WorldCat Identities

Smokejumpers and Forest Fire Fighters Oral History Project

Overview
Works: 29 works in 29 publications in 1 language and 57 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  Personal narratives‡vAmerican  History  Biographies 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Smokejumpers and Forest Fire Fighters Oral History Project
R.P. "Dick" Wilcomb interview by R. P Wilcomb( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

R.P. "Dick" Wilcomb discusses his experience as a smokejumper in McCall, Idaho, in 1947. He also talks about packing parachutes, which he did during the year he was in McCall. After leaving smokejumping, Wilcomb briefly attended the University of Idaho. He later worked in the construction field on various projects for Morrison-Knudsen on the Snake River, including the Bliss Power Plant, among others. Wilcomb also talks about construction of the Salt Lake Hardware Building (currently the Boise Public Library.)
Bernie Nielsen interview by Bernie Nielsen( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nielsen discusses his experience as a smokejumper in McCall, Idaho, from 1947 through 1950. He further discusses co-workers he jumped with in the Boise, Payette, and Nez Perce national forests and includes descriptions of small towns surrounding these forests
Jim Larkin interviews by Jim Larkin( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Larkin discusses his long flying career fighting forest fires, beginning in 1949. He also flew during World War II through the Civilian Pilot Training program and later flew smokejumpers in the McCall, Idaho, area. He has traveled all over the world as a pilot, including India, China, and Canada. Larkin thereafter worked for the U.S. Forest Service in several different positions as a pilot before he retired in 1978. To this day, Larkin continues to teach pilots at the seminars offered by McCall Mountain Canyon Flying, LLC. Larkin was in a film produced by the Canadian Discovery Channel entitled, "Flightpath III: Wild Wings" and is also mentioned in a book written by Bud Filler, "Two-Man Stick."
Stanton "Stan" Tate interviews by Stan Tate( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Donald R. "Don" Reed interview by Donald R Reed( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reed discusses his career working for the U.S. Forest Service in the Boise National Forest from 1955 to 1988. Reed describes the different positions he held during that time. He lived in Idaho City during the 1950s through the 1970s. After Reed retired in 1988, he purchased a sailboat and sailed the Pacific Ocean before returning to the U.S. in the fall of 1994
Leo Cromwell interview by Leo Cromwell( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cromwell describes in detail both the McCall and the Idaho City smokejumper bases where he was a smokejumper from the early 1960s through 1997. Cromwell was a native of Cascade, Idaho, the compiler and creator of "Who's Who in Region 4 Smokejumping, 1943-1997," and taught history and mathematics in Cambridge and Boise when not fighting fires during the summer
Gene Crosby interviews by Gene Crosby( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crosby describes smokejumping and piloting smokejumpers in Idaho and New Mexico during the 1950s and 1960s. He is an experienced backcountry pilot also. Prior to smokejumping and flying, Crosby spent a summer in the 1950s working in northern Idaho on a blister rust program. Originally from Oklahoma, he received two degrees in agriculture from the Oklahoma State University (previously Oklahoma A & M). Crosby is a seasoned writer and describes various stories and commercials he has written during his lifetime. Crosby discussed the time period from the 1950s through 2001
Bert Strom interviews by Bert Strom( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Strom describes numerous positions he held while working for the U.S. Forest Service for forty years (1956-1996). He worked at the St. Joe National Forest, Salmon National Forest, and the Boise National Forest. Strom gives a very detailed description of how all the different fire agencies, including national ones and the BLM, actually work together
Ted and Joy Koskella interviews( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ted Koskella describes the numerous positions he held with the U.S. Forest Service from the early 1930s until his retirement in 1976. Topics include his World War II service as a Navy pilot; attending Oregon State University where he received a degree in forestry; work as a lookout at the Payette National Forest; and service in many other locations, including Oregon; Utah; Washington, D.C.; New Mexico; Wyoming; California; and Idaho. His wife, Joy Koskella, worked along side him as an unpaid volunteer and both express their dedication to the national forests and their pride in having contributed to them
Roger "Rod" Davidson interviews by Roger Davidson( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Davidson discusses his experience working as a smokejumper in Idaho during the summers of 1947 through 1950. During the winters he attended both Washington State University and the University of Idaho where he obtained his degree in 1950. Davidson then attended the American Institute for Foreign Trade in Phoenix, Ariz. The training he received from that institution landed him a job with Mobil Oil Company in southern California. In 1963 he transferred to Boise, Idaho. While he was employed with Mobil Oil, he was also co-owner and accountant for the Brass Lamp Pizza parlors. In the 1960s and 1970s, Davidson bought property for the Brass Lamp Pizza parlors. He also bought property in McCall and Boise, including a building at 6th and Main in Boise
Gene McVey interview by Gene McVey( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

