WorldCat Identities

Metnitz, Philipp

Overview
Works: 13 works in 14 publications in 1 language and 26 library holdings
Roles: Other, Contributor
Classifications: R1, 616.028
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Philipp Metnitz
Hemodynamic management of critically ill burn patients: an international survey by Sabri Soussi( )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Year in review in intensive care medicine. 2005. I. Acute respiratory failure and acute lung injury, ventilation, hemodynamics, education, renal failure by Peter Andrews( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Year in review in Intensive Care Medicine--2003 Part 1: Respiratory failure, infection and sepsis by Edward Abraham( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Year in review in Intensive Care Medicine, 2006. I. Experimental studies. Clinical studies: brain injury, renal failure and endocrinology by Peter Andrews( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Atlanto-occipital dislocation in a patient presenting with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a case report and literature review by Martin Rief( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Year in review in Intensive Care Medicine, 2006. II. Infections and sepsis, haemodynamics, elderly, invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilation, weaning, ARDS by Peter Andrews( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effect of intensive care after cardiac arrest on patient outcome: a database analysis by Andreas Schober( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Year in Review in Intensive Care Medicine, 2006. III. Circulation, ethics, cancer, outcome, education, nutrition, and pediatric and neonatal critical care by Peter Andrews( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Year in review in intensive care medicine, 2005. III. Nutrition, pediatric and neonatal critical care, and experimental by Peter Andrews( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nonelective surgery at night and in-hospital mortality( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that sleep deprivation associated with night-time working may adversely affect performance resulting in a reduction in the safety of surgery and anaesthesia. OBJECTIVE: Our primary objective was to evaluate an association between nonelective night-time surgery and in-hospital mortality. We hypothesised that urgent surgery performed during the night was associated with higher in-hospital mortality and also an increase in the duration of hospital stay and the number of admissions to critical care. DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. This is a secondary analysis of a large database related to perioperative care and outcome (European Surgical Outcome Study). SETTING: Four hundred and ninety-eight hospitals in 28 European countries. PATIENTS: Men and women older than 16 years who underwent nonelective, noncardiac surgery were included according to time of the procedure. INTERVENTION: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality; the secondary outcome was the duration of hospital stay and critical care admission. RESULTS: Eleven thousand two hundred and ninety patients undergoing urgent surgery were included in the analysis with 636 in-hospital deaths (5.6%). Crude mortality odds ratios (ORs) increased sequentially from daytime [426 deaths (5.3%)] to evening [150 deaths (6.0%), OR 1.14; 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.38] to night-time [60 deaths (8.3%), OR 1.62; 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.14]. Following adjustment for confounding factors, surgery during the evening (OR 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.31) and night (OR 1.20; 95% confidence interval 0.9 to 1.6) was not associated with an increased risk of postoperative death. Admittance rate to an ICU increased sequentially from daytime [891 (11.1%)], to evening [347 (13.8%)] to night time [149 (20.6%)]. CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing nonelective urgent noncardiac surgery, in-hospital mortality was associated with well known risk factors related to patients and surgery, but we did not identify any relationship with the time of day at which the procedure was performed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01203605 Abstract : Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text
 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
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  General Special  
Audience level: 0.97 (from 0.88 for Nonelectiv ... to 0.97 for Hemodynami ...)

Languages
English (14)