WorldCat Identities

Lomberg, Jon 1948-

Overview
Works: 16 works in 27 publications in 3 languages and 3,186 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  Science fiction  Science television programs  Educational television programs  Popular works  Nonfiction television programs  Documentary television programs  Documentary films  Pictorial works  Popular music 
Roles: Animator , Narrator, Author
Classifications: PS3569.A287, 813.54
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about Jon Lomberg
 
Most widely held works by Jon Lomberg
Contact : a novel by Carl Sagan( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 2,812 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beautiful astrophysicist Rebecca Blake deciphers long-awaited signals from space, persuades world leaders to construct a machine that many consider a Trojan Horse, and journeys into space for an epochal encounter
Death of a star by Robin Bates( Visual )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 277 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Supernovas are as spectacular as they are rare. In early 1987, a giant star exploded in the sky -- one of the most violent celestial events since the creation of the universe ... Why did this phenomenon fascinate, baffle, and delight astronomers? What causes a star to explode? How will these energy blasts help us understand our universe?"--Container
The Voyager golden record by Glenn Gould( Recording )

3 editions published in 2017 in Multiple languages and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1977, NASA launched two spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, on a grand tour of the solar system and into the mysteries of interstellar space. Attached to each of these probes is a beautiful golden record containing a message for any extraterrestrial intelligence that might encounter it, perhaps billions of years from now. This enchanting artifact, officially called the Voyager Interstellar Record, may be the last vestige of our civilization after we are gone forever. The Golden Record tells a story of our planet expressed in sounds, images, and science: Earth's greatest music from myriad peoples and eras, from Bach and Beethoven to Blind Willie Johnson and Chuck Berry, Benin percussion to Solomon Island panpipes. Natural sounds--birds, a train, a baby's cry, a kiss--are collaged into a lovely audio poem called "Sounds of Earth." There are spoken greetings in dozens of human languages--and one whale language--and more than 100 images encoded in analog that depict who, and what, we are. Astronomer and science educator Carl Sagan chaired the Voyager Interstellar Record Committee that created this object, which is both an inspired scientific effort and a compelling piece of conceptual art. Astronomer Frank Drake, father of the scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), was the technical director, writer and novelist Ann Druyan was the creative director, science journalist and author Timothy Ferris produced the record, space artist Jon Lomberg was the designer, and artist Linda Salzman Sagan organized the greetings. As we embarked on our own Kickstarter project to make the golden record available on vinyl for the first time, in celebration of Voyager's 40th anniversary, we realized that we saw the original artifact through three different lenses. As an exquisitely curated music compilation, the Voyager record is an inviting port of entry to unfamiliar yet entrancing sounds from other cultures and other times. As an objet d'art and design, it represents deep insights about communication, context, and the power of media. In the realm of science, it raises fundamental questions about who we are and our place in the universe. At the intersection of those three perspectives, the Voyager record is a testament to the potential of science and art to ignite humanity's sense of curiosity and wonder. Voyager 1 entered interstellar space in 2012. As of this writing, it's almost 21 billion kilometers away from Earth. Speeding along at 17 kilometers per second, it will take another 40,000 years before the spacecraft passes within 1.6 light-years of a star in the constellation Camelopardalis. The slightly slower Voyager 2 is at the outermost edge of our solar system, where the sun's plasma wind blows against cosmic dust and gas. Soon, it too will venture into interstellar space. We may never know whether an extraterrestrial civilization ever listens to the golden record. It was a gift from humanity to the cosmos. But it is also a gift to humanity. The record embodies a sense of possibility and hope. And it's as relevant now as it was in 1977. Perhaps even more so... The Voyager Interstellar Record is a reminder of what we can achieve when we are at our best--and that our future really is up to all of us.-- Publisher's website
Murmurs of earth : the Voyager interstellar record by Carl Sagan( Recording )

8 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1977, two extraordinary spacecraft called Voyager were launched to the stars. Affixed to each Voyager craft was a gold-coated copper phonograph record as a message to possible extra-terrestrial civilizations that might encounter the spacecraft in some distant space and time. Each record contained 118 photographs of the planet; almost 90 minutes of the world's greatest music; an evolutionary audio essay on 'The Sounds of Earth'; and greetings in almost sixty human languages. This book is an account, written by those chiefly responsible for the contents of the Voyager Record, of why they did it, how they selected the repertoire, and precisely what the record contains
Worlds unnumbered : the search for extrasolar planets by Donald Goldsmith( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Through four decades of space exploration and ever-better telescopes, astronomers have searched in vain, unable to find even a single planet orbiting any of the myriad of sunlike stars strewn through the Milky Way. All of this changed in October 1995, when astronomers announced the first planet discovered orbiting another sunlike star. Worlds Unnumbered captures the excitement and explains the significance of these new worlds, with an up-to-the-last-planet account that gives the general reader a vivid picture of the new planets - planets that have already amazed astronomers for their colossal size and orbits that seem impossibly close to their respective suns. Many of the new planets are more massive than Jupiter, yet orbit their stars at distances far less than the distance of the sun to its closest planet. With theories of planet formation, the immense difficulties of observing extrasolar planets, and the prospects for future discoveries of Earthlike planets, Worlds Unnumbered's fast-paced narrative provides its readers with key insights into the question that has fascinated humanity for millennia: Are we alone in the cosmos? And if not, how far must we look to find our closest neighbor?
The Voyager golden record( Recording )

