WorldCat Identities

Docquier, Frédéric

Overview
Works: 187 works in 382 publications in 3 languages and 2,245 library holdings
Genres: Cross-cultural studies  History 
Roles: Author, Contributor, Editor, Other, Opponent, Thesis advisor, Honoree
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 304.8
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Frédéric Docquier
A gendered assessment of the brain drain by Frédéric Docquier( )

10 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 421 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: This paper updates and extends the Docquier-Marfouk data set on inter-national migration by educational attainment. The authors use new sources, homogenize definitions of what a migrant is, and compute gender-disaggregated indicators of the brain drain. Emigration stocks and rates are provided by level of schooling and gender for 195 source countries in 1990 and 2000. The data set can be used to capture the recent trend in women's skilled migration and to analyze its causes and consequences for developing countries. The findings show that women represent an increasing share of the OECD immigration stock and exhibit relatively higher rates of brain drain than men. The gender gap in skilled migration is strongly correlated with the gender gap in educational attainment at origin. Equating women's and men's access to education would probably reduce gender differences in the brain drain
Is Migration A Good Substitute For Education Subsidies? by Frédéric Docquier( )

7 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 389 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: Assuming a given educational policy, the recent brain drain literature reveals that skilled migration can boost the average level of schooling in developing countries. This paper introduces educational subsidies determined by governments concerned by the number of skilled workers remaining in the country. The theoretical analysis shows that developing countries can benefit from skilled emigration when educational subsidies entail high fiscal distortions. However when taxes are not too distortionary, it is desirable to impede emigration and subsidize education. The authors investigate the empirical relationship between educational subsidies and migration prospects, obtaining a negative relationship for 105 countries. Based on this result, the analysis revisits the country specific effects of skilled migration upon human capital. The findings show that the endogeneity of public subsidies reduces the number of winners and increases the magnitude of the losses
The wage effects of immigration and emigration by Frédéric Docquier( )

15 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper, we simulate the long-run effects of migrant flows on wages of high-skilled and low-skilled non-migrants in a set of countries using an aggregate model of national economies. New in this literature we calculate the wage effect of emigration as well as immigration. We focus on Europe and compare the outcomes for large Western European countries with those of other key destination countries both in the OECD and outside the OECD. Our analysis builds on an improved database of bilateral stocks and net migration flows of immigrants and emigrants by education level for the years 1990 through 2000. We find that all European countries experienced a decrease in their average wages and a worsening of their wage inequality because of emigration. Whereas, contrary to the popular belief, immigration had nearly equal but opposite effects: positive on average wages and reducing wage inequality of non-movers. These patterns hold true using a range of parameters for our simulations, accounting for the estimates of undocumented immigrants, and correcting for the quality of schooling and/or labor-market downgrading of skills. In terms of wage outcomes, it follows that prevalent public fears in European countries are misplaced; immigration has had a positive average wage effect on native workers. Some concerns should be focused on the wage effect of emigration, instead
Emigration and Democracy by Frédéric Docquier( )

11 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and German and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Migration is an important yet neglected determinant of institutions. This paper documents the channels through which emigration affects home country institutions and considers dynamic-panel regressions for a large sample of developing countries. The authors find that emigration and human capital both increase democracy and economic freedom. This implies that unskilled (skilled) emigration has a positive (ambiguous) impact on institutional quality. Simulations show an impact of skilled emigration that is generally positive, significant for a few countries and for many countries once incentive effects of emigration on human capital formation are accounted for
Skilled migration : the perspective of developing countries by Frédéric Docquier( )

9 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Docquier and Rapoport focus on the consequences of skilled migration for developing countries. They first present new evidence on the magnitude of migration of skilled workers at the international level and then discuss its direct and indirect effects on human capital formation in developing countries in a unified stylized model. Finally they turn to policy implications, with emphasis on migration and education policy in a context of globalized labor markets. This paper--a product of the Trade Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to measure and understand the implication of the brain drain as part of the International Migration and Development Program"--World Bank web site
A Global Assessment of Human Capital Mobility: The Role of Non-OECD Destinations by Erhan Artuç( )

5 editions published between 2012 and 2015 in English and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discussions of high-skilled mobility typically evoke migration patterns from poorer to wealthier countries, which ignore movements to and between developing countries. This paper presents, for the first time, a global overview of human capital mobility through bilateral migration stocks by gender and education in 1990 and 2000, and calculation of nuanced brain drain indicators. Building on newly collated data, we use a novel estimation procedure based on a pseudo-gravity model. We identify key determinants of international migration, which we subsequently use to impute missing data. Non-OECD destinations account for one-third of skilled-migration, while OECD destinations are declining in relative importance
Measuring skilled migration rates : the case of small states by Frédéric Docquier( )