McVey describes his experiences fighting fire on a Hot Shot Crew, which he did in 1961 and 1962 in Idaho. McVey, who is originally from Twin Falls, Idaho, paints a very descriptive picture of places where he fought fires, including areas around the towns of McCall, Ketchum, Hailey, and Sun Valley. He describes how, during the 1962 season, he witnessed two deaths on two different fires
Jeff Fereday interviews by Jeff Fereday( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fereday discusses his work for the U.S. Forest Service, 1968-1975. He describes his experiences working as both a "hot shot" and as a smokejumper on fires in Idaho, New Mexico, California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska. After completing law school at Columbia University, he worked as a law clerk for the Idaho Conservation League and later as an attorney in Boise focusing on environmental issues. Fereday also describes smokejumpers' attitudes in the early 1970s about the Vietnam War
Reid Jackson interview by Reid Jackson( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Larry Moore interview by Larry Moore( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Moore describes the various programs he worked on with the U.S. Forest Service. He jumped on fires in Idaho, Alaska, Montana, New Mexico, and Nevada. Moore also describes other non-jumping positions he had in Jackson Hole, Wyo., and also during the 1964 riot in West Yellowstone. Originally from Oklahoma, Moore received his degree in botany from the University of Arizona and was employed with Fire-Trol Holdings, LLC at the time of the interview
Tommy "Shep" Johnson interviews by Tommy Johnson( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Johnson discusses his experience working as a smokejumper in Idaho, New Mexico, and Alaska from 1956 to 1962. He discusses his life before smokejumping while he was in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1950 to 1955, including his experience during the Korean War. Johnson was recruited to work for the CIA, kicking cargo, in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War from 1962 to 1975. Upon his return to the U.S., he worked for the Bureau of Land Management from 1976 until he retired in 1990 after a truck accident
Gordon Stevens interview by Gordon J Stevens( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stevens discusses his experiences as a smoke-chaser, forester, and various positions he held with the Forest Service. He also discusses the forestry and timber classes he took while at Utah State University, where he eventually obtained his master's degree. Stevens has more than thirty years experience regarding various fires around the U.S. and still works as a fire management consultant
Robert Montoya interviews by Robert Montoya( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Montoya describes in detail the McCall, Idaho City, and Boise, Idaho, smokejumper bases, where he was a smokejumper from the early 1960s until 3 Jan. 1979. Montoya began his smokejumping career as a lookout in New Mexico in the late 1950s. Included are detailed descriptions of fires, dates, places, and individuals' names
John Krebs interviews by John Daniel Krebs( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Krebs describes in detail his various positions with the U.S. Forest Service, the majority (thirty years) of which he spent in the Palouse fire district. As a previous fire behavior analyst, Krebs explains both pros and cons about prescribed burning in the national forests. Krebs was originally from Kansas, where he received his degree in chemistry from the University of Kansas
Elmer and Wilma Huston interview( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Elmer and Wilma Huston talk about their years spent being a (or being the wife of a) U.S. Forest Service employee (1940s-1976). Elmer Huston worked in fire control, including a couple of years as a smokejumper. Both Hustons worked on a fire lookout and at a guard station (although only Elmer's work was paid). The Hustons discuss changes in the forest service since Elmer retired, particularly how it affected forest fire fighting
Harold Eshelman interviews by Harold Eshelman( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Eshelman describes his fourteen years working for the U.S. Forest Service (1957-1971). He worked on ten-month contracts and never received permanent work. Eshelman's career began working on the Scott Mountain lookout in 1961. After the lookout position, Eshelman worked many different jobs for the Forest Service, including working on the brush crew and as recreational patrolman. He fought eighty-six fires in three different districts in the Boise National Forest (Landmark, Garden Valley and Idaho City) and the Donner Summit fire on the Nevada/California border
 
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Alternative Names
Idaho State Historical Society. Smokejumpers and Forest Fire Fighters Oral History Project

Languages
English (20)