WorldCat Identities

McGranahan, Carole

Overview
Works: 15 works in 59 publications in 1 language and 1,591 library holdings
Genres: History  Academic theses 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: DS786, 951.055
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Carole McGranahan
Arrested histories : Tibet, the CIA, and memories of a forgotten war by Carole McGranahan( Book )

17 editions published between 2001 and 2010 in English and held by 524 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the 1950s, thousands of ordinary Tibetans rose up to defend their country and religion against Chinese troops. Their citizen army fought through 1974 with covert support from the Tibetan exile government and the governments of India, Nepal, and the United States. Decades later, the story of this resistance is only beginning to be told and has not yet entered the annals of Tibetan national history. In Arrested Histories, the anthropologist and historian Carole McGranahan shows how and why histories of this resistance army are "arrested" and explains the ensuing repercussions for the Tibetan refugee community.Drawing on rich ethnographic and historical research, McGranahan tells the story of the Tibetan resistance and the social processes through which this history is made and unmade, and lived and forgotten in the present. Fulfillment of veterans' desire for recognition hinges on the Dalai Lama and "historical arrest," a practice in which the telling of certain pasts is suspended until an undetermined time in the future. In this analysis, struggles over history emerge as a profound pain of belonging. Tibetan cultural politics, regional identities, and religious commitments cannot be disentangled from imperial histories, contemporary geopolitics, and romanticized representations of Tibet. Moving deftly from armed struggle to nonviolent hunger strikes, and from diplomatic offices to refugee camps, Arrested Histories provides powerful insights into the stakes of political engagement and the cultural contradictions of everyday life
Imperial formations( Book )

9 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 340 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies. The Ottoman, Russian, Chinese, Spanish, and Japanese empires provide provocative case studies that challenge the temporal and conceptual framework within which colonial studies usually operates. Was the Soviet Union an empire or a nation-state? What of Tibet, only recently colonized but long engaged with several imperial powers? Imperial Formations alters our understanding of past empires the better to understand the way that complex history shapes the politics of the present imperial juncture."--Back cover
Ethnographies of U.S. empire( )

7 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 319 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How do we live in and with empire? The contributors to this book pursue this question by examining empire as an unequally shared present. Here empire stands as an entrenched, if often invisible, part of everyday life central to making and remaking a world in which it is too often presented as an aberration rather than as a structuring condition. This volume presents scholarship from across U.S. imperial formations: settler colonialism, overseas territories, communities impacted by U.S. military action of political intervention, Cold War alliances and fissures, and, most recently, new forms of U.S. empire after 9/11. From the Mohawk Nation, Korea, and the Philippines to Iraq and the hills of New Jersey, the contributors show how a methodological and theoretical commitment to ethnography sharpens all of our understandings of the novel and timeworn ways people live, thrive, and resist in the imperial present
Writing anthropology : essays on craft & commitment( )

11 editions published in 2020 in English and held by 311 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"WRITING ANTHROPOLOGY gathers fifty three essays on writing from leading anthropologists on their approach to writing and its current practice in the field. In the past several decades, as anthropologists have grappled with questions of how to ethically portray their subjects, ethnographic writing styles have also changed from a detached, objective voice to one that is more humanistic and self-reflexive. To explore these changes in writing styles and approaches, Carole McGranahan curated a series for the blog Savage Minds: Notes and Queries in Anthropology on the craft of writing and anthropology. This anthology collects expanded versions of these essays, as well as new additions, and raises wide-ranging questions about what it means to write ethnographically. The book is divided into ten sections: Ruminations, Writing Ideas, Telling Stories, On Responsibility, The Urgency of Now, Writing With, Writing Against, Academic Authors, Ethnographic Genres, Becoming and Belonging, and Writing and Knowing. Essays include Ruth Behar on reading as a writer, Adia Benton on how the passage of time can create fuller ethnographic accounts, and Yarimar Bonilla on the temporality of reading and writing in the digital age. Other contributors include Press authors such as Anand Pandian, Lauren Berlant, Kathleen Stewart, Stuart McLean, and Kristen Ghodsee. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of anthropology and creative writing"--
Developing Tibet? : a survey of international development projects by Ann Armbrecht( Book )