2 editions published in 2017 in Multiple languages and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1977, NASA launched two spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, on a grand tour of the solar system and into the mysteries of interstellar space. Attached to each of these probes is a beautiful golden record containing a message for any extraterrestrial intelligence that might encounter it, perhaps billions of years from now. This enchanting artifact, officially called the Voyager Interstellar Record, may be the last vestige of our civilization after we are gone forever. The Golden Record tells a story of our planet expressed in sounds, images, and science: Earth's greatest music from myriad peoples and eras, from Bach and Beethoven to Blind Willie Johnson and Chuck Berry, Benin percussion to Solomon Island panpipes. Natural sounds--birds, a train, a baby's cry, a kiss--are collaged into a lovely audio poem called "Sounds of Earth." There are spoken greetings in dozens of human languages--and one whale language--and more than 100 images encoded in analog that depict who, and what, we are. Astronomer and science educator Carl Sagan chaired the Voyager Interstellar Record Committee that created this object, which is both an inspired scientific effort and a compelling piece of conceptual art. Astronomer Frank Drake, father of the scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), was the technical director, writer and novelist Ann Druyan was the creative director, science journalist and author Timothy Ferris produced the record, space artist Jon Lomberg was the designer, and artist Linda Salzman Sagan organized the greetings. As we embarked on our own Kickstarter project to make the golden record available on vinyl for the first time, in celebration of Voyager's 40th anniversary, we realized that we saw the original artifact through three different lenses. As an exquisitely curated music compilation, the Voyager record is an inviting port of entry to unfamiliar yet entrancing sounds from other cultures and other times. As an objet d'art and design, it represents deep insights about communication, context, and the power of media. In the realm of science, it raises fundamental questions about who we are and our place in the universe. At the intersection of those three perspectives, the Voyager record is a testament to the potential of science and art to ignite humanity's sense of curiosity and wonder. Voyager 1 entered interstellar space in 2012. As of this writing, it's almost 21 billion kilometers away from Earth. Speeding along at 17 kilometers per second, it will take another 40,000 years before the spacecraft passes within 1.6 light-years of a star in the constellation Camelopardalis. The slightly slower Voyager 2 is at the outermost edge of our solar system, where the sun's plasma wind blows against cosmic dust and gas. Soon, it too will venture into interstellar space. We may never know whether an extraterrestrial civilization ever listens to the golden record. It was a gift from humanity to the cosmos. But it is also a gift to humanity. The record embodies a sense of possibility and hope. And it's as relevant now as it was in 1977. Perhaps even more so ... The Voyager Interstellar Record is a reminder of what we can achieve when we are at our best--and that our future really is up to all of us.-- Publisher's website
Portrait of the milky way. by Jon Lomberg( Visual )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Running hot and cold : the climate controversy by Jon Lomberg( Recording )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A five-part series featuring leading claimatologists from Canada and the United States discussing climate change, weather control, and related topics
Archive of materials and memorabilia from the Voyager Missions and Encounters by Jon Lomberg( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Together to Mars? : the Planetary Society SPACEBRIDGE, Moscow, USSR - Boulder, USA, July 18th, 1987( Visual )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Science education by Ann Druyan( Recording )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chigu ŭi soksagim by Carl Sagan( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in Korean and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Preface: On August 20th and September 5th, 1977, two extraordinary spacecraft called Voyager were launched to the stars. After what promises to be a detailed and thoroughly dramatic exploration of the outer solar system from Jupiter to Uranus between 1979 and 1986, these space vehicles will slowly leave the solar systems - emissaries of the Earth to the realm of the stars. Affixed to each Voyager craft is a gold-coated copper phonograph record as a message to possible extra-terrestrial civilizations that might encounter the spacecraft in some distant space and time. Each record contains 118 photographs of our planet, ourselves and our civilization; almost 90 minutes of the world's greatest music; and evolutionary audio essay on "The Sounds of Earth"; and greetings in almost sixty human languages (and one whale language), including salutations from the President of the United States and the Secretary General of the United Nations. This book is an account, written by those chiefly responsible for the contents of the Voyager Record, of why we did it, how we selected the repertoire, and precisely what the record contains
Virtual journeys( Recording )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mix the magic of radio with a healthy imagination and you can go anywhere. IDEAS has taken listeners around the world, into space, and back into time
Visions of Mars : a cultural and scientific experiment on Mars '96 by Louis D Friedman( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Portrait of the Milky Way by Jon Lomberg( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.17 (from 0.13 for Together t ... to 0.91 for Chigu ŭi ...)

Covers
Worlds unnumbered : the search for extrasolar planets
Alternative Names
Jon Lomberg American artist and journalist

Jon Lomberg artista estadounidense

Jon Lomberg artista estatunidenc

Jon Lomberg artista estauxunidense

Jon Lomberg artista norte-americano

Jon Lomberg artista statunitense

Jon Lomberg artiste américain

ג'ון לומברג

چون لومبيرج

ジョン・ロンバーグ

Languages