WorldCat Identities

Rosekind, Mark R.

Overview
Works: 26 works in 40 publications in 1 language and 1,712 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Mark R Rosekind
Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crew Factors in Flight Operations VII: Psychophysiological Responses to Overnight Cargo Operations( )

2 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To document the psychophysiological effects of flying overnight cargo operations, 41 B-727 crew members (average age 38 yr) were monitored before, during, and after one of two typical 8-day trip patterns. During daytime layovers, the average sleep episode was 3 hr (41%) shorter than nighttime sleeps and was rated as lighter, less restorative, and poorer overall. Sleep was frequently split into several episodes and totaled 1.2 hr less per 24 hr than on pretrip days. Each trip pattern included a night off, which was an effective countermeasure against the accumulating sleep debt. The organization of sleep during daytime layovers reflected the interaction of duty timing with circadian physiology. The circadian temperature rhythm did not adapt completely to the inverted wake-rest schedule on duty days, being delayed by about 3 hr. Highest subjective fatigue and lowest activation occurred around the time of the temperature minimum. On duty days, reports of headaches increased by 400%, of congested nose by 200%, and of burning eyes by 900%. Crew members also reported eating more snacks. Compared with daytime short-haul air-transport operations, the overnight cargo trips included fewer duty and flight hours, and had longer layovers. Overnight cargo crews also averaged 5.4 yr younger than their daytime short-haul counterparts. On trips, both groups lost a comparable amount of sleep per 24 hi, but the overnight cargo crews had shorter individual sleep episodes and more broken sleep. These data clearly demonstrate that overnight cargo operations, like other night work, involve physiological disruption not found in comparable daytime operations
From laboratory to flightdeck : promoting operational alertness by Mark R Rosekind( )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sleep management manual by Tamsin Lisa Kelly( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sleep is an essential physical need, like food, air, and water. You can skimp on it only to a point and still function. You will only perform and feel your best if you get an optimum amount of sleep. When operational requirements make this impossible, it is critical that you obtain the maximum amount of sleep possible within operational limitations. Also, it important that you know the effects of sleep deprivation so that countermeasures can be used to compensate. The purpose of this manual is to provide naval personnel with the basic facts about sleep and to teach them specific sleep management techniques
Crew factors in flight operations : the initial NASA-Ames Field Studies on Fatigue( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crew fatigue research focusing on development and use of effective countermeasures( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Principles and guidelines for duty and rest scheduling in commercial aviation by David F Dinges( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Regional operations encompass a broad range of pilots and equipment. This module is intended to help all those involved in regional aviation, including pilots, schedulers, dispatchers, maintenance technicians, policy makers, and others, to understand the physiological factors underlying fatigue, how flight operations affect fatigue, and what can be done to counteract fatigue and maximize alertness and performance in their operations. The overall purpose of this module is to promote aviation safety, performance, and productivity. It is intended to meet three specific objectives (1) to explain the current state of knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying fatigue (2) to demonstrate how this knowledge can be applied to improving flight crew sleep, performance, and alertness and (3) to offer strategies for alertness management. Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) and National Transportation Safety Board (NISH) reports are used throughout this module to demonstrate that fatigue is a safety issue in the regional operations community. The appendices at the end of this module include the ASRS reports used for the examples contained in this publication, brief introductions to sleep disorders and relaxation techniques, summaries of relevant NASA publications, and a list of general readings on sleep, sleep disorders, and circadian rhythms
Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Regional operations encompass a broad range of pilots and equipment. This module is intended to help all those involved in regional aviation, including pilots, schedulers, dispatchers, maintenance technicians, policy makers, and others, to understand the physiological factors underlying fatigue, how flight operations affect fatigue, and what can be done to counteract fatigue and maximize alertness and performance in their operations. The overall purpose of this module is to promote aviation safety, performance, and productivity. It is intended to meet three specific objectives (1) to explain the current state of knowledge about the physiological mechanisms underlying fatigue (2) to demonstrate how this knowledge can be applied to improving flight crew sleep, performance, and alertness and (3) to offer strategies for alertness management. Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) and National Transportation Safety Board (NISH) reports are used throughout this module to demonstrate that fatigue is a safety issue in the regional operations community. The appendices at the end of this module include the ASRS reports used for the examples contained in this publication, brief introductions to sleep disorders and relaxation techniques, summaries of relevant NASA publications, and a list of general readings on sleep, sleep disorders, and circadian rhythms
Fatigue in operational settings : examples from the aviation environment( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Alertness in flight operations : strategic napping by Mark R Rosekind( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Pilot fatigue survey : exploring fatigue factors in air medical operations by Kevin B Gregory( )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In response to a 1980 congressional request, NASA Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue Jet Lag Program to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in aviation. Research has examined fatigue in a variety of flight environments using a range of measures (from self-report to performance to physiological). In 1991, the program evolved into the Fatigue Countermeasures Program, emphasizing the development and evaluation of strategies to maintain alertness and performance in operational settings. Over the years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has become a collaborative partner in support of fatigue research and other Program activities. From the inception of the Program, a principal goal was to return the information learned from research and other Program activities to the operational community. The objectives of this Education and Training Module are to explain what has been learned about the physiological mechanisms that underlie fatigue, demonstrate the application of this information in flight operations, and offer some specific fatigue counter-measure recommendations. It is intended for all segments of the aeronautics industry, including pilots, flight attendants, managers, schedulers, safety and policy personnel, maintenance crews, and others involved in an operational environment that challenges human physiological capabilities because of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption
Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

2 editions published between 1994 and 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sleep and fatigue( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crew factors in flight operations( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In response to a 1980 congressional request, NASA Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue Jet Lag Program to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in aviation. Research has examined fatigue in a variety of flight environments using a range of measures (from self-report to performance to physiological). In 1991, the program evolved into the Fatigue Countermeasures Program, emphasizing the development and evaluation of strategies to maintain alertness and performance in operational settings. Over the years, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has become a collaborative partner in support of fatigue research and other Program activities. From the inception of the Program, a principal goal was to return the information learned from research and other Program activities to the operational community. The objectives of this Education and Training Module are to explain what has been learned about the physiological mechanisms that underlie fatigue, demonstrate the application of this information in flight operations, and offer some specific fatigue counter-measure recommendations. It is intended for all segments of the aeronautics industry, including pilots, flight attendants, managers, schedulers, safety and policy personnel, maintenance crews, and others involved in an operational environment that challenges human physiological capabilities because of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption
 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
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  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.49 (from 0.39 for Alertness ... to 1.00 for Crew facto ...)

Languages
English (40)