WorldCat Identities

Barcus, Francis Earle 1927-

Overview
Works: 34 works in 106 publications in 1 language and 1,815 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HQ784.T4, 791.455
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Francis Earle Barcus
Images of life on children's television : sex roles, minorities, and families by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

9 editions published between 1983 and 1984 in English and held by 676 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Children's television : an analysis of programming and advertising by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

12 editions published in 1977 in English and Undetermined and held by 636 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The studies reported in this book are content analyses of children's television and attendant advertising. Following an introductory statement, chapters present data about children's commercial television on the weekends, children's commercial television after school, and the seasonal variations in television advertising to children. A concluding statement says that change is needed and that the industry and the public must question the failure of television to live up to its potential. Nine appendixes of information related to the studies and 122 tables of data are included. (Rl)
Communications content : analysis of the research, 1900-1958 : a content analysis of content analysis by Francis Earle Barcus( )

22 editions published between 1959 and 1983 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Concerned parents speak out on children's television by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

4 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research investigated parents' opinions about children's television (tv). Questionnaire respondents were mainly parents of children ages 2-6; mothers outnumbered fathers 9:1. Results included the findings that children watched tv an average of three hours a day; this varied little throughout the country and between those viewing Public Broadcasting Service (pbs) and those watching commercial programs. Younger children preferred the former, older the latter. Parents gave overwhelming support to pbs, especially to Sesame Street, Mister Rogers and Electric Company, rating these superior to their commercial competitors. Ninety-six percent of the parents favored changing practices regarding commercials on children's tv, with 40% wanting their elimination, 25% a reduction, and 25% a clustering of commercials at the end of programs. Annoyance was expressed over toy commercials and the quality of the toys themselves. Most parents felt tv was influential; they thought tv, especially pbs, taught communication skills, enhanced social learning and broadened interests. They also felt tv had too much violence and materialism and that certain programs could foster passivity and anti-social behavior. Negative concerns were greatest among parents whose children watched tv most heavily and who concentrated upon commercial programs. (Author/PB)
Television in the after school hours : a study of programming and advertising for children on independent stations across the United States by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

4 editions published in 1975 in English and Undetermined and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study analyzed the programing and advertising matter in the after-school hours on independent commercial television stations unaffiliated with the major networks. These stations, primarily uhf, relied almost entirely on syndicated programing that is often reruns of former network programs. These programs draw large after-school audiences. By collecting many different categories of data, an overall picture of independent station programing across the U.S., and an in-depth look at a sample of these stations through actual videotape recording and analysis were obtained. These procedures yielded data for 350 program segments broadcast on 68 of 73 independent tv stations in 43 markets. Analysis revealed a process of relabeling programs produced for prime time tv as "children's television." Approximately 60% of all programs were not originally designed for children. Nearly two-thirds of the audience for these programs were children 2-11 years old. About 20% of the viewing time is devoted to commercials, most of which contained little product information; 46% of these commercials were for edibles, usually for food with high sugar content. Appendixes and data tables throughout document the narrative of the extensive research report. (Hb)
Weekend commercial children's television - 1975 by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Saturday children's television : a report of TV programming and advertising on Boston commercial television by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

6 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Saturday children's television programming in Boston was monitored and videotaped so that the content could be analyzed for a study to gather data relevant to content and commercial practices. Some of the major findings were that overall, about 77 percent of time is devoted to program content and 23 percent to announcements of various kinds; that commercial announcements (CA's)--product and program promotion--account for almost 19 percent of total time; that there were more commercials within programs than between programs; that CA's were evenly divided among four major categories--toys, cereals, candy, and other foods; that CA's appear to have both sexual and racial biases; and that little product information is given in the CA's. Other findings were that noncommercial announcements were primarily either youth-oriented or for medical or environmental causes, and some of these did not appear to be appropriate for children. Also, when individual cartoons and other program segments were studied in detail for subject matter, it was found that 64 percent of the dramatic programming was in some sense violent, while 67 percent of nondramatic segments dealt with science and technology, race and nationality, literature and fine arts, and nature. However, 77 percent of total programming was drama, with only 12 percent informational. (SH)
Commercial children's television on weekends and weekday afternoons : a content analysis of children's programming and advertising broadcast in October, 1977 by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

7 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pre-Christmas advertising to children : a comparison of the advertising content of children's programs broadcast in April and November of 1975 by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Food advertising on children's television : an analysis of appeals and nutritional content by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The role of agricultural extension in the suburban community by Francis Earle Barcus( )

4 editions published in 1962 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alumni administration, with additional analyses of trends in alumni giving at 141 institutions; a report of the 50 colleges study by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

2 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Romper room; an analysis by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

3 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Video-tape recordings of the Romper Room program carried by TV station WEMT, Bangor, Maine were examined in an attempt to classify and describe various program elements. Tapes were monitored to obtain descriptions of program activities and to focus on some of the commercial announcements. For the total week studied, more than one-third (36%) of all program time was spent in "toy play" which involved playing with, demonstrating, or exhibiting various brand-name manufactured toys in other than identifiable commercial announcements. Lessons were the second most frequent activity, followed by cartoons, games played without the aid of toys, reading aloud to children and miscellaneous talk by the hostess. Approximately 81 per cent of all time was "live" from the studio, with the remaining 19 per cent devoted to recorded material, comprised of film, cartoons, filmed commercials and credits. Formal commercial product announcements and program promotion ranged from 7 to 11 per cent of total time on various days and averaged to 9 percent for the week. However, if one includes toy play, in which toy products were prominently displayed and demonstrated, as well as commercial credits, plus all formal commercial announcements, then 47 per cent of the time for the week was devoted to commercial content. All of the toys which could be identified by manufacturer were Hasbrow or Romper Room toys. This pattern seems too outstanding to be mere coincidence. The author concludes on the basis of the data of this study, that a major purpose of the program is to promote its toy products. A related study is EM 009 321 announced in RIEFEB72. (Author/MK)
Network programming and advertising in the Saturday children's hours : a June and November comparison. A report for Action for Children's Television by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

3 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Weekday, daytime commercial television programming for children by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

3 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Representations of life on children's television : sex roles, minorities, and families by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Television in the afternoon hours : a study of programming and advertising for children on independent stations across the United States by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Description of Children's Television Advertising by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

2 editions published in 1971 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper is a report of two studies which were conducted on children's television. The first, "Saturday Children's Television," is a content analysis of programming and advertising matter on four Boston commercial tv stations. The second, "Romper Room, An Analysis," focuses on that program's commercial practices. The first study involved the video-taping of 18 3/4 hours of programming taken over four Saturdays. The analysis provides: (1) an overall description of program materials; (2) discussion of specific aspects of the programs (violence, laugh tracks, etc.); and (3) a statistical description and discussion of commercial messages. The "Romper Room" study was drawn from tapes of one week's programs, 45 minutes per day. The analysis centered around (1) the amount of program time spent in displaying brand name toys; (2) time devoted to other activities; (3) time devoted to commercial announcements; (4) extent to which hostess gave commercials herself; and (5) extent of advertising of Romper Room-Hasbro toys. This study revealed that 45 percent of the program for the week was devoted to commercial promotion of its own products. (Author/AJ)
Weekend children's television, 1975 by Francis Earle Barcus( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.40 (from 0.33 for Weekend ch ... to 0.80 for Descriptio ...)

Alternative Names
Barcus, F.

Barcus, F. Earle 1927-

Barcus, F. Earle (Francis Earle), 1927-

Barcus, Francis E.

Earle Barcus Francis

Languages
English (88)