decade of 1950s was thus the golden period of Soviet economic growth. The patterns of Soviet growth of the 1950s in terms of growth accounting were very similar to the Japanese growth of the 1950s-70s and to Korean and Taiwanese growth in the 1960-80s - fast increases in labor productivity counterweighted the decline in capital productivity, so that the TFP increased markedly. However, high Soviet economic growth lasted only for a decade, whereas in East Asia it continued for three to four decades, propelling Japan, South Korea and Taiwan into the ranks of developed countries. This paper offers an explanation for the inverted U-shaped trajectory of labor productivity and TFP in centrally planned economies (CPEs). It is argued that CPEs under-invested into the replacement of the retiring elements of the fixed capital stock and over-invested into the expansion of production capacities. The task of renovating physical capital contradicted the short-run goal of fulfilling plan targets, and therefore Soviet planners preferred to invest in new capacities instead of upgrading the old ones. Hence, after the massive investment of the 1930s in the USSR, the highest productivity was achieved after the period equal to the average service life of fixed capital stock (about 20 years) - before there emerged a need for the massive investment into replacing retirement. Afterwards, the capital stock started to age rapidly reducing sharply capital productivity and lowering labor productivity and TFP growth rates
Life cycle of the centrally planned economy : why Soviet growth rates peaked in the 1950s by Vladimir V Popov( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

China's rise, Russia's fall: medium term perspective( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This chapter is an attempt to interpret recent rapid Chinese growth in a longer term perspective. First, it is argued that recent economic liberalization produced spectacular results (1979-onwards) because reform strategy was very different from the Washington consensus package (gradual rather than instant deregulation of prices, no mass privatization, strong industrial policy, undervaluation of the exchange rate via accumulation of reserves). Besides, the recent Chinese success (1979-onwards) is based on the achievements of the Mao period (1949-76) - strong state institutions, efficient government and increased pool of human capital. Unlike in the former Soviet Union, these achievements were not squandered in China due to gradual rather than shock-therapy type democratization
Development theories and development experience half a century journey by Vladimir Popov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This paper examines the impact that development theories have had on development policies, and the inverse impact of actual successes and failures in the global South on development thinking. It is argued that development thinking is at the cross-roads. Development theories in postwar period went through a full circle - from Big Push and ISI to neo-liberal Washington consensus to the understanding that neither the former, nor the later really works in engineering successful catch-up development. Meanwhile, economic miracles were manufactured in East Asia without much reliance on development thinking and theoretical background - just by experimentation of the strong hand politicians
Mortality crisis in Russia revisited : evidence from cross-regional comparison by Vladimir Popov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Do we need to protect intellectual property rights? by Vladimir Popov( )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Strict protection of IPR can have a negative effect on economic development. Regression of economic growth on these indices produces conventional results (positive effect of stricter protection of IPR on growth) only if indices of institutional capacity (government effectiveness, control over corruption) are not included into the right hand side. If they are included, they kill the effect of IPR protection (because they are very much correlated with the IPR protection indices), so it is hardly possible to separate the effects of stricter IPR protection from the impact of the general strength of institutions. The same procedure was used to evaluate the impact of the IPR protection regime on the average share of R&D expenditure in GDP and the results were largely the same: without control for the institutional capacity, IPR protection seems to stimulate R&D, but after controlling for the institutional indices the effect disappears. There is also a strong negative effect of stricter regime of protection of IPR on the proliferation of the most crucial technology of recent decades' computers. The increase in the total number of PCs in 1995-2005, after controlling for the level of development, the size of the country and the institutional index, is negatively correlated with the IPR protection index. If piracy of intellectual products allows to overcome the negative impact of IPR protection on the dissemination of new technologies, it is reasonable to talk not about costs of piracy, but about the benefits of piracy and the costs of stricter IPR protection
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.71 (from 0.06 for Macroecono ... to 0.97 for Mapping a ...)

Alternative Names
Popov, V. 1954-

Popov, V. V. 1954-

Popov, Vladimir 1954-

Popov, Vladimir Viktorovič 1954-

Popov, Vladimir Viktorovich 1954-

Popow, W. 1954-

Vladimir Leonidovich Popov matemático ruso

Vladimir Leonidovich Popov matematico russo

Vladimir Leonidovich Popov matematikan rus

Vladimir Leonidovich Popov mathématicien russe

Vladimir Leonidovich Popov Russian mathematician

Wladimir Leonidowitsch Popow russischer Wissenschaftler und Mathematiker

فلاديمير بوبوف رياضياتي روسي

Languages