7 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and Undetermined and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstract: "Recent changes in information and communication technologies have contributed to a dramatic increase in the degree of integration and interdependency of countries, markets, and people. Against this background, one aspect of particular concern for small states is the international movement of people. This paper focuses on this particularly important aspect of globalization, with emphasis on the movement of skilled people and its relationship with country size. In addition to overall skilled migration, it provides evidence that controls for migration age in order to distinguish between those educated in the home country and those educated abroad. The authors discuss the growth implications of the brain drain from small countries and policies that may help control it."--World Bank web site
Measuring the international mobility of skilled workers (1990-2000) : release 1.0 by Frédéric Docquier( )

7 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Caribbean, Central America, and Western and Eastern Africa. Repeating the exercise for 1990 and 2000 allows the authors to evaluate the changes in brain drain intensity. Western Africa, Eastern Africa, and Central America experienced a remarkable increase in the brain drain during the past decade. The database delivers information that is rich enough to assess the changes in the international distribution of migration rates, to test for the (push and pull) determinants per skill group, to evaluate the growth effects of migration on source and destination countries, and to estimate the relationships between migration, trade, foreign research and development, and remittances. This paper a product of the Trade Team, Development Research Group is part of a larger effort in the group to measure the extent of the brain drain as part of the International Migration and Development Program"--World Bank web site
Croissance et convergence économiques des régions : théorie, faits et déterminants( Book )

5 editions published in 2000 in French and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Skilled migration : the perspective of developing countries by Frédéric Docquier( )

3 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Docquier and Rapoport focus on the consequences of skilled migration for developing countries. They first present new evidence on the magnitude of migration of skilled workers at the international level and then discuss its direct and indirect effects on human capital formation in developing countries in a unified stylized model. Finally they turn to policy implications, with emphasis on migration and education policy in a context of globalized labor markets. This paper--a product of the Trade Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to measure and understand the implication of the brain drain as part of the International Migration and Development Program"--World Bank web site
Measuring the international mobility of skilled workers (1990-2000) : release 1.0 by Frédéric Docquier( )

2 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Minants per skill group, to evaluate the growth effects of migration on source and destination countries, and to estimate the relationships between migration, trade, foreign research and development, and remittances. This paper a product of the Trade Team, Development Research Group is part of a larger effort in the group to measure the extent of the brain drain as part of the International Migration and Development Program"--World Bank web site
La solidarité entre les régions : bilan et perspectives( Book )

3 editions published in 1999 in French and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Diasporas by Michel Beine( )

9 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Migration flows are shaped by a complex combination of self-selection and out-selection mechanisms. In this paper, the authors analyze how existing diasporas (the stock of people born in a country and living in another one) affect the size and human-capital structure of current migration flows. The analysis exploits a bilateral data set on international migration by educational attainment from 195 countries to 30 developed countries in 1990 and 2000. Based on simple micro-foundations and controlling for various determinants of migration, the analysis finds that diasporas increase migration flows, lower the average educational level and lead to higher concentration of low-skill migrants. Interestingly, diasporas explain the majority of the variability of migration flows and selection. This suggests that, without changing the generosity of family reunion programs, education-based selection rules are likely to have a moderate impact. The results are highly robust to the econometric techniques, accounting for the large proportion of zeros and endogeneity problems
International migration, transfers of norms and home country fertility by Michel Beine( )

10 editions published between 2008 and 2012 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the relationship between international migration and source country fertility. The impact of international migration on source country fertility may have a number of causes, including a transfer of destination countries’ fertility norms and an incentive to acquire more education. We provide a rigorous test of the diffusion of fertility norms using original and detailed data on migration. Our results provide evidence of a strong transfer of fertility norms from migrants to their country of origin. -- International migration ; endogenous fertility ; human capital ; social norms
Diaspora Effects in International Migration Key Questions and Methodological Issues by Michel Beine( )

7 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper reviews the existing literature on the impact of migrants networks on the patterns of international migration. It covers the theoretical channels at stake in the global effect of the networks. It identifies the key issues, namely the impact on size, selection and concentration of the migration flows. The paper also reviews the empirical hurdles that the researchers face in assessing the importance of networks. The key issues concern the choice of micro vs a macro approach, the definition of a network, the access to suitable data and the adoption of econometric methods accounting for the main features of those data. Finally, the paper reports a set of estimation outcomes reflecting the main findings of the macro approach
Brain drain in globalization : a general equilibrium analysis from the sending countries' perspective by Luca Marchiori( )