4 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ethnographies of U.S. Empire( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How do we live in and with empire? The contributors to Ethnographies of U.S. Empire pursue this question by examining empire as an unequally shared present. Here empire stands as an entrenched, if often invisible, part of everyday life central to making and remaking a world in which it is too often presented as an aberration rather than as a structuring condition. This volume presents scholarship from across U.S. imperial formations: settler colonialism, overseas territories, communities impacted by U.S. military action or political intervention, Cold War alliances and fissures, and, most recently, new forms of U.S. empire after 9/11. From the Mohawk Nation, Korea, and the Philippines to Iraq and the hills of New Jersey, the contributors show how a methodological and theoretical commitment to ethnography sharpens all of our understandings of the novel and timeworn ways people live, thrive, and resist in the imperial present.Contributors: Kevin K. Birth, Joe Bryan, John F. Collins, Jean Dennison, Erin Fitz-Henry, Adriana María Garriga-López, Olívia Maria Gomes da Cunha, Matthew Gutmann, Ju Hui Judy Han, J. Kēhaulani Kauanui, Eleana Kim, Heonik Kwon, Soo Ah Kwon, Darryl Li, Catherine Lutz, Sunaina Maira, Carole McGranahan, Sean T. Mitchell, Jan M. Padios, Melissa Rosario, Audra Simpson, Ann Laura Stoler, Fa'anofo Lisaclaire Uperesa, David Vine
Narrative dispossession : Tibet and the gendered logics of historical possibility by Carole McGranahan( )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Refusal as political practice : citizenship, sovereignty, and Tibetan refugee status by Carole McGranahan( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Humanism : the Second Annual Debate of Anthropological Keywords by Carole McGranahan( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Truth, fear, and lies : exile politics and arrested histories of the Tibetan resistance by Carole McGranahan( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Stories of darkness: Congolese refugees, humanitarian governance, and a neglected conflict by Marnie Jane Thomson( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

How do refugees fare when the conflict they fled is declared beyond the scope of humanitarian intervention? To answer this question, this ethnography examines the politics of humanitarian solutions--and lack thereof--across national borders through the closure of UN refugee camps in Tanzania and the withdrawal of humanitarian assistance in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). My research is based on more than two years of participant observation and interviews in refugee camps, aid compounds, and government offices across Tanzania, and ethnographic research on war, reconciliation, and everyday life in South Kivu, DRC. I also interviewed UN Refugee Agency representatives in Nairobi, Kenya, and in Geneva, Switzerland, asking both theory and policy oriented questions. This ethnographic focus also reflects my theoretical approach, which views refugees and humanitarians through the same lens; I treat "humanitarian categories" as ethnographic objects rather than reifying the distinctions they impose. This dissertation analyzes the exclusion of refugee narratives of political instability, loss, and the violence of displacement in favor of narratives of ethnic and gendered persecution. Within the humanitarian apparatus, Congo continues to be narrated as the "heart of darkness," an area long characterized by brutal ethnic and sexual violence. I argue that this narrative is reinforced through what I call "narrative resonance," the prolonging, reinforcement, or amplification of parts of a story through a point of reflection or congruence within another accepted story. The distressing irony is that refugees must perpetuate these racist narratives that justify the international humanitarian regime's neglect of Congo in order to receive international protection for themselves and their families
Working for a happy life in Bangalore: Gender, generation, and temporal liminality in India's tech city by Rachel C Fleming( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In Bangalore, women who work in information technology (IT) and other white-collar professions are part of a new generation of middle-class Indian women who expect to work. Beyond previous narratives of work as a "backup" in case a normative married life is not possible, these women now consider work important for their self-confidence and identity. The opportunity to work is also tied to India's economic liberalization and ideas about what constitutes a good life as compared to the past, including a more expansive social life, more varied knowledge about the world, more gender equality at work and home, and a different kind of marriage. However, from the demands of work putting stress on families and relationships to sexism that seems ever more entrenched, the promise of work often becomes disappointment. At work, women feel exploited, yet when they leave or go part time they experience a painful loss of self. This dissertation draws on fieldwork in Bangalore with middle-class women from three generations to examine the effects of new regimes of work on women's lives and senses of identity. As elsewhere, global neoliberal reconfigurations of work in Bangalore are both exploitive and essential in constructing the self. However, using a feminist perspective, this project argues that these pressures map onto existing gendered expectations, so when women in Bangalore attempt to construct a happy life their choices are not be as expansive as they had hoped, while the responsibility for failure falls on their shoulders. Using temporality as a way to frame these anxieties, I find that the multiple identities women inhabit in the course of their daily lives have gendered and temporal constraints, creating a state of vulnerability I term "temporal liminality." These constraints are especially apparent when women combine their kinship identities with those in global capitalist workplaces, in that women must contend with social and personal ideas about the past and future, ideas about life course, and the value and use of their time on a daily basis, questions that bring gendered morality to bear on time itself
Kashmir and Tibet : Comparing Conflicts, States, and Solutions by Carole McGranahan( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Resistance and unity : the chinesese invasion, Markchi Shangri Lhagyal, and a history of Tibet (1949-1959) by Tashi Gelek( Book )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mao in Tibetan disguise : history, ethnography, and excess = Mao en habite tibétains : histoire, ethnographie, et excès by Carole McGranahan( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.47 for Narrative ... to 0.99 for Mao in Tib ...)

Covers
Imperial formations
Alternative Names
Mac Granahan Carole 1969-....

MacGranahan Carole 1969-....

Mc Granahan Carole 1969-....

McGranahan, Carole

Languages
English (59)