7 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The paper assesses the global effects of brain drain on developing economies and quantifies the relative sizes of various static and dynamic impacts. By constructing a unified generic framework characterized by overlapping-generations dynamics and calibrated to real data, this study incorporates many direct impacts of brain drain whose interactions, along with other indirect effects, are endogenously and dynamically generated. Our findings suggest that the short-run impact of brain drain on resident human capital is extremely crucial, as it does not only determine the number of skilled workers available to domestic production, but it also affects the sending economy's capacity to innovate or to adopt modern technologies. The latter impact plays an important role particularly in a globalized economy where capital investments are made in places with higher production efficiencies ceteris paribus. Hence, in spite of several empirically documented positive feedback effects, those countries with high skilled emigration rates are the most candid victims to brain drain since they are least likely to benefit from the "brain gain" effect, and thus suffering from declines of their resident human capital. -- Brain drain ; capital flow ; development ; human capital ; remittances
Measuring skilled migration rates the case of small states by Frédéric Docquier( )

2 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent changes in information and communication technologies have contributed to a dramatic increase in the degree of integration and interdependency of countries, markets, and people. Against this background, one aspect of particular concern for small states is the international movement of people. This paper focuses on this particularly important aspect of globalization, with emphasis on the movement of skilled people and its relationship with country size. In addition to overall skilled migration, it provides evidence that controls for migration age in order to distinguish between those educated in the home country and those educated abroad. The authors discuss the growth implications of the brain drain from small countries and policies that may help control it
Globalization, brain drain and development by Frédéric Docquier( )

4 editions published in 2011 in English and German and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper reviews four decades of economics research on the brain drain, with a focus on recent contributions and on development issues. We first assess the magnitude, intensity and determinants of the brain drain, showing that brain drain (or high-skill) migration is becoming the dominant pattern of international migration and a major aspect of globalization. We then use a stylized growth model to analyze the various channels through which a brain drain affects the sending countries and review the evidence on these channels. The recent empirical literature shows that high-skill emigration need not deplete a country?s human capital stock and can generate positive network externalities. Three case studies are also considered: the African medical brain drain, the recent exodus of European scientists to the United States, and the role of the Indian diaspora in the development of India?s IT sector. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of the analysis for education, immigration, and international taxation policies in a global context
The economics of international migration by Giovanni Peri( )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Economics of International Migration is a collection of the fundamental articles written by Giovanni Peri on the economic determinants and consequences of international migration. These papers have provided the theoretical framework and empirical analysis for a rethinking of the economics of migration, going beyond the Canonical model of labor demand and supply used until the 1990s. Beginning with a simple model that recognizes the differences between immigrants and natives as workers, the articles develop the analysis of complementarity, specialization and productivity effect of immigrants in developed economies. The book then presents a series of papers analyzing and testing the economic motivation for international migration. Finally, the focus is shifted to the effect of immigration policies and their consequences on immigration and the economy.--
On the robustness of brain gain estimates by Michel Beine( )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent theoretical studies suggest that migration prospects can raise the expected return to human capital and thus foster education investment at home or, in other words, induce a brain gain. In a recent paper (Beine, Docquier and Rapoport, Economic Journal, 2008) we used the Docquier and Marfouk (2006) data set on emigration rates by education level to examine the impact of brain drain migration on gross (pre-migration) human capital formation in developing countries. We found a positive effect of skilled migration prospects on human capital growth in a cross-section of 127 developing countries, with an elasticity of about 5 percent. In this paper we assess the robustness of our results to the use of alternative brain drain measures, definitions of human capital, and functional forms. We find that the results hold using the Beine et al. (2007) alternative brain drain measures controlling for whether migrants acquired their skills in the home or in the host country. We also regress other indicators of human capital investment on skilled migration rates and find a positive effect on youth literacy while the effect on school enrolment depends on the exact specification chosen
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Alternative Names
Docquier, F.

Docquier, Fr.

Frédéric Docquier economist (Université Catholique de Louvain)

Frédéric Docquier économiste belge

Frédéric Docquier econoom

Frédéric Docquier umano

Frédéric Docquier Wirtschaftswissenschaftler (Macroeconomist service des études et de la statistique de Ministère de la Region wallonne)

Languages
English (116)

French (8)

German (2)